Winnipeg Humane Society's Latest Articles Winnipeg Humane Society's Latest Articles Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:00:55 -0500 Zend_Feed_Writer 1.11.12 (http://framework.zend.com) http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/ The Black Dog Club meets this Saturday Posted in: News, Event

The Black Dog Club meets once a month at one of Winnipeg's dog parks. The next Black Dog Club walk will be:

When: Saturday, July 26, 11:00 a.m.

Where: Charleswood Parkway Dog Park

 

Check out our Black Dog Club video here!

Check out photos from our official club events here!

Read a heartfelt story, The Black Dog From Whitedog.

 

It’s actually not a problem with black dogs but with the people who discriminate against them. Black dogs are usually the last to get adopted and it’s not for fair reasons.

Old superstitions play a part. Some believe black dogs are more aggressive. Some say dimly lit shelters are to blame.

Whatever the reason, when you adopt one of our black dogs, you will automatically become a member of The WHS Black Dog Club! When you show your membership card, you will receive 10% off everything* in The WHS Gift Shop, with no expiry.

Go and pick out something bright for your new black dog!

After all, black goes with everything!

 *With the exception of food, litter, and sales items.

Any Black dogs with a 75% or mostly black coat can be a member of The WHS Black Dog Club! If you feel that you have a black dog who deserves to be a member of The WHS Black Dog Club, you are more than welcome to join!


If you already have a black dog, don't panic! Attend one of our Black Dog Club Meet and Greets with your black dog or stop by The WHS with your dog (or with a photo of you with your dog), sign up and you will receive a membership card and a member number. You will receive 10% off* at The WHS gift shop when you show your Black Dog Club membership card!

*With the exception of food, litter and sale items.

Send us a picture of YOUR black dog! We will stamp it with The WHS Black Dog Club logo and post it on our website for all to enjoy. Please don't forget to tell us your dog's name so that we can include it with your picture!

 


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Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:00:00 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,344;The-Black-Dog-Club-meets-this-Saturday http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,344;The-Black-Dog-Club-meets-this-Saturday Posted in: News, Event

The Black Dog Club meets once a month at one of Winnipeg's dog parks. The next Black Dog Club walk will be:

When: Saturday, July 26, 11:00 a.m.

Where: Charleswood Parkway Dog Park

 

Check out our Black Dog Club video here!

Check out photos from our official club events here!

Read a heartfelt story, The Black Dog From Whitedog.

 

It’s actually not a problem with black dogs but with the people who discriminate against them. Black dogs are usually the last to get adopted and it’s not for fair reasons.

Old superstitions play a part. Some believe black dogs are more aggressive. Some say dimly lit shelters are to blame.

Whatever the reason, when you adopt one of our black dogs, you will automatically become a member of The WHS Black Dog Club! When you show your membership card, you will receive 10% off everything* in The WHS Gift Shop, with no expiry.

Go and pick out something bright for your new black dog!

After all, black goes with everything!

 *With the exception of food, litter, and sales items.

Any Black dogs with a 75% or mostly black coat can be a member of The WHS Black Dog Club! If you feel that you have a black dog who deserves to be a member of The WHS Black Dog Club, you are more than welcome to join!


If you already have a black dog, don't panic! Attend one of our Black Dog Club Meet and Greets with your black dog or stop by The WHS with your dog (or with a photo of you with your dog), sign up and you will receive a membership card and a member number. You will receive 10% off* at The WHS gift shop when you show your Black Dog Club membership card!

*With the exception of food, litter and sale items.

Send us a picture of YOUR black dog! We will stamp it with The WHS Black Dog Club logo and post it on our website for all to enjoy. Please don't forget to tell us your dog's name so that we can include it with your picture!

 


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Winnipeg Humane Society promotes puppies and dogs for reduced prices Posted in: News, Press-Release, Event

The dog days of summer have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society. As of July 15, The WHS has 63 dogs and 24 puppies in its care, with 32 dogs coming in last week alone. About half of these dogs are available for adoption, while others are in foster care. The WHS is having a promotion on Friday, July 25 to help dogs and puppies find homes: all adult dogs (six months and older) will be $50 to adopt. Puppies under six months will be $150.

“We’re reaching a peak where there are more dogs coming in than there are being adopted out,” said Judy Dean, WHS Adoptions Manager. “Many dogs have been waiting for months for their forever homes, so we’re happy to encourage more adopters to come in by offering reduced adoption fees.”

In 2013, The WHS took in 1,589 dogs, 540 of which were strays. So far in 2014, 924 dogs and puppies have arrived at The WHS. Once an animal reaches The WHS’s adoptions area, they stay there until they are adopted. Long-term animals often get a reprieve from the shelter by spending time in a foster home.

“Some of these dogs have spent their whole lives in the shelter,” said Dean. “They receive constant attention and love from our staff and volunteers, but it’s time for them to find stability in a home environment.”

While adoption fees will be reduced, the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All family members, including resident dogs, should be present during the adoption process. There will be no holds allowed the day before or the day of the promotion.

All dogs and puppies adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, City of Winnipeg Dog License, 30 day Petplan health insurance, and a two-week health check.

 ###

 The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. The WHS is more than just pet adoption – the shelter offers education programs for children and adults to encourage responsible pet ownership, and a fully-functional veterinary clinic that performs subsidized spay and neuter surgeries for Winnipeggers on fixed or low-income. For more information, visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


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Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:49:30 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,367;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-promotes-puppies-and-dogs-for-reduced-prices http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,367;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-promotes-puppies-and-dogs-for-reduced-prices Posted in: News, Press-Release, Event

The dog days of summer have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society. As of July 15, The WHS has 63 dogs and 24 puppies in its care, with 32 dogs coming in last week alone. About half of these dogs are available for adoption, while others are in foster care. The WHS is having a promotion on Friday, July 25 to help dogs and puppies find homes: all adult dogs (six months and older) will be $50 to adopt. Puppies under six months will be $150.

“We’re reaching a peak where there are more dogs coming in than there are being adopted out,” said Judy Dean, WHS Adoptions Manager. “Many dogs have been waiting for months for their forever homes, so we’re happy to encourage more adopters to come in by offering reduced adoption fees.”

In 2013, The WHS took in 1,589 dogs, 540 of which were strays. So far in 2014, 924 dogs and puppies have arrived at The WHS. Once an animal reaches The WHS’s adoptions area, they stay there until they are adopted. Long-term animals often get a reprieve from the shelter by spending time in a foster home.

“Some of these dogs have spent their whole lives in the shelter,” said Dean. “They receive constant attention and love from our staff and volunteers, but it’s time for them to find stability in a home environment.”

While adoption fees will be reduced, the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All family members, including resident dogs, should be present during the adoption process. There will be no holds allowed the day before or the day of the promotion.

All dogs and puppies adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, City of Winnipeg Dog License, 30 day Petplan health insurance, and a two-week health check.

 ###

 The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. The WHS is more than just pet adoption – the shelter offers education programs for children and adults to encourage responsible pet ownership, and a fully-functional veterinary clinic that performs subsidized spay and neuter surgeries for Winnipeggers on fixed or low-income. For more information, visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


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Help us win the Shelter Challenge! Posted in: News, Take-Action

The Animal Rescue Site is once again issuing the Shelter ChallengeThe Summer Fun Shelter Challenge began on July 14. Visit shelterchallenge.com, search for The Winnipeg Humane Society, and vote! Please support The WHS - you can vote everyday!

The Winnipeg Humane Society relies on donor support to function. This prize could make a big difference for our animals. Here's a breakdown of where donations to The WHS will go:

 

spay or neuter one cat

$35

 

spay or neuter one dog

$75

 

dental cleaning OR two x-rays

$100

 

care for an animal for an entire week

$200

 

Total: 

$410

 

 

Vote today, vote tomorrow, and vote often! Please spread the word among your family and friends.

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity dedicated to protecting animals from suffering and to promoting their welfare and dignity.

 

The WHS is a non-profit, volunteer-based organization funded primarily by donations and special events.

 

The premiere shelter and advocacy organization in Manitoba, Canada, The Winnipeg Humane Society has been a leader in the animal welfare arena since 1894. Our animal shelter takes in more than 8,000 animals a year and no animal is turned away because of health or temperament. In addition to many educational programs and community outreach initiatives, The WHS is also very involved in farm animal welfare issues.


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Fri, 18 Jul 2014 00:00:00 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,337;Help-us-win-the-Shelter-Challenge http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,337;Help-us-win-the-Shelter-Challenge Posted in: News, Take-Action

The Animal Rescue Site is once again issuing the Shelter ChallengeThe Summer Fun Shelter Challenge began on July 14. Visit shelterchallenge.com, search for The Winnipeg Humane Society, and vote! Please support The WHS - you can vote everyday!

The Winnipeg Humane Society relies on donor support to function. This prize could make a big difference for our animals. Here's a breakdown of where donations to The WHS will go:

 

spay or neuter one cat

$35

 

spay or neuter one dog

$75

 

dental cleaning OR two x-rays

$100

 

care for an animal for an entire week

$200

 

Total: 

$410

 

 

Vote today, vote tomorrow, and vote often! Please spread the word among your family and friends.

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity dedicated to protecting animals from suffering and to promoting their welfare and dignity.

 

The WHS is a non-profit, volunteer-based organization funded primarily by donations and special events.

 

The premiere shelter and advocacy organization in Manitoba, Canada, The Winnipeg Humane Society has been a leader in the animal welfare arena since 1894. Our animal shelter takes in more than 8,000 animals a year and no animal is turned away because of health or temperament. In addition to many educational programs and community outreach initiatives, The WHS is also very involved in farm animal welfare issues.


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Adopt a critter for half price until July 27! Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Event

From now until July 27 at The Winnipeg Humane Society - you can adopt a critter for half off the adoption fee! Come meet the rabbit, rat, or guinea pig of your dreams this week at The WHS.

Check out our adoption fees here or call 204-982-2035 for more info!

July 18th - 27th at The WHS - 45 Hurst Way!

 


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Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:22:06 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,366;Adopt-a-critter-for-half-price-until-July-27 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,366;Adopt-a-critter-for-half-price-until-July-27 Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Event

From now until July 27 at The Winnipeg Humane Society - you can adopt a critter for half off the adoption fee! Come meet the rabbit, rat, or guinea pig of your dreams this week at The WHS.

Check out our adoption fees here or call 204-982-2035 for more info!

July 18th - 27th at The WHS - 45 Hurst Way!

 


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Lily is a sweet dog who came to us in terrible condition Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

This is Lily. She came to The WHS May as a stray, this May, in extremely poor condition. Her coat was matted with dirt and her head was completely covered in filth. Lily has demodex, a skin disease caused by mites.

Before

Before

Despite all she's been through, Lily is incredibly sweet and friendly. She's gotten lots of love and care at our clinic, where staff gave her baths and treatment daily to help alleviate her pain.

Lily is now recovering in a loving foster home before she's ready to go up for adoption.  Please help Lily and other animals like her, who come to The Winnipeg Humane Society in extremely poor condition and need extra rehabilitation before they get their second chance at a forever home.


After

 

You can help Lily - and thousands of other animals per year. Click here to donate to the Lily Fund!


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Fri, 11 Jul 2014 08:45:35 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,365;Lily-is-a-sweet-dog-who-came-to-us-in-terrible-condition http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,365;Lily-is-a-sweet-dog-who-came-to-us-in-terrible-condition Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

This is Lily. She came to The WHS May as a stray, this May, in extremely poor condition. Her coat was matted with dirt and her head was completely covered in filth. Lily has demodex, a skin disease caused by mites.

Before

Before

Despite all she's been through, Lily is incredibly sweet and friendly. She's gotten lots of love and care at our clinic, where staff gave her baths and treatment daily to help alleviate her pain.

Lily is now recovering in a loving foster home before she's ready to go up for adoption.  Please help Lily and other animals like her, who come to The Winnipeg Humane Society in extremely poor condition and need extra rehabilitation before they get their second chance at a forever home.


After

 

You can help Lily - and thousands of other animals per year. Click here to donate to the Lily Fund!


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Sign up for Pet First Aid Posted in: News, Event

Pet First Aid Course

The Winnipeg Humane Society offers a Pet First Aid Course on Thursday, June 26 from 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.

This "paws-on" course is designed to give pet lovers the necessary information that will help you respond to a life-threatening emergency involving your dog or cat.  Every pet lover should learn these important skills:

  • how to approach a sick or injured dog or cat
  • safe restraint and transport
  • recognition and assessment of an emergency involving your pet
  • to give lifesaving rescue breathing and CPR to cats and dogs with practice on a mannequin used by veterinary schools
  • choking, shock and severe bleeding
  • how to handle common emergencies
  • making a pet first aid kit and preparing for emergencies
  • local contacts for pet welfare and emergencies

The cost of this course is $65 per person. This fee includes a pet first aid textbook. Pet First Aid Kits can be purchased for $34.95. Space is limited, so pre-registration and payment in advance is required. To register, please call 204-982-3555.

Pet First Aid Kit

A St. John Ambulance pet first aid kit is available for purchase at our WHS Gift Shop, even if you don't register for the course.  The cost of the kit is $34.95 and includes the following:

  • Dressing
  • Sterile Gauze Pads
  • Cotton Tip Applicators
  • TriangularBand
  • Universal Scissors
  • Tongue Depressors
  • Splinter Forceps
  • Sting Stop Prop Pads
  • Mayday Water Pouches
  • Splint Metal/Aluminum
  • Adhesive Tape
  • Anticeptic Wipes
  • Tensor
  • Splinter Out
  • Rectal Thermometer
  • Wound Seal Topical Powder
  • Conforming Gauze
  • Syringe
  • Lubricating Jelly
  • Pet Manual (St. John Ambulance)
  • Gloves


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Thu, 19 Jun 2014 00:00:00 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,311;Sign-up-for-Pet-First-Aid http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,311;Sign-up-for-Pet-First-Aid Posted in: News, Event

Pet First Aid Course

The Winnipeg Humane Society offers a Pet First Aid Course on Thursday, June 26 from 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.

This "paws-on" course is designed to give pet lovers the necessary information that will help you respond to a life-threatening emergency involving your dog or cat.  Every pet lover should learn these important skills:

  • how to approach a sick or injured dog or cat
  • safe restraint and transport
  • recognition and assessment of an emergency involving your pet
  • to give lifesaving rescue breathing and CPR to cats and dogs with practice on a mannequin used by veterinary schools
  • choking, shock and severe bleeding
  • how to handle common emergencies
  • making a pet first aid kit and preparing for emergencies
  • local contacts for pet welfare and emergencies

The cost of this course is $65 per person. This fee includes a pet first aid textbook. Pet First Aid Kits can be purchased for $34.95. Space is limited, so pre-registration and payment in advance is required. To register, please call 204-982-3555.

Pet First Aid Kit

A St. John Ambulance pet first aid kit is available for purchase at our WHS Gift Shop, even if you don't register for the course.  The cost of the kit is $34.95 and includes the following:

  • Dressing
  • Sterile Gauze Pads
  • Cotton Tip Applicators
  • TriangularBand
  • Universal Scissors
  • Tongue Depressors
  • Splinter Forceps
  • Sting Stop Prop Pads
  • Mayday Water Pouches
  • Splint Metal/Aluminum
  • Adhesive Tape
  • Anticeptic Wipes
  • Tensor
  • Splinter Out
  • Rectal Thermometer
  • Wound Seal Topical Powder
  • Conforming Gauze
  • Syringe
  • Lubricating Jelly
  • Pet Manual (St. John Ambulance)
  • Gloves


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Be your pet’s Super Hero at The Fairmont Winnipeg Paws in Motion Not enough spay and neuter surgeries booked Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action

Not enough spay and neuter surgeries booked: The Winnipeg Humane Society

WINNIPEG - The Winnipeg Humane Society clinic is at an unseasonal low for its subsidized spay and neuter program, SNAP. Winnipeggers on fixed or low income can apply for SNAP to fix their cat for around $30. Ideally, the WHS clinic performs 10 or more SNAP surgeries per day, but very few slots have been booked up for June and July.

“It is concerning – we know there are unfixed cats out there making kittens and we can help,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health. “We held the very successful Beat the Heat program earlier this year, where we performed 500 spay surgeries in one month before cats entered their first heat. We want people to know they can fix their cat with us year-round.”

Spay and neuter surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range between $125 and $225. Spaying and neutering is crucial as many shelters are overcrowded and too many cats remain homeless. SNAP usually has long wait times so The WHS is encouraging those interested to book now before the rush picks up.

“The best way to keep unwanted litters off the streets is prevention,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “We need to start doing more spay and neuters. Spaying or neutering your pets will help end Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis.”

Subsidized spay and neuter surgeries are also available for dogs and rabbits, and for pets living outside of Winnipeg.  Participants in this program may qualify according to their household income. Call 204-888-SNAP (7627) for more information or to book an appointment.

 ###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in over 8,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Thu, 05 Jun 2014 09:08:29 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,363;Not-enough-spay-and-neuter-surgeries-booked http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,363;Not-enough-spay-and-neuter-surgeries-booked Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action

Not enough spay and neuter surgeries booked: The Winnipeg Humane Society

WINNIPEG - The Winnipeg Humane Society clinic is at an unseasonal low for its subsidized spay and neuter program, SNAP. Winnipeggers on fixed or low income can apply for SNAP to fix their cat for around $30. Ideally, the WHS clinic performs 10 or more SNAP surgeries per day, but very few slots have been booked up for June and July.

“It is concerning – we know there are unfixed cats out there making kittens and we can help,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health. “We held the very successful Beat the Heat program earlier this year, where we performed 500 spay surgeries in one month before cats entered their first heat. We want people to know they can fix their cat with us year-round.”

Spay and neuter surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range between $125 and $225. Spaying and neutering is crucial as many shelters are overcrowded and too many cats remain homeless. SNAP usually has long wait times so The WHS is encouraging those interested to book now before the rush picks up.

“The best way to keep unwanted litters off the streets is prevention,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “We need to start doing more spay and neuters. Spaying or neutering your pets will help end Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis.”

Subsidized spay and neuter surgeries are also available for dogs and rabbits, and for pets living outside of Winnipeg.  Participants in this program may qualify according to their household income. Call 204-888-SNAP (7627) for more information or to book an appointment.

 ###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in over 8,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Be a Humane Host! Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event


Be a Humane Host!

This summer, when guests ask what should I bring?


You'll have the perfect answer!


Become a Humane Host and turn any summer get-together into a fundraiser to help animals in need!

When extending an invitation to your party , occasion or gathering- you almost always get the question...."What should I bring?"

The best answer possible is... "please bring nothing, however I will be accepting donations to support The Winnipeg Humane Society"

Call us today at 204-982-2041 to pick up your Humane Host kit - to become the host with the most...heart!
                                                                                                                       


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Fri, 30 May 2014 16:23:49 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,362;Be-a-Humane-Host http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,362;Be-a-Humane-Host Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event


Be a Humane Host!

This summer, when guests ask what should I bring?


You'll have the perfect answer!


Become a Humane Host and turn any summer get-together into a fundraiser to help animals in need!

When extending an invitation to your party , occasion or gathering- you almost always get the question...."What should I bring?"

The best answer possible is... "please bring nothing, however I will be accepting donations to support The Winnipeg Humane Society"

Call us today at 204-982-2041 to pick up your Humane Host kit - to become the host with the most...heart!
                                                                                                                       


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The Price is Purrfect for a subsidized spay or neuter at The WHS! Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Price is Purrfect for a Subsidized Spay or Neuter: Winnipeg Humane Society

The business of Internet cat videos is a competitive, high stakes game. The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is set to reveal two new fabulous feline celebrities who can rival Colonel Meow, Lil Bub or Grumpy Cat any day. Mr. Bojangles and Fluffy are the cool cat stars of a new video called “The Price is Purrfect,” produced by cinematographer and rising star herself, Samara Funk. The video is a nod to the classic game show “The Price is Right” and its former host, spay and neuter advocate Bob Barker.

“Creating this video was a ton of fun! It was great to combine my love for animals and my passion for filming to help promote the spay and neuter initiative at The WHS,” said Funk, a recent graduate of the Creative Communications program at Red River College. “Not to mention, the cats were amazing actresses – they really had to stretch their acting skills by pretending they were male contestants.”

Funk is confident her clip will take its place among cat video royalty, while also raising awareness for The WHS’s subsidized spay and neuter program, SNAP. Through SNAP, Winnipeggers on fixed or low income can get their cats spayed or neutered for around $30. The surgery typically costs between $125 and $225 at Winnipeg veterinary clinics.

For more information on SNAP or to book a subsidized spay or neuter surgery, please call 204-888-SNAP (7627).

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. The WHS is more than just pet adoption – the shelter offers education programs for children and adults to encourage responsible pet ownership, and a fully-functional veterinary clinic that performs subsidized spay and neuter surgeries for Winnipeggers on fixed or low-income. For more information, visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


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Thu, 29 May 2014 00:00:00 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,361;The-Price-is-Purrfect-for-a-subsidized-spay-or-neuter-at-The-WHS http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,361;The-Price-is-Purrfect-for-a-subsidized-spay-or-neuter-at-The-WHS Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Price is Purrfect for a Subsidized Spay or Neuter: Winnipeg Humane Society

The business of Internet cat videos is a competitive, high stakes game. The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is set to reveal two new fabulous feline celebrities who can rival Colonel Meow, Lil Bub or Grumpy Cat any day. Mr. Bojangles and Fluffy are the cool cat stars of a new video called “The Price is Purrfect,” produced by cinematographer and rising star herself, Samara Funk. The video is a nod to the classic game show “The Price is Right” and its former host, spay and neuter advocate Bob Barker.

“Creating this video was a ton of fun! It was great to combine my love for animals and my passion for filming to help promote the spay and neuter initiative at The WHS,” said Funk, a recent graduate of the Creative Communications program at Red River College. “Not to mention, the cats were amazing actresses – they really had to stretch their acting skills by pretending they were male contestants.”

Funk is confident her clip will take its place among cat video royalty, while also raising awareness for The WHS’s subsidized spay and neuter program, SNAP. Through SNAP, Winnipeggers on fixed or low income can get their cats spayed or neutered for around $30. The surgery typically costs between $125 and $225 at Winnipeg veterinary clinics.

For more information on SNAP or to book a subsidized spay or neuter surgery, please call 204-888-SNAP (7627).

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. The WHS is more than just pet adoption – the shelter offers education programs for children and adults to encourage responsible pet ownership, and a fully-functional veterinary clinic that performs subsidized spay and neuter surgeries for Winnipeggers on fixed or low-income. For more information, visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


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Winnipeg Humane Society Honours Outstanding Sponsors and Volunteers AT AGM Posted in: News, Press-Release

WINNIPEG, MAY 8 – The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) recognised the exceptional work of volunteers, sponsors and partners at its Annual General Meeting on Wednesday, May 7. Red River Co-op, the Winnipeg Public Library, Ace Burpee, and volunteers Margaret Krupa and Josée Belanger-Galay were acknowledged for their outstanding contributions.

“The Winnipeg Humane Society receives thousands of animals per year, and caring for them is no small feat,” said Bill McDonald, WHS CEO. “We rely on the generous support of volunteers and sponsors to help us do the work we do. We wouldn’t be able to do it without them.”

Red River Co-op received the Corporate Supporter Award for their contributions to major fundraising events. Red River Co-op has supported the shelter for the past six years through their corporate social responsibility program.

The Winnipeg Public Library (WPL) was awarded the WHS Partnership Award for their work with the See Spot Read program, which is now in its sixth year at the WHS. This program is vital not only in helping children learn to read, but also in teaching the values of responsible pet ownership.

Margaret Krupa was awarded Outstanding Volunteer Support for her six years of volunteer work, wherein she donated 1,500 hours of volunteer service in 30 different assignments. On top of her regular two shifts a week doing cat assessments and being a dog kennel buddy, Krupa regularly picks up extra shifts walking dogs or taking dogs to weekend adoption events at satellite locations.

The Outstanding Foster award went to Josée Belanger-Galay. Since 2000, Belanger-Galay has helped over 330 animals prepare for their forever homes by providing them a safe place to recover from surgery or get a much-needed break from the shelter.

Ace Burpee won the Outstanding Media Support Award for his outstanding efforts as a WHS advocate, both on-air for Virgin Radio, and in his well-established online presence. Burpee has also served as emcee at the Bow Wow Ball, The WHS’s fundraising gala, as well as volunteering as a pet foster parent.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS has pets for adoption to the public. All pets available for adoption have been spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and have received a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about cats or dogs for sale or The WHS please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


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Thu, 08 May 2014 10:49:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,359;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-Honours-Outstanding-Sponsors-and-Volunteers-AT-AGM http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,359;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-Honours-Outstanding-Sponsors-and-Volunteers-AT-AGM Posted in: News, Press-Release

WINNIPEG, MAY 8 – The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) recognised the exceptional work of volunteers, sponsors and partners at its Annual General Meeting on Wednesday, May 7. Red River Co-op, the Winnipeg Public Library, Ace Burpee, and volunteers Margaret Krupa and Josée Belanger-Galay were acknowledged for their outstanding contributions.

“The Winnipeg Humane Society receives thousands of animals per year, and caring for them is no small feat,” said Bill McDonald, WHS CEO. “We rely on the generous support of volunteers and sponsors to help us do the work we do. We wouldn’t be able to do it without them.”

Red River Co-op received the Corporate Supporter Award for their contributions to major fundraising events. Red River Co-op has supported the shelter for the past six years through their corporate social responsibility program.

The Winnipeg Public Library (WPL) was awarded the WHS Partnership Award for their work with the See Spot Read program, which is now in its sixth year at the WHS. This program is vital not only in helping children learn to read, but also in teaching the values of responsible pet ownership.

Margaret Krupa was awarded Outstanding Volunteer Support for her six years of volunteer work, wherein she donated 1,500 hours of volunteer service in 30 different assignments. On top of her regular two shifts a week doing cat assessments and being a dog kennel buddy, Krupa regularly picks up extra shifts walking dogs or taking dogs to weekend adoption events at satellite locations.

The Outstanding Foster award went to Josée Belanger-Galay. Since 2000, Belanger-Galay has helped over 330 animals prepare for their forever homes by providing them a safe place to recover from surgery or get a much-needed break from the shelter.

Ace Burpee won the Outstanding Media Support Award for his outstanding efforts as a WHS advocate, both on-air for Virgin Radio, and in his well-established online presence. Burpee has also served as emcee at the Bow Wow Ball, The WHS’s fundraising gala, as well as volunteering as a pet foster parent.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS has pets for adoption to the public. All pets available for adoption have been spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and have received a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about cats or dogs for sale or The WHS please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


]]>
Winnipeg Humane Society offers new class for dog owners with toddlers Posted in: News, Press-Release

Family dogs are used to being the centre of attention, though the situation changes once babies arrive and start to move around the home. Some dogs do well when a child is an infant being carried, but can get stressed once a crawling baby or a toddler gets more playful and grabby.

The Winnipeg Humane Society is now offering Dogs and Toddlers, the follow-up program to the popular Dogs and Storks class. Dogs and Toddlers is designed for parents of infants starting to crawl and grab at the dog, up to pre-school age children. The program addresses a dog’s reaction to a child’s transition to being able to speed around the house.

“Dogs and Toddlers answers questions all new parents have about their pets,” said Dr. Renee Will, certified professional dog trainer and instructor of both Dogs & Storks and Dogs & Toddlers. “The class offers advice about common trouble spots between toddlers and dogs in a home, as well as teaching parents to recognise their dog’s body language to keep their children safe.”

Some of the topics covered are:

  • Answers to questions about toddlers and safety
  • Must-know information for parents who have toddler-age children and dogs
  • Advice about common trouble spots between toddlers and dogs in a home
  • Practical solutions, from do-it-yourself techniques to hands-on help

The first class is on Thursday, May 15 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 per person and pre-registration is required. Call 204-982-3555 to register.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. Along with pet adoption and a subsidized spay and neuter program, The WHS offers education programs and classes that empower children and adults to become responsible pet owners. Classes include Dogs & Storks, What Is My Dog Saying? and dog obedience and puppy socialization classes. Visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca for more information.


]]>
Fri, 02 May 2014 08:34:22 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,358;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-offers-new-class-for-dog-owners-with-toddlers http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,358;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-offers-new-class-for-dog-owners-with-toddlers Posted in: News, Press-Release

Family dogs are used to being the centre of attention, though the situation changes once babies arrive and start to move around the home. Some dogs do well when a child is an infant being carried, but can get stressed once a crawling baby or a toddler gets more playful and grabby.

The Winnipeg Humane Society is now offering Dogs and Toddlers, the follow-up program to the popular Dogs and Storks class. Dogs and Toddlers is designed for parents of infants starting to crawl and grab at the dog, up to pre-school age children. The program addresses a dog’s reaction to a child’s transition to being able to speed around the house.

“Dogs and Toddlers answers questions all new parents have about their pets,” said Dr. Renee Will, certified professional dog trainer and instructor of both Dogs & Storks and Dogs & Toddlers. “The class offers advice about common trouble spots between toddlers and dogs in a home, as well as teaching parents to recognise their dog’s body language to keep their children safe.”

Some of the topics covered are:

  • Answers to questions about toddlers and safety
  • Must-know information for parents who have toddler-age children and dogs
  • Advice about common trouble spots between toddlers and dogs in a home
  • Practical solutions, from do-it-yourself techniques to hands-on help

The first class is on Thursday, May 15 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 per person and pre-registration is required. Call 204-982-3555 to register.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is Manitoba’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency. Along with pet adoption and a subsidized spay and neuter program, The WHS offers education programs and classes that empower children and adults to become responsible pet owners. Classes include Dogs & Storks, What Is My Dog Saying? and dog obedience and puppy socialization classes. Visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca for more information.


]]>
Sign up for the Super Hero Run Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

By running for the animals, you become a hero.


So why not dress like one too?

***Dress up as your favourite hero, or invent a brand new one! Prizes awarded for best costumes.***

Get ready for the Super Hero Run - an all-new run to benefit The Winnipeg Humane Society where runners are encouraged to dress up like their favourite heroes, and hit the road to support Manitoba's animals in need!



Registration is NOW OPEN for the
2014
Super Hero Run!


Register today!

Choose from three options:

     


Want to take it
down a notch?

Register to walk in Paws in Motion!

    

10k Run
(humans only)

5k Run
(humans only)
5k Run with
your dog

 

 

Why Register for The WHS Super Hero Run?
Each year, The Winnipeg Humane Society takes in over 8,000 animals. They desperately need our help to escape the neglect, starvation, or abuse they face on the streets. By registering and raising funds for us, you're helping to provide food, shelter, and critical medical attention to these wonderful and deserving creatures. Can you think of a better way to spend a Sunday?

 

Click here to register!


]]>
Fri, 28 Mar 2014 09:15:08 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,354;Sign-up-for-the-Super-Hero-Run http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,354;Sign-up-for-the-Super-Hero-Run Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

By running for the animals, you become a hero.


So why not dress like one too?

***Dress up as your favourite hero, or invent a brand new one! Prizes awarded for best costumes.***

Get ready for the Super Hero Run - an all-new run to benefit The Winnipeg Humane Society where runners are encouraged to dress up like their favourite heroes, and hit the road to support Manitoba's animals in need!



Registration is NOW OPEN for the
2014
Super Hero Run!


Register today!

Choose from three options:

     


Want to take it
down a notch?

Register to walk in Paws in Motion!

    

10k Run
(humans only)

5k Run
(humans only)
5k Run with
your dog

 

 

Why Register for The WHS Super Hero Run?
Each year, The Winnipeg Humane Society takes in over 8,000 animals. They desperately need our help to escape the neglect, starvation, or abuse they face on the streets. By registering and raising funds for us, you're helping to provide food, shelter, and critical medical attention to these wonderful and deserving creatures. Can you think of a better way to spend a Sunday?

 

Click here to register!


]]>
WHS License Plates Posted in: News, Take-Action

Winnipeg Humane Society License Plates

Show your love of animals – adopt a brand new Winnipeg Humane Society specialty license plate!

 

Where can I get the plates?

Animal lovers can visit any Autopac agent to purchase their plates.

****NEWS ALERT****

 In only 2 days we have sold out the first batch and have over 350 back ordered.  Please don't wait to place your order or you may miss out on having the most lovable plate out there!

The plates are now on sale. Please visit your local Autopac or MPI location to place your order.  Customers can place an order and the plates will be sent to the broker or MPI location for customer pick up once the order has been processed. This process should only take a couple of days.

What vehicles qualify

All passenger vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, motorcycles, mopeds and farm trucks qualify for Winnipeg Humane Society licence plates. Commercial trucks and all other non-passenger vehicles do not qualify.

I already own a different specialty license plate. Can I still purchase the new Winnipeg Humane Society plates?

Yes. Fans who own a different specialty license plate are still eligible to purchase the new Winnipeg Humane Society plates. You can even change the plates in between seasons at no extra charge.

However, because the plate numbers on the front and rear of your vehicle must match at all times, you will not be allowed to use the Winnipeg Humane Society plate and other specialty plates simultaneously (i.e. you cannot have a Winnipeg Humane Society plate on the front of your vehicle and a Winnipeg Jets plate on the rear).

Use them with your vehicle(s) or as a keepsake

If you are the registered owner of one or more vehicles that qualify, you can apply for Winnipeg Humane Society license plates for all of them. Only one set of Winnipeg Humane Society plates will be issued per vehicle.

Customers wanting to use the plates as a souvenir keepsake can still purchase them at a cost of $70.

Can the Winnipeg Humane Society plates be personalized?

No – Similar to other specialty licence plates, the Winnipeg Humane Society plates are a pre-established set of letters and numbers.

Need more information?

For specific questions about the Winnipeg Humane Society license plates, you can reach MPI at:

  • 204-985-7000 (in Winnipeg)
  • 1-800-665-2410 (toll-free outside Winnipeg)

Or you can simply visit your nearest Autopac agent.


]]>
Thu, 27 Mar 2014 14:01:54 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,353;WHS-License-Plates http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,353;WHS-License-Plates Posted in: News, Take-Action

Winnipeg Humane Society License Plates

Show your love of animals – adopt a brand new Winnipeg Humane Society specialty license plate!

 

Where can I get the plates?

Animal lovers can visit any Autopac agent to purchase their plates.

****NEWS ALERT****

 In only 2 days we have sold out the first batch and have over 350 back ordered.  Please don't wait to place your order or you may miss out on having the most lovable plate out there!

The plates are now on sale. Please visit your local Autopac or MPI location to place your order.  Customers can place an order and the plates will be sent to the broker or MPI location for customer pick up once the order has been processed. This process should only take a couple of days.

What vehicles qualify

All passenger vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, motorcycles, mopeds and farm trucks qualify for Winnipeg Humane Society licence plates. Commercial trucks and all other non-passenger vehicles do not qualify.

I already own a different specialty license plate. Can I still purchase the new Winnipeg Humane Society plates?

Yes. Fans who own a different specialty license plate are still eligible to purchase the new Winnipeg Humane Society plates. You can even change the plates in between seasons at no extra charge.

However, because the plate numbers on the front and rear of your vehicle must match at all times, you will not be allowed to use the Winnipeg Humane Society plate and other specialty plates simultaneously (i.e. you cannot have a Winnipeg Humane Society plate on the front of your vehicle and a Winnipeg Jets plate on the rear).

Use them with your vehicle(s) or as a keepsake

If you are the registered owner of one or more vehicles that qualify, you can apply for Winnipeg Humane Society license plates for all of them. Only one set of Winnipeg Humane Society plates will be issued per vehicle.

Customers wanting to use the plates as a souvenir keepsake can still purchase them at a cost of $70.

Can the Winnipeg Humane Society plates be personalized?

No – Similar to other specialty licence plates, the Winnipeg Humane Society plates are a pre-established set of letters and numbers.

Need more information?

For specific questions about the Winnipeg Humane Society license plates, you can reach MPI at:

  • 204-985-7000 (in Winnipeg)
  • 1-800-665-2410 (toll-free outside Winnipeg)

Or you can simply visit your nearest Autopac agent.


]]>
Help us reach our goal of 1001 Donations on March 16! Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

Get Ready for...

Log on, tune in, or visit us at The WHS Shelter - 45 Hurst Way

Iams 1001 Donations is an all-day radio/telethon to raise money for the over
8,000 animals who come to our shelter each year.

Join us on Shaw TV, 103.1 Virgin Radio, FAB 94.3, and QX 104.
You can also visit the shelter, our drive-thru donation station, or one of our
satellite locations at St. Vital Centre and Kildonan Place!


]]>
Mon, 10 Mar 2014 11:55:14 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,350;Help-us-reach-our-goal-of-1001-Donations-on-March-16 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,350;Help-us-reach-our-goal-of-1001-Donations-on-March-16 Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

Get Ready for...

Log on, tune in, or visit us at The WHS Shelter - 45 Hurst Way

Iams 1001 Donations is an all-day radio/telethon to raise money for the over
8,000 animals who come to our shelter each year.

Join us on Shaw TV, 103.1 Virgin Radio, FAB 94.3, and QX 104.
You can also visit the shelter, our drive-thru donation station, or one of our
satellite locations at St. Vital Centre and Kildonan Place!


]]>
The Celebrity Dog Bowl Auction is now open! Posted in: News, Event

What do you get for the pet lover who has everything? How about a beautiful, one-of-a-kind dog bowl personally autographed by your favourite celebrities!

We've partnered with Brush Fire Studio Contemporary Ceramic Studio for the first-ever Celebrity Dog Bowl Auction! We will be auctioning off these unique bowls online starting March 14th. Auction dates are March 14th to March 23rd.

A BIG thank-you to Brush Fire Studio for donating the bowls and decorating them so beautifully.

Click here to start bidding!

We have bowls signed by:

Rihanna
•Carrie Underwood
•Cesar Millan
•Glenn Close
•George Takei
•Gordon Lightfoot
•Jason Alexander
•Joan Rivers
•Paul Brandt
•Theo Fleury
•Martin Sheen
•Neil Young
•Rob Schneider
•Fleetwood Mac
•Diana Krall
•Hedley
•Jennifer Jones
•Rachel McAdams
•Larry the Cable Guy
•Bryan Adams


]]>
Fri, 07 Mar 2014 10:00:55 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,347;The-Celebrity-Dog-Bowl-Auction-is-now-open http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,347;The-Celebrity-Dog-Bowl-Auction-is-now-open Posted in: News, Event

What do you get for the pet lover who has everything? How about a beautiful, one-of-a-kind dog bowl personally autographed by your favourite celebrities!

We've partnered with Brush Fire Studio Contemporary Ceramic Studio for the first-ever Celebrity Dog Bowl Auction! We will be auctioning off these unique bowls online starting March 14th. Auction dates are March 14th to March 23rd.

A BIG thank-you to Brush Fire Studio for donating the bowls and decorating them so beautifully.

Click here to start bidding!

We have bowls signed by:

Rihanna
•Carrie Underwood
•Cesar Millan
•Glenn Close
•George Takei
•Gordon Lightfoot
•Jason Alexander
•Joan Rivers
•Paul Brandt
•Theo Fleury
•Martin Sheen
•Neil Young
•Rob Schneider
•Fleetwood Mac
•Diana Krall
•Hedley
•Jennifer Jones
•Rachel McAdams
•Larry the Cable Guy
•Bryan Adams


]]>
The Benefits of Senior Dogs

Benefits of Senior Dogs

by Luigi Aero
 
One of the saddest things is an old dog left in a shelter by an uncaring human family. Common excuses people use are that they don't have enough time for the dogs or that they are moving (although I have never heard of any state in the U.S. where dogs are illegal). In this disposable society we live in, some people actually dump their family dog in a shelter and walk out with a new puppy.  Imagine the fear, sadness and confusion that an old shelter dog faces.  Even worse, their time in the shelter is spent watching people walk past their cages, barely seeing them, instead rushing to the cute puppies.
 
Why would anyone consider sharing their home with an older dog, when there are so many younger ones available?
 
By adopting an older dog, you can make a statement about compassion and the value of all life at all ages, as well as register a protest against the indiscriminate and inhumane breeding of dogs, whether it is for profit or to "teach the children about birth." And, of course, just as a puppy has his whole life ahead of him, so does an older dog have the rest of his life in front of him. You can give that older dog the best years of his life while at the same time bringing a wonderful addition into your family.
 
1. What You See Is What You Get
 
Older dogs are open books—from the start, you’ll know important things like their full-grown size, personality and grooming requirements. All this information makes it easier to pick the right dog and forge that instant love connection that will last a lifetime. If you’re not so into surprises, an older dog is for you!
 
2. Easy to Train
 
Think you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Hogwash! Older dogs are great at focusing on you—and on the task at hand—because they’re calmer than youngsters. Plus, all those years of experience reading humans can help them quickly figure out how to do what you’re asking.
 
3. Seniors are Super-Loving
 
These dogs love you—and those of you who adopted dogs already in their golden years told us how devoted and grateful they are. It's an instant bond that cannot be topped!
 
4. They’re Not a 24-7 Job
 
Grownup dogs don’t require the constant monitoring puppies do, leaving you with more freedom to do your own thing. If you have young children, or just value your “me time,” this is definitely a bonus.
 
5. They Settle in Quickly
 
Older dogs have been around the block and already learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.They’ll be part of the family in no time!
 
6. Fewer Messes
 
Your floors, shoes and furniture will thank you for adopting a senior pooch! Older dogs are likely to already be housetrained—and even if they’re not, they have the physical and mental abilities to pick it up really fast (unlike puppies). With their teething years far behind them, seniors also are much less likely to be destructive chewers.
 
7. You Won’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew
 
There are those who yearn for a doggie friend of their own, but hold back because they worry what might happen in their lives in the years to come. And they are wise to do so—a puppy or young dog can be anywhere from an 8- to 20-year responsibility, which is not appropriate for the very elderly or those with certain long-term future plans. Providing a loving home for a dog in her golden years is not a less serious commitment, but it can be a shorter one.
 
8. They Enjoy Easy Livin’
 
Couch potato, know thyself! Please consider a canine retiree rather than a high-energy young dog who will run you ragged. Not that older dogs don’t require any exercise—they do—but they’re not going to need, or want, to run a marathon every day.
 
9. A Good Night's Sleep
 
Older dogs let you get a good night's sleep because they're accustomed to human schedules and don't generally need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.
 
10. Time for Yourself
 
Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don't make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.
 
11. Companionship
 
Senior dogs whose lives have been disrupted in their later years have so much love to give and like nothing better than giving it. They tend to rely heavily on their owner for companionship and therefore bond very quickly. The desire to reciprocate the companionship given to them is very strong.
 
12. Seniors for Seniors
 
An attractive concept used by many animal rescue/humane organizations, an older dog can be successfully matched up with a senior citizen. Lifestyle requirements of an older person often mix well with the lifestyle of an older dog. It's a win/win situation, resulting in quality retirement companionship for both.
 
13. Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks?
 
You sure can. While it may take an older dog a bit longer to adjust to new situations, they can; they will; they do. Their only requirement is to be given the opportunity. Generally, older dogs are calmer and therefore will focus much easier on what you are trying to teach them.
 
14. Save a Life, Be a Hero
 
At shelters, older dogs are often the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized.
Saving an animal’s life offers an unparalleled emotional return on your investment,
and you’ll feel the rewards every day you spend together.
 
15. They’re BEAUTIFUL!  Inside and out.

 

There are some lovely success stories about adopting senior dogs on The WHS blog - check them out by clicking here!


]]>
Fri, 21 Feb 2014 11:06:13 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,345;The-Benefits-of-Senior-Dogs http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,345;The-Benefits-of-Senior-Dogs

Benefits of Senior Dogs

by Luigi Aero
 
One of the saddest things is an old dog left in a shelter by an uncaring human family. Common excuses people use are that they don't have enough time for the dogs or that they are moving (although I have never heard of any state in the U.S. where dogs are illegal). In this disposable society we live in, some people actually dump their family dog in a shelter and walk out with a new puppy.  Imagine the fear, sadness and confusion that an old shelter dog faces.  Even worse, their time in the shelter is spent watching people walk past their cages, barely seeing them, instead rushing to the cute puppies.
 
Why would anyone consider sharing their home with an older dog, when there are so many younger ones available?
 
By adopting an older dog, you can make a statement about compassion and the value of all life at all ages, as well as register a protest against the indiscriminate and inhumane breeding of dogs, whether it is for profit or to "teach the children about birth." And, of course, just as a puppy has his whole life ahead of him, so does an older dog have the rest of his life in front of him. You can give that older dog the best years of his life while at the same time bringing a wonderful addition into your family.
 
1. What You See Is What You Get
 
Older dogs are open books—from the start, you’ll know important things like their full-grown size, personality and grooming requirements. All this information makes it easier to pick the right dog and forge that instant love connection that will last a lifetime. If you’re not so into surprises, an older dog is for you!
 
2. Easy to Train
 
Think you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Hogwash! Older dogs are great at focusing on you—and on the task at hand—because they’re calmer than youngsters. Plus, all those years of experience reading humans can help them quickly figure out how to do what you’re asking.
 
3. Seniors are Super-Loving
 
These dogs love you—and those of you who adopted dogs already in their golden years told us how devoted and grateful they are. It's an instant bond that cannot be topped!
 
4. They’re Not a 24-7 Job
 
Grownup dogs don’t require the constant monitoring puppies do, leaving you with more freedom to do your own thing. If you have young children, or just value your “me time,” this is definitely a bonus.
 
5. They Settle in Quickly
 
Older dogs have been around the block and already learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.They’ll be part of the family in no time!
 
6. Fewer Messes
 
Your floors, shoes and furniture will thank you for adopting a senior pooch! Older dogs are likely to already be housetrained—and even if they’re not, they have the physical and mental abilities to pick it up really fast (unlike puppies). With their teething years far behind them, seniors also are much less likely to be destructive chewers.
 
7. You Won’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew
 
There are those who yearn for a doggie friend of their own, but hold back because they worry what might happen in their lives in the years to come. And they are wise to do so—a puppy or young dog can be anywhere from an 8- to 20-year responsibility, which is not appropriate for the very elderly or those with certain long-term future plans. Providing a loving home for a dog in her golden years is not a less serious commitment, but it can be a shorter one.
 
8. They Enjoy Easy Livin’
 
Couch potato, know thyself! Please consider a canine retiree rather than a high-energy young dog who will run you ragged. Not that older dogs don’t require any exercise—they do—but they’re not going to need, or want, to run a marathon every day.
 
9. A Good Night's Sleep
 
Older dogs let you get a good night's sleep because they're accustomed to human schedules and don't generally need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.
 
10. Time for Yourself
 
Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don't make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.
 
11. Companionship
 
Senior dogs whose lives have been disrupted in their later years have so much love to give and like nothing better than giving it. They tend to rely heavily on their owner for companionship and therefore bond very quickly. The desire to reciprocate the companionship given to them is very strong.
 
12. Seniors for Seniors
 
An attractive concept used by many animal rescue/humane organizations, an older dog can be successfully matched up with a senior citizen. Lifestyle requirements of an older person often mix well with the lifestyle of an older dog. It's a win/win situation, resulting in quality retirement companionship for both.
 
13. Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks?
 
You sure can. While it may take an older dog a bit longer to adjust to new situations, they can; they will; they do. Their only requirement is to be given the opportunity. Generally, older dogs are calmer and therefore will focus much easier on what you are trying to teach them.
 
14. Save a Life, Be a Hero
 
At shelters, older dogs are often the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized.
Saving an animal’s life offers an unparalleled emotional return on your investment,
and you’ll feel the rewards every day you spend together.
 
15. They’re BEAUTIFUL!  Inside and out.

 

There are some lovely success stories about adopting senior dogs on The WHS blog - check them out by clicking here!


]]>
Used Book & Movie Sale This Weekend Posted in: News, Event

Join us for a giant used book and movie sale, this Sunday and Monday at The Winnipeg Humane Society!

When:             Sunday, February 16 & Monday, February 17, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Who:               Pets love to curl up with us when we sit down to read a book or watch a movie. So how about restocking your book, music and movie collection with us? Start by attending The Winnipeg Humane Society's Used Book and Movie Sale! 

Why:               Proceeds from the sale go towards helping the 9,000 animals that come through The Winnipeg Humane Society each year, providing each one with a behavioural assessment, necessary medical treatment and spay or neutering. The Used Book & Movie Sale helps support the 400 animals The WHS may be caring for at any given time, as well as the community services offered.


]]>
Tue, 11 Feb 2014 11:57:30 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,343;Used-Book-&-Movie-Sale-This-Weekend http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,343;Used-Book-&-Movie-Sale-This-Weekend Posted in: News, Event

Join us for a giant used book and movie sale, this Sunday and Monday at The Winnipeg Humane Society!

When:             Sunday, February 16 & Monday, February 17, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Who:               Pets love to curl up with us when we sit down to read a book or watch a movie. So how about restocking your book, music and movie collection with us? Start by attending The Winnipeg Humane Society's Used Book and Movie Sale! 

Why:               Proceeds from the sale go towards helping the 9,000 animals that come through The Winnipeg Humane Society each year, providing each one with a behavioural assessment, necessary medical treatment and spay or neutering. The Used Book & Movie Sale helps support the 400 animals The WHS may be caring for at any given time, as well as the community services offered.


]]>
Beat the Heat is fully booked! Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

Great news - the Beat the Heat program for February is fully booked! This means there will be a lot less homeless cats on Winnipeg streets this year. The WHS will complete a whopping 500 spay surgeries this month through Beat the Heat. Thank you all for your support! This wonderful initiative is funded by Petsmart Charities.

Did you know that cats can have litters multiple times per year? Spaying and neutering is the best way to fight Winnipeg's cat overpopulation crisis. If you have a cat that needs to be fixed, The Winnipeg Humane Society has an ongoing program called SNAP - the spay and neuter assistance program. Low income families can apply for SNAP to have their cat spayed or neutered for around $30 within the City of Winnipeg. For more information, visit SNAP on our website or call the SNAP line at 204-888-SNAP (7627).


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Thu, 06 Feb 2014 12:50:59 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,342;Beat-the-Heat-is-fully-booked http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,342;Beat-the-Heat-is-fully-booked Posted in: News, Take-Action, Event

Great news - the Beat the Heat program for February is fully booked! This means there will be a lot less homeless cats on Winnipeg streets this year. The WHS will complete a whopping 500 spay surgeries this month through Beat the Heat. Thank you all for your support! This wonderful initiative is funded by Petsmart Charities.

Did you know that cats can have litters multiple times per year? Spaying and neutering is the best way to fight Winnipeg's cat overpopulation crisis. If you have a cat that needs to be fixed, The Winnipeg Humane Society has an ongoing program called SNAP - the spay and neuter assistance program. Low income families can apply for SNAP to have their cat spayed or neutered for around $30 within the City of Winnipeg. For more information, visit SNAP on our website or call the SNAP line at 204-888-SNAP (7627).


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Adopting a pet? Posted in: Other, Take-Action

Adoption Requirements

  • Provide proof of address with identification such as driver's license 
  • Complete animal adoption questionnaire
  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  •  If needed, you may bring your dog to the shelter to introduce him or her to a dog you are considering for adoption
  • Please see Adoption Fees for pricing information.

General Info

  • All dogs 6 months and older are assessed by behavior specialists 
  • Adopted animals are monitored for a 14 day health period to address medical concerns
  • All animals are evaluated based on their health, known history, and temperament 
  • Animals are available on a first-come, first-serve basis

Along with cats, dogs, and rabbits, we sometimes have other animals available such as birds, hamsters, and various rodents.

One of the goals of The Winnipeg Humane Society is to place animals in a responsible and loving permanent home. Weekends at the shelter are very busy so try to come on a weekday to pick out your new pet. For a list of our hours of operation, please see Location and Hours.


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Tue, 04 Feb 2014 10:41:17 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,341;Adopting-a-pet http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,341;Adopting-a-pet Posted in: Other, Take-Action

Adoption Requirements

  • Provide proof of address with identification such as driver's license 
  • Complete animal adoption questionnaire
  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  •  If needed, you may bring your dog to the shelter to introduce him or her to a dog you are considering for adoption
  • Please see Adoption Fees for pricing information.

General Info

  • All dogs 6 months and older are assessed by behavior specialists 
  • Adopted animals are monitored for a 14 day health period to address medical concerns
  • All animals are evaluated based on their health, known history, and temperament 
  • Animals are available on a first-come, first-serve basis

Along with cats, dogs, and rabbits, we sometimes have other animals available such as birds, hamsters, and various rodents.

One of the goals of The Winnipeg Humane Society is to place animals in a responsible and loving permanent home. Weekends at the shelter are very busy so try to come on a weekday to pick out your new pet. For a list of our hours of operation, please see Location and Hours.


]]>
Adorable adoptables... on YouTube! Posted in: Other, Animal-Feature

WHS animals are STARS! See some of our adorable adoptables showing off their stunning good lucks and sparkling personalities for the camera, in a YouTube series of WHS adoptions promos. A few of these fabulous videos are available below - check out our Videos page for more!

Smudge- WHS Adoptions Series

Henry- WHS Adoptions Series

Maxine- WHS Adoptions Series

Bear- WHS Adoptions Series

)

Coral- WHS Adoptions Series

)

Buddy- WHS Adoptions Series

Cora- WHS Adoptions Series

Boots- WHS Adoptions Series

Kitchi- WHS Adoptions Series

Tofu- WHS Adoptions Series

 

Cody- WHS Adoptions Series

 

Visit The WHS on YouTube for more videos of WHS animals, promotions and events!


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Thu, 30 Jan 2014 16:22:30 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,340;Adorable-adoptables-on-YouTube http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,340;Adorable-adoptables-on-YouTube Posted in: Other, Animal-Feature

WHS animals are STARS! See some of our adorable adoptables showing off their stunning good lucks and sparkling personalities for the camera, in a YouTube series of WHS adoptions promos. A few of these fabulous videos are available below - check out our Videos page for more!

Smudge- WHS Adoptions Series

Henry- WHS Adoptions Series

Maxine- WHS Adoptions Series

Bear- WHS Adoptions Series

)

Coral- WHS Adoptions Series

)

Buddy- WHS Adoptions Series

Cora- WHS Adoptions Series

Boots- WHS Adoptions Series

Kitchi- WHS Adoptions Series

Tofu- WHS Adoptions Series

 

Cody- WHS Adoptions Series

 

Visit The WHS on YouTube for more videos of WHS animals, promotions and events!


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The Winter Newsletter is here

Download a PDF of one of our latest newsletters.

 

2014 Winter Newsletter

Featuring:

  • How to understand what your dog is saying to you
  • Help your bunnies become buddies
  • Your photos: cat photo contest
  • And more!


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Thu, 23 Jan 2014 12:29:32 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,339;The-Winter-Newsletter-is-here http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,339;The-Winter-Newsletter-is-here

Download a PDF of one of our latest newsletters.

 

2014 Winter Newsletter

Featuring:

  • How to understand what your dog is saying to you
  • Help your bunnies become buddies
  • Your photos: cat photo contest
  • And more!


]]>
WHS helps cat owners "Beat the Heat" this February Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action, Event

The Winnipeg Humane Society invites cat owners to get their female cat spayed for only $20 this February. Cat owners can call 204-888-7627 to book an appointment today. The goal of the “Beat the Heat” campaign is to spay 500 cats throughout the month to help fight the cat overpopulation crisis. Beat the Heat is funded by PetSmart Charities of Canada.

“Cats can have several litters per year,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health. “By encouraging pet owners to fix them this February, before they come into their first heat, we could prevent thousands of unwanted litters.”

Spay surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range between $125 and $225. The WHS offers a subsidized spay and neuter program for Winnipeggers on low-income to help keep unwanted litters off the streets. Shelters are overcrowded and too many cats remain homeless.

“Beat the Heat specifically targets female cats as they carry the litters,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “This way we minimize how many cats overwhelm shelters during spring and summer, the peak breeding season.”

Cats should be a minimum of four months of age, in good health, should be under the care of a veterinarian and be up to date with vaccinations. Cats must be transported to and from their appointment in a pet carrier.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Mon, 06 Jan 2014 12:16:09 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,336;WHS-helps-cat-owners-Beat-the-Heat-this-February http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,336;WHS-helps-cat-owners-Beat-the-Heat-this-February Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action, Event

The Winnipeg Humane Society invites cat owners to get their female cat spayed for only $20 this February. Cat owners can call 204-888-7627 to book an appointment today. The goal of the “Beat the Heat” campaign is to spay 500 cats throughout the month to help fight the cat overpopulation crisis. Beat the Heat is funded by PetSmart Charities of Canada.

“Cats can have several litters per year,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health. “By encouraging pet owners to fix them this February, before they come into their first heat, we could prevent thousands of unwanted litters.”

Spay surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range between $125 and $225. The WHS offers a subsidized spay and neuter program for Winnipeggers on low-income to help keep unwanted litters off the streets. Shelters are overcrowded and too many cats remain homeless.

“Beat the Heat specifically targets female cats as they carry the litters,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “This way we minimize how many cats overwhelm shelters during spring and summer, the peak breeding season.”

Cats should be a minimum of four months of age, in good health, should be under the care of a veterinarian and be up to date with vaccinations. Cats must be transported to and from their appointment in a pet carrier.

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Winnipeg Humane Society seeks Used Books and Movies Posted in: News, Event

The Winnipeg Humane Society is looking for donations of gently used items for an upcoming Book and Movie Sale. Donations can be dropped off at the WHS reception desk as of January 13, 2014. The deadline for accepting donations is Monday, February 10.

Please help us with the sorting process so we can present the best possible sale to raise money for animals! Here's a list of what we're looking for:

  • Novels, non-fiction, and childrens' books in good condition.
  • CDs, DVDs, and Blu-rays are great.
  • Computer and video games (PlayStation, X-box, Wii) are very welcome.

WE ARE NOT ACCEPTING VHS MOVIES!

Here are some things we cannot accept:

  • Dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks.
  • No Time Life series, please.
  • We cannot sell magazines or manuals of any kind.
  • We cannot sell Reader's Digest.
  • No former library books.
  • We cannot accept equipment (VCR, DVD, TVs, computers or gaming systems)

Remember, the better the condition, the better they will sell! Items with torn covers, broken spines, missing pages, or scratched discs will not be accepted.

The sale takes place at the Winnipeg Humane Society, 45 Hurst Way, on February 16 & 17 (Louis Riel Day) from 12-6 p.m.

Here 4U Inc have kindly volunteered their services to pick up donations for individuals who do not have access to a vehicle, one day a week. Please contact info@Here4U.ca or call 204-414-5590.


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Mon, 30 Dec 2013 00:00:00 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,271;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-seeks-Used-Books-and-Movies http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,271;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-seeks-Used-Books-and-Movies Posted in: News, Event

The Winnipeg Humane Society is looking for donations of gently used items for an upcoming Book and Movie Sale. Donations can be dropped off at the WHS reception desk as of January 13, 2014. The deadline for accepting donations is Monday, February 10.

Please help us with the sorting process so we can present the best possible sale to raise money for animals! Here's a list of what we're looking for:

  • Novels, non-fiction, and childrens' books in good condition.
  • CDs, DVDs, and Blu-rays are great.
  • Computer and video games (PlayStation, X-box, Wii) are very welcome.

WE ARE NOT ACCEPTING VHS MOVIES!

Here are some things we cannot accept:

  • Dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks.
  • No Time Life series, please.
  • We cannot sell magazines or manuals of any kind.
  • We cannot sell Reader's Digest.
  • No former library books.
  • We cannot accept equipment (VCR, DVD, TVs, computers or gaming systems)

Remember, the better the condition, the better they will sell! Items with torn covers, broken spines, missing pages, or scratched discs will not be accepted.

The sale takes place at the Winnipeg Humane Society, 45 Hurst Way, on February 16 & 17 (Louis Riel Day) from 12-6 p.m.

Here 4U Inc have kindly volunteered their services to pick up donations for individuals who do not have access to a vehicle, one day a week. Please contact info@Here4U.ca or call 204-414-5590.


]]>
Broken shoulder doesn’t break foster parent’s spirit! Pet Grooming Tips

Pet Grooming Tips

Follow these steps to help keep your pet clean and content:

  • Brushing your pet every day will keep their hair in good, clean condition while spreading natural oils throughout their coat. It also makes them look better and provides valuable bonding time for you and your pet! Another perk of brushing your pet daily is the reduction of pet hair in the home.
  • Trimming your pet’s nails frequently is important. There are a variety of animal nail-clippers available. If you are uncomfortable with trimming your pet's nails yourself, your vet or groomer should be able to do it at a fairly low cost.
  • Ears need to be checked on a regular basis for signs of infection that can lead to hearing loss. The skin inside the ears should be pale pink. If there is a foul odour, unusual or excessive discharge, redness or brown/black skin, see your veterinarian.
  • Pets get cavities, too, so don’t forget to clean your pet's teeth with pet toothpaste or give them special dental chews.
  • Bath your pet no more than once a month, but enough that he or she will be free of dirt, fur-mats and foul odours. Remember to use shampoo that is specially formulated for your pet.


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Mon, 25 Nov 2013 08:48:08 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,330;Pet-Grooming-Tips http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,330;Pet-Grooming-Tips

Pet Grooming Tips

Follow these steps to help keep your pet clean and content:

  • Brushing your pet every day will keep their hair in good, clean condition while spreading natural oils throughout their coat. It also makes them look better and provides valuable bonding time for you and your pet! Another perk of brushing your pet daily is the reduction of pet hair in the home.
  • Trimming your pet’s nails frequently is important. There are a variety of animal nail-clippers available. If you are uncomfortable with trimming your pet's nails yourself, your vet or groomer should be able to do it at a fairly low cost.
  • Ears need to be checked on a regular basis for signs of infection that can lead to hearing loss. The skin inside the ears should be pale pink. If there is a foul odour, unusual or excessive discharge, redness or brown/black skin, see your veterinarian.
  • Pets get cavities, too, so don’t forget to clean your pet's teeth with pet toothpaste or give them special dental chews.
  • Bath your pet no more than once a month, but enough that he or she will be free of dirt, fur-mats and foul odours. Remember to use shampoo that is specially formulated for your pet.


]]>
Free Felines this Friday at The Winnipeg Humane Society! Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action, Event

1,565 stray and abandoned cats and kittens have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society since Sept. 1. There are currently more than 240 cats and kittens in The WHS’s care and the shelter will soon be at capacity. Homes are needed for the more than 100 cats that arrive at the shelter every week.

On Friday, Nov. 22, all cats four months and older will be adopted for free. Kittens under four months will be $50 to adopt. The normal adoption fee for kittens is $179.

“The cat overpopulation crisis is ongoing and not enough cats are getting spayed or neutered,” said Judy Dean, WHS Adoptions Manager. “We are seeing far too many stray cats and kittens come to The Winnipeg Humane Society. This promotion will help these cats find loving homes.”

While The WHS offers programs like SNAP (subsidized spay and neuter assistance program) and TNR (Trap Neuter Release) to fight Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis, the shelter still experiences an influx of cats every winter.

“As the cold weather hits, more and more cats end up at The WHS as people start bringing in stray or wandering cats that have been in their neighbourhoods for months,” said Dean. “We’re helping these cats find homes so they don’t have to brave the elements this winter.”

Adoption fees will be waived, but the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All cats adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, 30 day Petplan health insurance and a two-week health check.

###

 The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.

­


]]>
Tue, 19 Nov 2013 08:33:30 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,329;Free-Felines-this-Friday-at-The-Winnipeg-Humane-Society http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,329;Free-Felines-this-Friday-at-The-Winnipeg-Humane-Society Posted in: News, Press-Release, Take-Action, Event

1,565 stray and abandoned cats and kittens have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society since Sept. 1. There are currently more than 240 cats and kittens in The WHS’s care and the shelter will soon be at capacity. Homes are needed for the more than 100 cats that arrive at the shelter every week.

On Friday, Nov. 22, all cats four months and older will be adopted for free. Kittens under four months will be $50 to adopt. The normal adoption fee for kittens is $179.

“The cat overpopulation crisis is ongoing and not enough cats are getting spayed or neutered,” said Judy Dean, WHS Adoptions Manager. “We are seeing far too many stray cats and kittens come to The Winnipeg Humane Society. This promotion will help these cats find loving homes.”

While The WHS offers programs like SNAP (subsidized spay and neuter assistance program) and TNR (Trap Neuter Release) to fight Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis, the shelter still experiences an influx of cats every winter.

“As the cold weather hits, more and more cats end up at The WHS as people start bringing in stray or wandering cats that have been in their neighbourhoods for months,” said Dean. “We’re helping these cats find homes so they don’t have to brave the elements this winter.”

Adoption fees will be waived, but the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All cats adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, 30 day Petplan health insurance and a two-week health check.

###

 The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca.

­


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Show & Save Books now available!

Pick up a Show & Save book from our gift shop for only $20! These great books are filled with coupons for restaurants and stores throughout Winnipeg, and at $20 they pay for themselves.

Books include $60 worth of savings at SuperStore!

Pick one up at our gift shop, located at The Winnipeg Humane Socety - 45 Hurst Way.

Show & Save has been helping non-profit groups raise money and people save money since 1991.


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Fri, 01 Nov 2013 15:24:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,326;Show-&-Save-Books-now-available http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,326;Show-&-Save-Books-now-available

Pick up a Show & Save book from our gift shop for only $20! These great books are filled with coupons for restaurants and stores throughout Winnipeg, and at $20 they pay for themselves.

Books include $60 worth of savings at SuperStore!

Pick one up at our gift shop, located at The Winnipeg Humane Socety - 45 Hurst Way.

Show & Save has been helping non-profit groups raise money and people save money since 1991.


]]>
Summer pet safety Posted in: News, Take-Action

Summer Pet Safety

Summer is a time for both you and your pet to enjoy the sunshine and outdoors, but along with the fun, the season brings situations that could harm your furry friend. Here are some tips to keep everyone safe this summer:

  • Don't leave pets in parked cars for any period of time. On a warm day, in the shade with the windows cracked, the temperature inside a vehicle can reach 120° in only minutes. Heatstroke, brain damage and even death are real possibilities as dogs and cats can't perspire and only dispel heat by panting and through the pads of their feet. If you see an animal in a parked car during the summer, alert the management of the business closest to the vehicle. If the owner does not return promptly, call local animal control or the police.
  • It is very dangerous, and in some places illegal, to drive with a dog in the back of a pick-up truck. Flying debris can cause serious injury, or the dog may be unintentionally thrown into traffic if the driver suddenly hits the brakes, swerves, or is hit by another car. Dogs should ride in the cab (in a crate or wearing a seat belt harness designed for dogs) or in a secured crate in the bed of the truck.
  • Plant food, fertilizer, and insecticides can be fatal if your pet ingests them. In addition, more than 700 plants can produce physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals.
  • Keep barbeque essentials such as matches or lighter fluid safely away from your pets.
  • Dog bites rise during the summer months when people and their pets spend more time outside. Spaying or neutering your dog reduces the likelihood that he will bite and provides many other health benefits. 
  • Make sure your pet is always wearing a collar and identification tag. If you are separated from your pet, an ID tag may very well be his or her ticket home.
  • Check with your veterinarian to see if your pets should be taking heartworm prevention medication. Heartworm disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, can be fatal in both dogs and cats.
  • Pets and pools can equal disaster. Prevent free access to pools and always supervise a pet in a pool. 
  • Provide plenty of water and shade for your pets while they're enjoying the great outdoors so they can stay cool.
  • If you plan on traveling with your pet during the summer, take the time to prepare for your furry friends in advance. Many airlines have summer pet embargoes, and most trains and ships do not allow pets other than service animals.
  • Pets need exercise even when it is hot, but extra care needs to be taken with older dogs, short-nosed dogs, and those with thick coats. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours. Keep in mind that asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws.
  • Another summertime threat is fleas and ticks. Use only flea and tick treatments recommended by your veterinarian. Some over-the-counter flea and tick products can be toxic, even when used according to instructions. Click here for instructions on how to safely remove ticks from your pet.
  • Pets can get sunburned too, and your pet may require sunscreen on his or her nose and ear tips. Pets with light-coloured noses or light-colored fur on their ears are particularly vulnerable to sunburn and skin cancer. Never apply sunscreen or insect repellant to your pet that is not labelled specifically for use on animals.
  • Don't take your pets to crowded summer events such as concerts or fairs. The loud noises and crowds, combined with the heat, can be stressful and dangerous for pets. For your pet's well being, leave him or her at home.

No Hot Pets


The summer can be a wonderful time for you and your pet. It’s also a time where you need to be careful of the dangers surrounding your animal.  You can help spread the word by sharing how deadly it is to leave your pet in your vehicle. No Hot Pets is a campaign encouraging pet owners to take their pet with them when they park their car. Share this message and take the pledge today! Let’s have no hot pets this summer! Take the pledge at nohotpets.ca.




]]>
Tue, 15 Oct 2013 11:16:22 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,321;Summer-pet-safety http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,321;Summer-pet-safety Posted in: News, Take-Action

Summer Pet Safety

Summer is a time for both you and your pet to enjoy the sunshine and outdoors, but along with the fun, the season brings situations that could harm your furry friend. Here are some tips to keep everyone safe this summer:

  • Don't leave pets in parked cars for any period of time. On a warm day, in the shade with the windows cracked, the temperature inside a vehicle can reach 120° in only minutes. Heatstroke, brain damage and even death are real possibilities as dogs and cats can't perspire and only dispel heat by panting and through the pads of their feet. If you see an animal in a parked car during the summer, alert the management of the business closest to the vehicle. If the owner does not return promptly, call local animal control or the police.
  • It is very dangerous, and in some places illegal, to drive with a dog in the back of a pick-up truck. Flying debris can cause serious injury, or the dog may be unintentionally thrown into traffic if the driver suddenly hits the brakes, swerves, or is hit by another car. Dogs should ride in the cab (in a crate or wearing a seat belt harness designed for dogs) or in a secured crate in the bed of the truck.
  • Plant food, fertilizer, and insecticides can be fatal if your pet ingests them. In addition, more than 700 plants can produce physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals.
  • Keep barbeque essentials such as matches or lighter fluid safely away from your pets.
  • Dog bites rise during the summer months when people and their pets spend more time outside. Spaying or neutering your dog reduces the likelihood that he will bite and provides many other health benefits. 
  • Make sure your pet is always wearing a collar and identification tag. If you are separated from your pet, an ID tag may very well be his or her ticket home.
  • Check with your veterinarian to see if your pets should be taking heartworm prevention medication. Heartworm disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, can be fatal in both dogs and cats.
  • Pets and pools can equal disaster. Prevent free access to pools and always supervise a pet in a pool. 
  • Provide plenty of water and shade for your pets while they're enjoying the great outdoors so they can stay cool.
  • If you plan on traveling with your pet during the summer, take the time to prepare for your furry friends in advance. Many airlines have summer pet embargoes, and most trains and ships do not allow pets other than service animals.
  • Pets need exercise even when it is hot, but extra care needs to be taken with older dogs, short-nosed dogs, and those with thick coats. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours. Keep in mind that asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws.
  • Another summertime threat is fleas and ticks. Use only flea and tick treatments recommended by your veterinarian. Some over-the-counter flea and tick products can be toxic, even when used according to instructions. Click here for instructions on how to safely remove ticks from your pet.
  • Pets can get sunburned too, and your pet may require sunscreen on his or her nose and ear tips. Pets with light-coloured noses or light-colored fur on their ears are particularly vulnerable to sunburn and skin cancer. Never apply sunscreen or insect repellant to your pet that is not labelled specifically for use on animals.
  • Don't take your pets to crowded summer events such as concerts or fairs. The loud noises and crowds, combined with the heat, can be stressful and dangerous for pets. For your pet's well being, leave him or her at home.

No Hot Pets


The summer can be a wonderful time for you and your pet. It’s also a time where you need to be careful of the dangers surrounding your animal.  You can help spread the word by sharing how deadly it is to leave your pet in your vehicle. No Hot Pets is a campaign encouraging pet owners to take their pet with them when they park their car. Share this message and take the pledge today! Let’s have no hot pets this summer! Take the pledge at nohotpets.ca.




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Get your WHS 2014 calendar today!

Don't miss out this year! Get your full-size, 13-month WHS calendar today!

Donate online, and we will send you our WHS calendar in the mail. Donations of $20 or more are tax receiptable.

If you prefer to place your order by phone, please call 204-982-2041.


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Thu, 03 Oct 2013 10:42:13 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,317;Get-your-WHS-2014-calendar-today http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,317;Get-your-WHS-2014-calendar-today

Don't miss out this year! Get your full-size, 13-month WHS calendar today!

Donate online, and we will send you our WHS calendar in the mail. Donations of $20 or more are tax receiptable.

If you prefer to place your order by phone, please call 204-982-2041.


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The Fall Newsletter is here!

Our 2013 Fall Newsletter is now online! Download a PDF of our current newsletter.

Featuring:

  • Pet Loss Support
  • Happy Tail: Jaspurr the Wonder Cat
  • The Ghosts in Our Machine: Documentary review and interview with film-makers
  • How to Keep an Under-Stimulated Cat More Active
  • And more!

Cover photograph by Frank Adam of Adam York Photography.


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Mon, 16 Sep 2013 11:12:13 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,312;The-Fall-Newsletter-is-here http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,312;The-Fall-Newsletter-is-here

Our 2013 Fall Newsletter is now online! Download a PDF of our current newsletter.

Featuring:

  • Pet Loss Support
  • Happy Tail: Jaspurr the Wonder Cat
  • The Ghosts in Our Machine: Documentary review and interview with film-makers
  • How to Keep an Under-Stimulated Cat More Active
  • And more!

Cover photograph by Frank Adam of Adam York Photography.


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Meet your Match! Posted in: News, Other

Think of it like a dating service - but with cats!

Meet Your Match is program that makes it fun and easy to find the kitty of your dreams in just a few short steps.

The program assigns each adoptable cat one of nine personality types—or ‘feline-alities’—through a set of behavioural assessments. Each feline-ality is put into one of three colour groups.

Adopters are then asked to fill out a survey about themselves; is your home more like a carnival or a library? How do you feel about playing the ‘chase the human ankles’ game with your cat? What are you truly looking for in a new pet?

This survey reveals what colour group you and your family would best ‘mesh’ with. As each adoptable cat is with a big, bright coloured sign, you are then free to explore the shelter to find your perfect match.

Take the survey here!

The Colours in a Nutshell

Green cats will quickly adapt to new situations and aren’t afraid to party all night and be the centre of attention.

 

 

Purple cats may need a little more time to adjust to a new home but can be super cuddly or big fans of purrs and head-butts.

 

 

Orange kitties are just classic, quintessential cats. They like to bug you while you’re on the computer, nap in the closet or watch a good movie with you.

 

 

Meet all nine feline-alities.

Quick Facts

  • You are still free to mix-and-match colours. The program in no way requires you to choose a cat with a particular feline-ality.
  • The program is designed and owned by the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and has already been tested at several shelters. (Visit the ASPCA website for more information on the organization.)
  • Test runs of the program found a 40-45% increase in adoptions.
  • Test runs of the program also found a 45-50% decrease in returns and euthanasia.

Click here for adoption hours and directions or call 204-982-2035 for more information.


]]>
Wed, 21 Aug 2013 16:02:23 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,310;Meet-your-Match http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,310;Meet-your-Match Posted in: News, Other

Think of it like a dating service - but with cats!

Meet Your Match is program that makes it fun and easy to find the kitty of your dreams in just a few short steps.

The program assigns each adoptable cat one of nine personality types—or ‘feline-alities’—through a set of behavioural assessments. Each feline-ality is put into one of three colour groups.

Adopters are then asked to fill out a survey about themselves; is your home more like a carnival or a library? How do you feel about playing the ‘chase the human ankles’ game with your cat? What are you truly looking for in a new pet?

This survey reveals what colour group you and your family would best ‘mesh’ with. As each adoptable cat is with a big, bright coloured sign, you are then free to explore the shelter to find your perfect match.

Take the survey here!

The Colours in a Nutshell

Green cats will quickly adapt to new situations and aren’t afraid to party all night and be the centre of attention.

 

 

Purple cats may need a little more time to adjust to a new home but can be super cuddly or big fans of purrs and head-butts.

 

 

Orange kitties are just classic, quintessential cats. They like to bug you while you’re on the computer, nap in the closet or watch a good movie with you.

 

 

Meet all nine feline-alities.

Quick Facts

  • You are still free to mix-and-match colours. The program in no way requires you to choose a cat with a particular feline-ality.
  • The program is designed and owned by the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and has already been tested at several shelters. (Visit the ASPCA website for more information on the organization.)
  • Test runs of the program found a 40-45% increase in adoptions.
  • Test runs of the program also found a 45-50% decrease in returns and euthanasia.

Click here for adoption hours and directions or call 204-982-2035 for more information.


]]>
Winnipeg Humane Society waiving cat adoption fees as hundreds of cats look for homes Posted in: News, Press-Release

(WINNIPEG)— Over 1,750 stray and abandoned cats have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society between May 1 and Aug. 11. Around 600 have come through the shelter doors in July alone. These numbers are expected to increase in the coming weeks and the shelter is presently at capacity. The WHS is having an event where adoption fees are waived in order to make space for the approximately 220 cats that arrive weekly.

On Friday, August 16 from 11 am to 7 pm, there will be no fees to adopt a cat over four months of age. Kittens under four months will be $25 to adopt. The normal adoption fee for kittens is $179.

“We’re seeing too many cats coming into the shelter, and we simply do not have the space to house them all,” said Judy Dean, Adoptions Manager at The WHS. “We’d much rather see these cats go to loving homes than face the alternative.”

While The WHS offers programs like SNAP (subsidized spay and neuter assistance program) and TNR (Trap Neuter Release) to combat Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis, the shelter still experiences an influx of cats every summer.

“Cats start their mating season when it’s warm outside, so hundreds of cats are reproducing – resulting in even more cats looking for homes,” said Dean. “These cats wind up at The Winnipeg Humane Society.”

Adoption fees will be waived, but the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All cats adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, six weeks of Pet Secure insurance and a two-week health check. The WHS is asking for donations of wet cat and kitten food. 

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Tue, 13 Aug 2013 08:34:09 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,309;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-waiving-cat-adoption-fees-as-hundreds-of-cats-look-for-homes http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,309;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-waiving-cat-adoption-fees-as-hundreds-of-cats-look-for-homes Posted in: News, Press-Release

(WINNIPEG)— Over 1,750 stray and abandoned cats have arrived at The Winnipeg Humane Society between May 1 and Aug. 11. Around 600 have come through the shelter doors in July alone. These numbers are expected to increase in the coming weeks and the shelter is presently at capacity. The WHS is having an event where adoption fees are waived in order to make space for the approximately 220 cats that arrive weekly.

On Friday, August 16 from 11 am to 7 pm, there will be no fees to adopt a cat over four months of age. Kittens under four months will be $25 to adopt. The normal adoption fee for kittens is $179.

“We’re seeing too many cats coming into the shelter, and we simply do not have the space to house them all,” said Judy Dean, Adoptions Manager at The WHS. “We’d much rather see these cats go to loving homes than face the alternative.”

While The WHS offers programs like SNAP (subsidized spay and neuter assistance program) and TNR (Trap Neuter Release) to combat Winnipeg’s cat overpopulation crisis, the shelter still experiences an influx of cats every summer.

“Cats start their mating season when it’s warm outside, so hundreds of cats are reproducing – resulting in even more cats looking for homes,” said Dean. “These cats wind up at The Winnipeg Humane Society.”

Adoption fees will be waived, but the same adoption process will be in effect. Potential adopters need to bring ID with current address and can expect the process to take over 40 minutes. All cats adopted from The WHS are spayed/neutered, have a tattoo ID, first vaccination, six weeks of Pet Secure insurance and a two-week health check. The WHS is asking for donations of wet cat and kitten food. 

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS takes in between 8,000-9,000 animals on an annual basis. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment.  For more information on The WHS, please visit winnipeghumanesociety.ca


]]>
Dog shot in the face is happy, healed, and looking for a new home Posted in: News, Press-Release, Animal-Feature

WINNIPEG - The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is happy to announce an update on Pardner, the dog who was shot in the face last winter. The one-year-old shepherd mix came to The WHS last January after the Swan Valley Animal Protection League found him with a gunshot wound to the head. He is now finally available for adoption.

Pardner will live with the bullet still lodged in his neck as it was too dangerous to remove, though it will not cause him harm. The WHS veterinary staff performed four surgeries on him to repair the damage to his skull and Pardner has since made a full recovery. His adopters will still need to feed him soft food for the next year as the bone continues to heal.

“It’s incredible that Pardner has gone through such trauma but is still such a friendly and good-natured dog,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, Director of Animal Health at The WHS. “He is an awesome dog and considering what he’s been through, he doesn’t hold a grudge.”

Pardner has spent the last four months recovering in vet care and foster homes and is finally ready to be adopted from the shelter.

“We were so thrilled to be able to help Pardner heal from his wounds,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “This sort of injury is sadly more common than we’d like it to be, and not all dogs are as lucky as Pardner is to survive.”

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS has pets for adoption to the public. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about cats or dogs for sale or The WHS please visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


]]>
Thu, 01 Aug 2013 08:50:54 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,308;Dog-shot-in-the-face-is-happy-healed-and-looking-for-a-new-home http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,308;Dog-shot-in-the-face-is-happy-healed-and-looking-for-a-new-home Posted in: News, Press-Release, Animal-Feature

WINNIPEG - The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is happy to announce an update on Pardner, the dog who was shot in the face last winter. The one-year-old shepherd mix came to The WHS last January after the Swan Valley Animal Protection League found him with a gunshot wound to the head. He is now finally available for adoption.

Pardner will live with the bullet still lodged in his neck as it was too dangerous to remove, though it will not cause him harm. The WHS veterinary staff performed four surgeries on him to repair the damage to his skull and Pardner has since made a full recovery. His adopters will still need to feed him soft food for the next year as the bone continues to heal.

“It’s incredible that Pardner has gone through such trauma but is still such a friendly and good-natured dog,” said Dr. Erika Anseeuw, Director of Animal Health at The WHS. “He is an awesome dog and considering what he’s been through, he doesn’t hold a grudge.”

Pardner has spent the last four months recovering in vet care and foster homes and is finally ready to be adopted from the shelter.

“We were so thrilled to be able to help Pardner heal from his wounds,” said Dr. Anseeuw. “This sort of injury is sadly more common than we’d like it to be, and not all dogs are as lucky as Pardner is to survive.”

###

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, The WHS has pets for adoption to the public. All pets offered for adoption and sale have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about cats or dogs for sale or The WHS please visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca.


]]>
Show your support for the cosmetic pesticide ban Posted in: News, Take-Action

Pets are smaller than us, and much closer to the ground. They often lie in the grass, chew it, and lick their paws and groom themselves. Pets can ingest these dangerous materials, and exposure can even occur in the house where pesticides are tracked in on people’s shoes or pets’ paws.

Pesticides are poisonous and designed to kill, and they may remain on the ground and in the air for long periods of time. Visit this link on our website for more details on the dangers of cosmetic pesticides.

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba supports legislation that:

  • Prohibits the use, sale and retail display of chemical pesticides for lawns, gardens and non-agricultural landscaping, including by licensed operators;
  • Is comprehensive in the number of pesticides included under the ban, including new chemicals as they are developed.
  • Provides for public education about the ban and alternatives to chemical pesticides;
  • Includes effective mechanisms for enforcement

Help ban the use of cosmetic pesticides in Manitoba.

Conservation and Water Stewardship Minister Gord Mackintosh has promised that Manitoba would introduce legislation this fall banning cosmetic pesticides for lawn use. However, the industry pressure is continuing. Show your support for the cosmetic pesticide ban by emailing Minister Mckintosh - Click here to send your pesticide-ban email now!

For more information on the cosmetic pesticide ban, please visit the GreenActionCentre.ca.

A message from Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba:

Action alert on cosmetic pesticides

The provincial government has announced they will introduce legislation banning cosmetic pesticides this fall, to come into effect at the end of 2014. The pesticide industry is sure to increase their pressure on the government to limit or delay a ban.

That's why the government needs to know that Manitobans support a ban. NOW is the time to contact your MLA with a simple phone call or email to express your support.

Phone numbers and emails for your MLA are available at:

http://www.gov.mb.ca/legislature/members/alphabetical.html

Not sure who your MLA is?

http://www.electionsmanitoba.ca/en/Voting/MLA

It's up to us as citizens to see that our health and environment are protected.


]]>
Wed, 24 Jul 2013 10:14:35 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,307;Show-your-support-for-the-cosmetic-pesticide-ban http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,307;Show-your-support-for-the-cosmetic-pesticide-ban Posted in: News, Take-Action

Pets are smaller than us, and much closer to the ground. They often lie in the grass, chew it, and lick their paws and groom themselves. Pets can ingest these dangerous materials, and exposure can even occur in the house where pesticides are tracked in on people’s shoes or pets’ paws.

Pesticides are poisonous and designed to kill, and they may remain on the ground and in the air for long periods of time. Visit this link on our website for more details on the dangers of cosmetic pesticides.

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba supports legislation that:

  • Prohibits the use, sale and retail display of chemical pesticides for lawns, gardens and non-agricultural landscaping, including by licensed operators;
  • Is comprehensive in the number of pesticides included under the ban, including new chemicals as they are developed.
  • Provides for public education about the ban and alternatives to chemical pesticides;
  • Includes effective mechanisms for enforcement

Help ban the use of cosmetic pesticides in Manitoba.

Conservation and Water Stewardship Minister Gord Mackintosh has promised that Manitoba would introduce legislation this fall banning cosmetic pesticides for lawn use. However, the industry pressure is continuing. Show your support for the cosmetic pesticide ban by emailing Minister Mckintosh - Click here to send your pesticide-ban email now!

For more information on the cosmetic pesticide ban, please visit the GreenActionCentre.ca.

A message from Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba:

Action alert on cosmetic pesticides

The provincial government has announced they will introduce legislation banning cosmetic pesticides this fall, to come into effect at the end of 2014. The pesticide industry is sure to increase their pressure on the government to limit or delay a ban.

That's why the government needs to know that Manitobans support a ban. NOW is the time to contact your MLA with a simple phone call or email to express your support.

Phone numbers and emails for your MLA are available at:

http://www.gov.mb.ca/legislature/members/alphabetical.html

Not sure who your MLA is?

http://www.electionsmanitoba.ca/en/Voting/MLA

It's up to us as citizens to see that our health and environment are protected.


]]>
Book a visit from The WHS Educators!

WHS Educators

Every year, WHS Educators visit hundreds of classrooms giving thousands of students the chance to learn about responsible pet ownership and pet safety. Our Educators visit schools in Winnipeg and surrounding areas to teach students of all ages about being responsive pet owners.

Our team includes qualified educators who are enthusiastic about teaching everyone the importance of having a responsible attitude towards animals. The WHS educational program is geared towards the provincial currciulum, and our team are all fully-trained educators with degrees in education.

New: Tours and educational programs are now offered in French.
Nous offrons maintenant des programmes et des visites guidées en français.

Classroom Visits

Our educators can come and visit your classroom with an interactive presentation that is geared specifically to your students' age group. The goal of this program is to encourage and enhance safety with pets and to nurture a responsible, empathetic attitude towards animals.

Each classroom visit includes a visit from one of our animals, giving students the chance to learn and interact with pets in a safe learning environment.

Book a classroom visit through our online form.

Program 4 Pets

Program 4 Pets is designed particularly for grade four students. It involves an hour-long session for four consecutive weeks. Each week, relevant resources are left with the class and the students are able to follow the progress of a specific WHS pet.

The program is offered to schools that have hosted WHS education programs for at least three years prior.

Please contact The Winnipeg Humane Society's education team at 204-982-2046 or by email for further information or to schedule presentations.


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Mon, 15 Jul 2013 09:03:02 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,306;Book-a-visit-from-The-WHS-Educators http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,306;Book-a-visit-from-The-WHS-Educators

WHS Educators

Every year, WHS Educators visit hundreds of classrooms giving thousands of students the chance to learn about responsible pet ownership and pet safety. Our Educators visit schools in Winnipeg and surrounding areas to teach students of all ages about being responsive pet owners.

Our team includes qualified educators who are enthusiastic about teaching everyone the importance of having a responsible attitude towards animals. The WHS educational program is geared towards the provincial currciulum, and our team are all fully-trained educators with degrees in education.

New: Tours and educational programs are now offered in French.
Nous offrons maintenant des programmes et des visites guidées en français.

Classroom Visits

Our educators can come and visit your classroom with an interactive presentation that is geared specifically to your students' age group. The goal of this program is to encourage and enhance safety with pets and to nurture a responsible, empathetic attitude towards animals.

Each classroom visit includes a visit from one of our animals, giving students the chance to learn and interact with pets in a safe learning environment.

Book a classroom visit through our online form.

Program 4 Pets

Program 4 Pets is designed particularly for grade four students. It involves an hour-long session for four consecutive weeks. Each week, relevant resources are left with the class and the students are able to follow the progress of a specific WHS pet.

The program is offered to schools that have hosted WHS education programs for at least three years prior.

Please contact The Winnipeg Humane Society's education team at 204-982-2046 or by email for further information or to schedule presentations.


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Does your pet have behaviour issues?

The Yelp line is here to guide you through any behaviour issues you may be experiencing with your pet!

Does your cat try to escape? Is your dog afraid of thunder? Check out the directory below for answers to all your questions! Can't find what you're looking for? Trained behaviour specialists are just a phone call away!

Call 204-988-8808 for more help.

Dog Issues

Cat Issues

General Issues


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Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:54:43 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,305;Does-your-pet-have-behaviour-issues http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,305;Does-your-pet-have-behaviour-issues

The Yelp line is here to guide you through any behaviour issues you may be experiencing with your pet!

Does your cat try to escape? Is your dog afraid of thunder? Check out the directory below for answers to all your questions! Can't find what you're looking for? Trained behaviour specialists are just a phone call away!

Call 204-988-8808 for more help.

Dog Issues

Cat Issues

General Issues


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Pet Loss Support

If you are dealing with the loss of a pet and need someone to talk to, The WHS can help.

  • Call and register for our Pet Loss Support Group.  (click for details)
  • Call our Pet Loss Support Line at 204-988-8804 if you would like to talk to someone about your loss. Messages are checked throughout the day, and every call will be returned.

Losing a Family Pet

We grieve over the death of a pet. This reaction is only natural. Our feelings toward pets are so special that experts have a term for the relationship: the human companion-animal bond. When this bond is severed, the sense of loss can be overwhelming.

Society does not offer a grieving pet owner a great deal of sympathy. Even a close friend may comment: "It's only a dog (cat) you can always get another." Such a reaction would be heartless given the loss of a human friend or family member. It is generally recognized that a person who has experienced such a loss, needs the support of friends and relatives. Psychologists now acknowledge that we need as much support but get far less with the loss of a companion animal.

How We Feel

When a person dies, there is usually a funeral or a memorial service where sorrow and tears are accepted, even expected. Afterwards, friends and relatives assist and comfort grieving family members until their grief subsides and new routes develop.

When a pet dies, there is no such social ritual to formalize the grief. To many people, a funeral for the family pet would seem eccentric and a formal period of mourning bizarre. even the immediate family and intimate friends may not fully appreciate the loss.

Still the loss of a pet affects our emotions, and even more so if the pet was an integral part of the family. These feelings usually progress though several stages. Recognizing them can help us cope with the grief we feel.

The First Stage: Denial

Denial is the initial response of many pet owners when confronted with a pet's terminal condition or sudden death. This rejection seems to be the minds 'buffer' against a sharp emotional blow.

The Second Stage: Bargaining

This stage is well documented in the human grieving process. Many times, faced with an impending death, and individual may "bargain" - offering some sacrifice if the loved one is spared. People losing a pet are loss likely to bargain. Still the hope that a pet may recover can foster reactors like, "If Rover recovers, I'll never skip his regular walk, never put him in a kennel when I go on vacation...never...". Bargaining following a death is often seen as all the "What if's" and "If only's" that people often torment themselves with.

The Third Stage: Anger

Recognizing anger in the grief process is seldom a problem; dealing with it often is. Anger can be obvious, as in hostility or aggression. On the other hand, anger often times turns inward, emerging as guilt.

Many veterinarians heard the classic anger response, "What happened? I thought you had everything under control and now you've killed my dog!" Or: "You never really cared about Rover. He was just another fee to you, and I'm the one that lost my pet!" Such outbursts help relieve immediate frustrations, but often at the expense of someone else. More commonly, pet owners dwell on the past. "If only I hadn't left the dog at my sister's house...", "If only I had taken kitty to the veterinarian a week ago..." Whether true or false, this usually does little to relieve anger and is not constructive.

Anger can be directed at anyone. The veterinarian as in your example, at a stranger who may have been involved in the death as when a dog is hit by a car, at a family member who did not have a very close relationship with the pet and is seen as not grieving, at God for allowing the death to occur and not saving the pet, or it can be a free-floating rage that this has occurred and the bereaved owner was powerless to prevent it. Of course, there is also the anger turned inward that is experienced as guilt - perhaps the most difficult form of anger to cope with.

The Fourth Stage: Grief

This stage of true sadness. The pet is gone, along with the guilt and anger, and only emptiness remains. It is now that the support of family and friends is most important - and sadly most difficult to find.

A lack of support prolongs the grief stage. Therefore, the pet owner may want to seek some help from a professional counsellor. It is normal, and should be acceptable, to display grief when a companion animal dies. It is helpful too, to recognize that other pet owners have experienced similar strong feelings, and you are not alone in this feeling of grief.

When grieving the loss of someone whom we have loved, species is irrelevant. What is important is the loss of a meaningful relationship. No one grieves for a dog, or a cat, or a horse, or a rabbit - they grieve for a particular individual with whom they had a relationship and shared a love bond.

People experiencing grief do not progress through the stages of grief in a linear manner. Instead we often bounce back and forth among the various stages often the same day, or within the space of a few hours.

The Proper Good-Bye

At some point, you are going to have to make final arrangements for your pet. Most veterinarians can either handle matters themselves or explain the choices available. There are several options:

Cemetery Burial: People have been burying their pets in ritual fashion since Egyptian time. Today there are pet cemeteries in virtually every populated area.

Home Burial: It is not uncommon for pet owners to bury their pets somewhere on their own property, but you should check with your municipality before making such arrangements. Typically, home burial is permitted in rural and suburban settings. A tight-fitting wooden box would be appropriate for your pet's remains.

Cremations: Your veterinarian probably can arrange for cremation and advise you on environmental concerns regarding the disposal of ashes.

In Memorial

It is helpful to find a personally meaningful way to memorialize the loss of a pet. It's a way to openly acknowledge the life of the pet, and the importance of the pet in the life of the owner. Some people create photo albums of the pet, others may plant a tree or shrub in memory of the pet, while others make a "memory box" in which all the pets belongings are kept. For many people it is comforting to commemorate the pet's life by doing something that will help other animals; they may choose to make a donation in memory of their pet that will help other animal welfare organizations such as The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The Final Stage: Resolution

As grief progresses, the painful memories of the death of the pet recede in memory, and the memories of happier times take a more prominent position. Immediately following the death of a pet most people are overwhelmed by the painful feelings of loss, but in this time that people begin to think about the possibility of a new companion animal. The new pet will never replace the deceased pet, but it would be a new relationship with a different individual who will likely turn out to have all sorts of endearing mannerisms and traits of their own.

Please visit Pet Loss Support on Facebook: facebook.com/petloss.


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Thu, 11 Jul 2013 10:04:18 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,304;Pet-Loss-Support http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,304;Pet-Loss-Support

If you are dealing with the loss of a pet and need someone to talk to, The WHS can help.

  • Call and register for our Pet Loss Support Group.  (click for details)
  • Call our Pet Loss Support Line at 204-988-8804 if you would like to talk to someone about your loss. Messages are checked throughout the day, and every call will be returned.

Losing a Family Pet

We grieve over the death of a pet. This reaction is only natural. Our feelings toward pets are so special that experts have a term for the relationship: the human companion-animal bond. When this bond is severed, the sense of loss can be overwhelming.

Society does not offer a grieving pet owner a great deal of sympathy. Even a close friend may comment: "It's only a dog (cat) you can always get another." Such a reaction would be heartless given the loss of a human friend or family member. It is generally recognized that a person who has experienced such a loss, needs the support of friends and relatives. Psychologists now acknowledge that we need as much support but get far less with the loss of a companion animal.

How We Feel

When a person dies, there is usually a funeral or a memorial service where sorrow and tears are accepted, even expected. Afterwards, friends and relatives assist and comfort grieving family members until their grief subsides and new routes develop.

When a pet dies, there is no such social ritual to formalize the grief. To many people, a funeral for the family pet would seem eccentric and a formal period of mourning bizarre. even the immediate family and intimate friends may not fully appreciate the loss.

Still the loss of a pet affects our emotions, and even more so if the pet was an integral part of the family. These feelings usually progress though several stages. Recognizing them can help us cope with the grief we feel.

The First Stage: Denial

Denial is the initial response of many pet owners when confronted with a pet's terminal condition or sudden death. This rejection seems to be the minds 'buffer' against a sharp emotional blow.

The Second Stage: Bargaining

This stage is well documented in the human grieving process. Many times, faced with an impending death, and individual may "bargain" - offering some sacrifice if the loved one is spared. People losing a pet are loss likely to bargain. Still the hope that a pet may recover can foster reactors like, "If Rover recovers, I'll never skip his regular walk, never put him in a kennel when I go on vacation...never...". Bargaining following a death is often seen as all the "What if's" and "If only's" that people often torment themselves with.

The Third Stage: Anger

Recognizing anger in the grief process is seldom a problem; dealing with it often is. Anger can be obvious, as in hostility or aggression. On the other hand, anger often times turns inward, emerging as guilt.

Many veterinarians heard the classic anger response, "What happened? I thought you had everything under control and now you've killed my dog!" Or: "You never really cared about Rover. He was just another fee to you, and I'm the one that lost my pet!" Such outbursts help relieve immediate frustrations, but often at the expense of someone else. More commonly, pet owners dwell on the past. "If only I hadn't left the dog at my sister's house...", "If only I had taken kitty to the veterinarian a week ago..." Whether true or false, this usually does little to relieve anger and is not constructive.

Anger can be directed at anyone. The veterinarian as in your example, at a stranger who may have been involved in the death as when a dog is hit by a car, at a family member who did not have a very close relationship with the pet and is seen as not grieving, at God for allowing the death to occur and not saving the pet, or it can be a free-floating rage that this has occurred and the bereaved owner was powerless to prevent it. Of course, there is also the anger turned inward that is experienced as guilt - perhaps the most difficult form of anger to cope with.

The Fourth Stage: Grief

This stage of true sadness. The pet is gone, along with the guilt and anger, and only emptiness remains. It is now that the support of family and friends is most important - and sadly most difficult to find.

A lack of support prolongs the grief stage. Therefore, the pet owner may want to seek some help from a professional counsellor. It is normal, and should be acceptable, to display grief when a companion animal dies. It is helpful too, to recognize that other pet owners have experienced similar strong feelings, and you are not alone in this feeling of grief.

When grieving the loss of someone whom we have loved, species is irrelevant. What is important is the loss of a meaningful relationship. No one grieves for a dog, or a cat, or a horse, or a rabbit - they grieve for a particular individual with whom they had a relationship and shared a love bond.

People experiencing grief do not progress through the stages of grief in a linear manner. Instead we often bounce back and forth among the various stages often the same day, or within the space of a few hours.

The Proper Good-Bye

At some point, you are going to have to make final arrangements for your pet. Most veterinarians can either handle matters themselves or explain the choices available. There are several options:

Cemetery Burial: People have been burying their pets in ritual fashion since Egyptian time. Today there are pet cemeteries in virtually every populated area.

Home Burial: It is not uncommon for pet owners to bury their pets somewhere on their own property, but you should check with your municipality before making such arrangements. Typically, home burial is permitted in rural and suburban settings. A tight-fitting wooden box would be appropriate for your pet's remains.

Cremations: Your veterinarian probably can arrange for cremation and advise you on environmental concerns regarding the disposal of ashes.

In Memorial

It is helpful to find a personally meaningful way to memorialize the loss of a pet. It's a way to openly acknowledge the life of the pet, and the importance of the pet in the life of the owner. Some people create photo albums of the pet, others may plant a tree or shrub in memory of the pet, while others make a "memory box" in which all the pets belongings are kept. For many people it is comforting to commemorate the pet's life by doing something that will help other animals; they may choose to make a donation in memory of their pet that will help other animal welfare organizations such as The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The Final Stage: Resolution

As grief progresses, the painful memories of the death of the pet recede in memory, and the memories of happier times take a more prominent position. Immediately following the death of a pet most people are overwhelmed by the painful feelings of loss, but in this time that people begin to think about the possibility of a new companion animal. The new pet will never replace the deceased pet, but it would be a new relationship with a different individual who will likely turn out to have all sorts of endearing mannerisms and traits of their own.

Please visit Pet Loss Support on Facebook: facebook.com/petloss.


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WHS seeks your support for Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law Posted in: News, Take-Action

The City of Winnipeg is amending its current animal by-law and bringing forth a new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law. On Thursday, July 4, WHS CEO Bill McDonald will represent The WHS at a standing committee at City Hall in support of this proposed By-Law.

These new amendments are important to Winnipeg for a number of animal issues. The most important is the provision on cat licensing. For the very first time, cats will have to be licensed in the City of Winnipeg. The net proceeds from the license fees collected will be provided to The WHS to expand our spay/neuter program.

The other significant provision in the By-Law concerns exotic animals. Once this By-Law passes City Council a section states, “the Chief Operating Officer does not have the authority to issue a special permit to authorize a travelling zoo, travelling exhibit or a circus from keeping or harbouring a prohibited animal while in Winnipeg.” This means no more circuses can come to town with any exotic animal, period!

Please contact the following City politicians and let them know you support the Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law, as they are the committee members that will first pass this important legislation. They are:

The message to them is simple: please pass this new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law!

Thank you for your support of The Winnipeg Humane Society.


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Wed, 03 Jul 2013 11:20:35 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,303;WHS-seeks-your-support-for-Responsible-Pet-Ownership-By-Law http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,303;WHS-seeks-your-support-for-Responsible-Pet-Ownership-By-Law Posted in: News, Take-Action

The City of Winnipeg is amending its current animal by-law and bringing forth a new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law. On Thursday, July 4, WHS CEO Bill McDonald will represent The WHS at a standing committee at City Hall in support of this proposed By-Law.

These new amendments are important to Winnipeg for a number of animal issues. The most important is the provision on cat licensing. For the very first time, cats will have to be licensed in the City of Winnipeg. The net proceeds from the license fees collected will be provided to The WHS to expand our spay/neuter program.

The other significant provision in the By-Law concerns exotic animals. Once this By-Law passes City Council a section states, “the Chief Operating Officer does not have the authority to issue a special permit to authorize a travelling zoo, travelling exhibit or a circus from keeping or harbouring a prohibited animal while in Winnipeg.” This means no more circuses can come to town with any exotic animal, period!

Please contact the following City politicians and let them know you support the Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law, as they are the committee members that will first pass this important legislation. They are:

The message to them is simple: please pass this new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law!

Thank you for your support of The Winnipeg Humane Society.


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Follow us on Instagram!

The Winnipeg Humane Society is now on Instagram - follow us @WHSanimals for adorable animal pictures!


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Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:44:59 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,298;Follow-us-on-Instagram http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,298;Follow-us-on-Instagram

The Winnipeg Humane Society is now on Instagram - follow us @WHSanimals for adorable animal pictures!


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The Challenges of Giving Shelter

Winnipeg Filmmaker Kevin Nikkel of Five Door Films and the Winnipeg Arts Council's WITH ART program present The Challenges of Giving Shelter, a documentary about The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The Challenges of Giving Shelter gives a behind the scenes look at the daily workings of the Winnipeg Humane Society shelter. This is a world of dedicated animal lovers faced with difficult decisions, where sympathetic staff and volunteers manage their compassion fatigue and community expectations to care for cute, cuddly, at times dangerous and homeless animals.

The film gives a better understanding of the people who work on the front lines of this unique facility to offer medical treatment, foster care and adoption services for animals. The daily intake of animals is performed with a ritual of humane care, but the constant dilemma of overpopulation raises the issue of euthanizing animals. The film explores the personal aspects of work, societal responsibility and the challenges of providing humane treatment to animals.

Below are three deleted scenes from The Challenges of Giving Shelter.


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Mon, 17 Jun 2013 13:50:43 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,297;The-Challenges-of-Giving-Shelter http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,297;The-Challenges-of-Giving-Shelter

Winnipeg Filmmaker Kevin Nikkel of Five Door Films and the Winnipeg Arts Council's WITH ART program present The Challenges of Giving Shelter, a documentary about The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The Challenges of Giving Shelter gives a behind the scenes look at the daily workings of the Winnipeg Humane Society shelter. This is a world of dedicated animal lovers faced with difficult decisions, where sympathetic staff and volunteers manage their compassion fatigue and community expectations to care for cute, cuddly, at times dangerous and homeless animals.

The film gives a better understanding of the people who work on the front lines of this unique facility to offer medical treatment, foster care and adoption services for animals. The daily intake of animals is performed with a ritual of humane care, but the constant dilemma of overpopulation raises the issue of euthanizing animals. The film explores the personal aspects of work, societal responsibility and the challenges of providing humane treatment to animals.

Below are three deleted scenes from The Challenges of Giving Shelter.


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Become a Pet Foster Parent! Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

The WHS foster care program operates in an attempt to give each animal a fair opportunity to be placed into our adoption program.

You provide a shelter animal with a temporary home – we provide all supplies needed until the animal can be returned to the shelter for adoption.  Fostering is a fulfilling and rewarding volunteer job that you can do in your own home.

Things you should know about before fostering:

  • Common illnesses in cats and dogs and how you can handle them as a foster parent.
  • Behaviour issues with dogs and cats and how you can understand and help your foster animals.
  • Important tips on how to socialize kittens and puppies.
  • Opportunities to participate in beginner and advanced dog training classes.

Animals that are most likely to go into foster are:

  • moms and babies (cats and dogs)
  • orphaned kittens or puppies
  • cats and dogs with minor injuries
  • dogs that don't 'show' well in a shelter atmosphere and need to be adopted through foster (paperwork is still completed through the Adoptions Department)
  • cats and dogs that just need a break from the shelter

The Foster Care Program provides everything that is needed for the care of the animals while in a foster home. The only thing that a potential Foster Parent needs is a separate room (spare room, laundry room, bathroom, etc) to quarantine from other animals in the home, and lots of love and attention. The work is hard, but the payoff to see your foster animal go into their home is worth it!

Note: If you live outside of Winnipeg, you can still foster for us!  You just need to be able to transport your foster pets into the city for check-ups and supplies.

We are currently looking for foster parents to become a part of our program for cats & kittens (with and without 'moms').

Click here to download a Foster Application form (PDF 12KB).

Click here to download our information brochure on becoming a foster parent (PDF 202KB).

Interested in fostering and want more details?

Please call 204-982-2049 or email us for more information


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Thu, 13 Jun 2013 16:09:09 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,295;Become-a-Pet-Foster-Parent http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,295;Become-a-Pet-Foster-Parent Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

The WHS foster care program operates in an attempt to give each animal a fair opportunity to be placed into our adoption program.

You provide a shelter animal with a temporary home – we provide all supplies needed until the animal can be returned to the shelter for adoption.  Fostering is a fulfilling and rewarding volunteer job that you can do in your own home.

Things you should know about before fostering:

  • Common illnesses in cats and dogs and how you can handle them as a foster parent.
  • Behaviour issues with dogs and cats and how you can understand and help your foster animals.
  • Important tips on how to socialize kittens and puppies.
  • Opportunities to participate in beginner and advanced dog training classes.

Animals that are most likely to go into foster are:

  • moms and babies (cats and dogs)
  • orphaned kittens or puppies
  • cats and dogs with minor injuries
  • dogs that don't 'show' well in a shelter atmosphere and need to be adopted through foster (paperwork is still completed through the Adoptions Department)
  • cats and dogs that just need a break from the shelter

The Foster Care Program provides everything that is needed for the care of the animals while in a foster home. The only thing that a potential Foster Parent needs is a separate room (spare room, laundry room, bathroom, etc) to quarantine from other animals in the home, and lots of love and attention. The work is hard, but the payoff to see your foster animal go into their home is worth it!

Note: If you live outside of Winnipeg, you can still foster for us!  You just need to be able to transport your foster pets into the city for check-ups and supplies.

We are currently looking for foster parents to become a part of our program for cats & kittens (with and without 'moms').

Click here to download a Foster Application form (PDF 12KB).

Click here to download our information brochure on becoming a foster parent (PDF 202KB).

Interested in fostering and want more details?

Please call 204-982-2049 or email us for more information


]]>
Protect your pet from diseases and parasites Posted in: News, Animal-Feature

Diseases and Parasites

Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?
Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is carried and spread by the deer tick (pictured here). The bacterium is found in mice, deer, and  other wildlife. When a tick feeds on an infected animal, the tick  transfers the bacteria to the next animal it feeds on. This disease can affect your pets, as well as you; however, you can only catch the disease if you’re bitten by the tick itself, NOT by contact with your pet.

Lyme disease is found in Canada, and the highest incidences occur in North West Ontario along the Manitoban border, however, it can also be found in British Columbia, Quebec, and New Brunswick.

Deer TickHow do I know if my dog has Lyme disease?
The most common symptom of Lyme disease infection in dogs is arthritis, which causes inflammation, pain in joints and lameness. Other signs can also be dehydration, loss of appetite and weight, inactivity and swollen lymph nodes. Signs of the disease usually develop 2-5 months after the infection, with the period of lameness lasting for 3-4 days.

Most dogs exposed to the Lyme bacterium, do not get ill. Also, some dogs require treatment, however, many infections resolve on their own.
    
Diagnosis is made by a blood test that detects exposure to the bacterium in conjunction with symptoms. The test will also identify a dog that was exposed to the bacterium but did not become ill; therefore, interpretation of a positive result is important.

How can I protect my dog?

  • Prevention - Early removal of ticks by carefully inspecting your dog’s ears, tail area, elbows and between toes. This should be done daily, as it takes the tick about 48 hours to infect your dog.
  • Tick control - Use tick repellant sprays weekly, and apply them before going into tick infested areas.
  • Vaccination – This is also available, but has a high rate of side effects.

The University of Manitoba has produced a video on how to properly remove ticks. Check it out here:

Heartworms

What are Heartworms?
Heartworms are blood parasites that pose a dangerous and even fatal condition to your dog. Immature heartworms are spread by mosquitoes and are passed along into the bloodstream of the dog. They travel to the right side of the heart where they can grow and reproduce, resulting in blockage of the arteries. Adult heartworms can grow to the length of 15-30cm, and in severe cases, a dog can be infested with hundreds of them.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of heartworm disease depend on how many worms the dog carries, and how long they have been carried. Unfortunately, most symptoms are detectable only after much damage has been done to the internal organs, which can be irreversible.
   
Signs include intolerance to exercise, chronic cough, listlessness, labored breathing, weight loss, fainting, chest bulging, and abnormal heart and lung sounds. Worms in the heart decrease the amount of oxygen rich blood, and increase the work load, causing liver and kidney problems, and heart failure.

What are the treatment options for this disease?
Preventing heartworm disease is easy! There are monthly medications that are available at your local vet. The heart worm prevention program in Manitoba starts on June 1st- Nov 1st. Every dog should be on heartworm prevention. 

How can I protect my dog?
Since Southern Manitoba is one of the areas in Canada that is endemic, and the disease is transmissible in warmer seasons, protecting your dog from heartworms is important. Once-a-month tablets are available to prevent the growth of heartworms into adult ones, as well as solutions that can be applied directly to the skin in mosquito season.

Blastomycosis

What is Blastomycosis?
Blastomycosis is a fungal infection caused by a fungus, which grows as a mould in moist, warm, acid and sandy soils. Dogs often get the infection after inhaling in the spores from the soil and into their lungs, but can also occur through contact with exposed skin (e.g. wounds).
   
This fungus is found in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, as well as Quebec, and can be fatal if untreated. Once the fungus is in the body, it multiplies rapidly and can spread from the lungs where it creates a pulmonary lung infection, to other parts of the body such as eyes, bones, brain and urogenital system

What are the symptoms of Blastomycosis?
Signs can include:

  • Respiratory tract problems such as difficulty in breathing and harsh lung sounds
  • Coughing
  • Exercise intolerance 
  • Anorexia and weight loss
  • Depression and lameness
  • Fever that does not respond to antibiotics ( 103 degrees or higher)
  • Eye problems such as redness, pain, swelling, excessive tearing, clouding of the cornea, and in extreme cases, blindness.
  • Blood in urine
  • Draining skin lesions and forming ulcers on skin
  • Enlarged lymph nodes

To diagnose Blastomycosis, a sample is taken from the infected tissue. A chest x-ray can also be taken for respiratory disease.

What are the treatment options for Blastomycosis?
It can take weeks or even months for any signs of Blastomycosis to appear, but sometimes, the dog’s immune system can fight off the infection if relatively small amounts were inhaled. However, if the dog is not able to fight of the fungal infection, oral antifungal drugs are available.
    
How Can I protect my dog?
Unfortunately, there is no other way to protect your pet other than to avoid the areas with high Blastomycosis population. If you are out for the weekend in your cottage, ensure that your dog is not digging beneath the cottage or in wet, damp, moldy areas such as beneath rocks that are close to the water. Be aware of the symptoms, and take immediate actions if you think that your dog may have Blastomycosis. 

Tapeworms

What are tapeworms?
Tapeworms are an intestinal parasite that can affect dogs (and cats). They attach themselves to the wall of the small intestine with their hook-like mouth. They are flat and segmented, white in color and can grow to the length of several feet. As the tapeworm matures, those small segments break off the tail part of the worm and pass into the stool, while new segments are formed at the neck area. These segments are about the size of a grain of rice and are mobile when first passed. There are several types of tapeworms that infect pets.

How would my dog or cat get infected with tapeworms?
Tapeworms are spread by eating infected, fleas, rodents, or fish. Your pet can ONLY get tapeworms this way, not from another pet.

  • By swallowing a flea that has tapeworm larvae (from other animal’s feces) while grooming
  • When they eat a rabbit, rodent, or such that is infested with the tapeworms

What are the signs and symptoms of the infection?
Often, you may be able to see dried segments of the tapeworm around the pet’s anus (they resemble rice grains), or even moving segments in their feces.
   
Usually, infections are not very harmful to your dog, but heavy infections can be. The tapeworms feed off the nutrients of the dog, and therefore can cause malnutrition and a dull looking coat. Other symptoms may include inflammation of the intestine, diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.
    
The infection is usually diagnosed when the white moving parts are seen crawling on the dog, or in their feces, however, they are often not detected in the routine fecal examination.

How can I protect my dog?

  • Prevention by regular de-worming with medication able to get tapeworms. 
  • Flea control and elimination
  • Do not allow hunting of wild animals and rodents or eating raw fish.
  • Treatment is simple and effective. Drugs are available at your vet clinic and can kill the tapeworms.

Roundworms

What are roundworms?
Roundworms are the most common intestinal parasites found especially in young puppies and kittens. Adult roundworms are slender, spaghetti-like bodies, white-ish-to-cream colored and can grow up to several inches. They move against and feed on the food ingested by the dog.

How would my dog get infected?

  • During embryonic development, larvae can be passed to the puppy or kitten (most puppies are infected that way)
  • Milk from an infected mother
  • Swallowing worm eggs from the soil in the environment (from self grooming or soil) 
  • From eating an infested animal such as a rodent or a rabbit

What are the signs and symptoms of an infection?

  • A pot-bellied appearance to the abdomen especially in puppies
  • Coughing and Vomiting
  • Dull hair coat and weight loss
  • The presence of worms in the stool or vomit of the dog
  • In serious cases, anemia and pneumonia due to the worm’s presence in the respiratory system

Note that the younger the puppy, the more symptoms it will show. Older dogs may not show any outward symptoms at all.

Are the roundworms transmittable to humans?
Yes they are, however, humans are not the usual hosts for these parasites and the worms can get “lost” in the human body. If larvae enter the eyes, blindness can result. Young children are most vulnerable to roundworm infections because of their habits to put things in their mouth. If a human ingests roundworm eggs, they will become infected. Deworming your pet will help keep people safe.

How can I protect my dog and my family?

  • All puppies need to be given a monthly dewormer against all the major intestinal parasites by the age of two weeks
  • Routine fecal testing
  • Immediate feces pickup to eliminate any possible larvae


]]>
Thu, 13 Jun 2013 15:54:54 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,294;Protect-your-pet-from-diseases-and-parasites http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,294;Protect-your-pet-from-diseases-and-parasites Posted in: News, Animal-Feature

Diseases and Parasites

Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?
Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is carried and spread by the deer tick (pictured here). The bacterium is found in mice, deer, and  other wildlife. When a tick feeds on an infected animal, the tick  transfers the bacteria to the next animal it feeds on. This disease can affect your pets, as well as you; however, you can only catch the disease if you’re bitten by the tick itself, NOT by contact with your pet.

Lyme disease is found in Canada, and the highest incidences occur in North West Ontario along the Manitoban border, however, it can also be found in British Columbia, Quebec, and New Brunswick.

Deer TickHow do I know if my dog has Lyme disease?
The most common symptom of Lyme disease infection in dogs is arthritis, which causes inflammation, pain in joints and lameness. Other signs can also be dehydration, loss of appetite and weight, inactivity and swollen lymph nodes. Signs of the disease usually develop 2-5 months after the infection, with the period of lameness lasting for 3-4 days.

Most dogs exposed to the Lyme bacterium, do not get ill. Also, some dogs require treatment, however, many infections resolve on their own.
    
Diagnosis is made by a blood test that detects exposure to the bacterium in conjunction with symptoms. The test will also identify a dog that was exposed to the bacterium but did not become ill; therefore, interpretation of a positive result is important.

How can I protect my dog?

  • Prevention - Early removal of ticks by carefully inspecting your dog’s ears, tail area, elbows and between toes. This should be done daily, as it takes the tick about 48 hours to infect your dog.
  • Tick control - Use tick repellant sprays weekly, and apply them before going into tick infested areas.
  • Vaccination – This is also available, but has a high rate of side effects.

The University of Manitoba has produced a video on how to properly remove ticks. Check it out here:

Heartworms

What are Heartworms?
Heartworms are blood parasites that pose a dangerous and even fatal condition to your dog. Immature heartworms are spread by mosquitoes and are passed along into the bloodstream of the dog. They travel to the right side of the heart where they can grow and reproduce, resulting in blockage of the arteries. Adult heartworms can grow to the length of 15-30cm, and in severe cases, a dog can be infested with hundreds of them.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of heartworm disease depend on how many worms the dog carries, and how long they have been carried. Unfortunately, most symptoms are detectable only after much damage has been done to the internal organs, which can be irreversible.
   
Signs include intolerance to exercise, chronic cough, listlessness, labored breathing, weight loss, fainting, chest bulging, and abnormal heart and lung sounds. Worms in the heart decrease the amount of oxygen rich blood, and increase the work load, causing liver and kidney problems, and heart failure.

What are the treatment options for this disease?
Preventing heartworm disease is easy! There are monthly medications that are available at your local vet. The heart worm prevention program in Manitoba starts on June 1st- Nov 1st. Every dog should be on heartworm prevention. 

How can I protect my dog?
Since Southern Manitoba is one of the areas in Canada that is endemic, and the disease is transmissible in warmer seasons, protecting your dog from heartworms is important. Once-a-month tablets are available to prevent the growth of heartworms into adult ones, as well as solutions that can be applied directly to the skin in mosquito season.

Blastomycosis

What is Blastomycosis?
Blastomycosis is a fungal infection caused by a fungus, which grows as a mould in moist, warm, acid and sandy soils. Dogs often get the infection after inhaling in the spores from the soil and into their lungs, but can also occur through contact with exposed skin (e.g. wounds).
   
This fungus is found in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, as well as Quebec, and can be fatal if untreated. Once the fungus is in the body, it multiplies rapidly and can spread from the lungs where it creates a pulmonary lung infection, to other parts of the body such as eyes, bones, brain and urogenital system

What are the symptoms of Blastomycosis?
Signs can include:

  • Respiratory tract problems such as difficulty in breathing and harsh lung sounds
  • Coughing
  • Exercise intolerance 
  • Anorexia and weight loss
  • Depression and lameness
  • Fever that does not respond to antibiotics ( 103 degrees or higher)
  • Eye problems such as redness, pain, swelling, excessive tearing, clouding of the cornea, and in extreme cases, blindness.
  • Blood in urine
  • Draining skin lesions and forming ulcers on skin
  • Enlarged lymph nodes

To diagnose Blastomycosis, a sample is taken from the infected tissue. A chest x-ray can also be taken for respiratory disease.

What are the treatment options for Blastomycosis?
It can take weeks or even months for any signs of Blastomycosis to appear, but sometimes, the dog’s immune system can fight off the infection if relatively small amounts were inhaled. However, if the dog is not able to fight of the fungal infection, oral antifungal drugs are available.
    
How Can I protect my dog?
Unfortunately, there is no other way to protect your pet other than to avoid the areas with high Blastomycosis population. If you are out for the weekend in your cottage, ensure that your dog is not digging beneath the cottage or in wet, damp, moldy areas such as beneath rocks that are close to the water. Be aware of the symptoms, and take immediate actions if you think that your dog may have Blastomycosis. 

Tapeworms

What are tapeworms?
Tapeworms are an intestinal parasite that can affect dogs (and cats). They attach themselves to the wall of the small intestine with their hook-like mouth. They are flat and segmented, white in color and can grow to the length of several feet. As the tapeworm matures, those small segments break off the tail part of the worm and pass into the stool, while new segments are formed at the neck area. These segments are about the size of a grain of rice and are mobile when first passed. There are several types of tapeworms that infect pets.

How would my dog or cat get infected with tapeworms?
Tapeworms are spread by eating infected, fleas, rodents, or fish. Your pet can ONLY get tapeworms this way, not from another pet.

  • By swallowing a flea that has tapeworm larvae (from other animal’s feces) while grooming
  • When they eat a rabbit, rodent, or such that is infested with the tapeworms

What are the signs and symptoms of the infection?
Often, you may be able to see dried segments of the tapeworm around the pet’s anus (they resemble rice grains), or even moving segments in their feces.
   
Usually, infections are not very harmful to your dog, but heavy infections can be. The tapeworms feed off the nutrients of the dog, and therefore can cause malnutrition and a dull looking coat. Other symptoms may include inflammation of the intestine, diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.
    
The infection is usually diagnosed when the white moving parts are seen crawling on the dog, or in their feces, however, they are often not detected in the routine fecal examination.

How can I protect my dog?

  • Prevention by regular de-worming with medication able to get tapeworms. 
  • Flea control and elimination
  • Do not allow hunting of wild animals and rodents or eating raw fish.
  • Treatment is simple and effective. Drugs are available at your vet clinic and can kill the tapeworms.

Roundworms

What are roundworms?
Roundworms are the most common intestinal parasites found especially in young puppies and kittens. Adult roundworms are slender, spaghetti-like bodies, white-ish-to-cream colored and can grow up to several inches. They move against and feed on the food ingested by the dog.

How would my dog get infected?

  • During embryonic development, larvae can be passed to the puppy or kitten (most puppies are infected that way)
  • Milk from an infected mother
  • Swallowing worm eggs from the soil in the environment (from self grooming or soil) 
  • From eating an infested animal such as a rodent or a rabbit

What are the signs and symptoms of an infection?

  • A pot-bellied appearance to the abdomen especially in puppies
  • Coughing and Vomiting
  • Dull hair coat and weight loss
  • The presence of worms in the stool or vomit of the dog
  • In serious cases, anemia and pneumonia due to the worm’s presence in the respiratory system

Note that the younger the puppy, the more symptoms it will show. Older dogs may not show any outward symptoms at all.

Are the roundworms transmittable to humans?
Yes they are, however, humans are not the usual hosts for these parasites and the worms can get “lost” in the human body. If larvae enter the eyes, blindness can result. Young children are most vulnerable to roundworm infections because of their habits to put things in their mouth. If a human ingests roundworm eggs, they will become infected. Deworming your pet will help keep people safe.

How can I protect my dog and my family?

  • All puppies need to be given a monthly dewormer against all the major intestinal parasites by the age of two weeks
  • Routine fecal testing
  • Immediate feces pickup to eliminate any possible larvae


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SNAP to it! Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

Spay and Neuter Assistance (SNAP)

The Winnipeg Humane Society is committed to reducing the number of homeless pets in our community. Providing an affordable spay and neuter option to all Manitobans is part of our plan.

Low income families can apply for the SNAP program to get their cat spayed or neutered for around $30 within the City of Winnipeg . (Please call for the applicable fee schedule outside city limits.)

There are many ways to qualify, so call 204-888-SNAP to see if you do!  You will be required to provide proof of household income (most current income tax information for all occupants) or proof of social assistance in order to participate in SNAP.  We recommend that your pet be spayed/neutered anytime after the age of four months and ideally before the first heat.  We are currently booking within the week appointments.

Subsidized spay and neuter surgeries are also available for dogs and rabbits, and for pets living outside of Winnipeg.  Participants in this program may qualify according to their household income.

All pets participating in this program are required to have their full vaccinations with records provided to the clinic staff.  If needed, a subsidy vaccination will be administered at the time of the surgery.


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Tue, 04 Jun 2013 14:18:52 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,289;SNAP-to-it http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,289;SNAP-to-it Posted in: News, Animal-Feature, Take-Action

Spay and Neuter Assistance (SNAP)

The Winnipeg Humane Society is committed to reducing the number of homeless pets in our community. Providing an affordable spay and neuter option to all Manitobans is part of our plan.

Low income families can apply for the SNAP program to get their cat spayed or neutered for around $30 within the City of Winnipeg . (Please call for the applicable fee schedule outside city limits.)

There are many ways to qualify, so call 204-888-SNAP to see if you do!  You will be required to provide proof of household income (most current income tax information for all occupants) or proof of social assistance in order to participate in SNAP.  We recommend that your pet be spayed/neutered anytime after the age of four months and ideally before the first heat.  We are currently booking within the week appointments.

Subsidized spay and neuter surgeries are also available for dogs and rabbits, and for pets living outside of Winnipeg.  Participants in this program may qualify according to their household income.

All pets participating in this program are required to have their full vaccinations with records provided to the clinic staff.  If needed, a subsidy vaccination will be administered at the time of the surgery.


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The Spring Newsletter is here!

Our Spring Newsletter is now online! This issue features:

  • Circus Secrets: the Painful Truth Behind Animals in Entertainment
  • Dogs at Work
  • Barn Buddy Happy Tails
  • Paws in Motion
  • And more!


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Tue, 04 Jun 2013 14:05:54 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,288;The-Spring-Newsletter-is-here http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,288;The-Spring-Newsletter-is-here

Our Spring Newsletter is now online! This issue features:

  • Circus Secrets: the Painful Truth Behind Animals in Entertainment
  • Dogs at Work
  • Barn Buddy Happy Tails
  • Paws in Motion
  • And more!


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The Challenges of Giving Shelter Posted in: News, Press-Release

PLEASE NOTE: The 7 pm screening is now FULL. A second screening at 8:45 pm has been added. Please RSVP by e-mailing communications@winnipeghumanesociety.ca or calling 204 982 3555

A new documentary about the Winnipeg Humane Society will premiere May 14th, 7 p.m.  The film was made possible through the Winnipeg Arts Council’s Community WITH ART Program.  It was a collaborative process whereby the filmmaker was given access to The WHS to discover the focus and theme of this film.

The Winnipeg Arts Council’s Community WITH ART Program partners professional artists with community groups to work on community identity, issues, and shared goals through the development of an art project. By engaging in the artistic process and interacting with professional artists, people are given a chance to express themselves and often gain a deeper understanding of their own communities.

The Challenges of Giving Shelter gives a behind the scenes look at the daily workings of the Winnipeg Humane Society shelter. This is a world of dedicated animal lovers faced with difficult decisions, where sympathetic staff and volunteers manage their compassion fatigue and community expectations to care for cute, cuddly, at times dangerous and homeless animals.

The film gives a better understanding of the people who work on the front lines of this unique facility to offer medical treatment, foster care and adoption services for animals. The daily intake of animals is performed with a ritual of humane care, but the constant dilemma of overpopulation raises the issue of euthanizing animals. The film explores the personal aspects of work, societal responsibility and the challenges of providing humane treatment to animals.

“The film provides a glimpse into the complexity of shelter life.  It demonstrates how our days are filled with highs and lows; life and death,” said Aileen White, Communications Director, “Kevin immersed himself into shelter life.  The staff became so familiar with his presence that the result is a very intimate and moving portrait.  I am grateful for this opportunity WITH ART provided us. Without it, we would not have been able to work with such an outstanding filmmaker and to share this story with our community.”

“Filming on location at the Humane Society gave me a new appreciation for the work done by these caring and dedicated people.  There is so much more to the typical headlines of the cute cats and dogs in this shelter needing homes. This is a fascinating place full of stories of interesting people and complicated issues being played out on a daily basis,” said filmmaker Kevin Nikkel.

“This film is a wonderful example of the power of art to reflect a rarely seen perspective,” said Carol Phillips, Executive Director of the Winnipeg Arts Council. “You can’t help but experience a greater sense of empathy for the animals and the people who work with them when watching this film. That is art at work.”


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Fri, 03 May 2013 10:52:06 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,287;The-Challenges-of-Giving-Shelter http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,287;The-Challenges-of-Giving-Shelter Posted in: News, Press-Release

PLEASE NOTE: The 7 pm screening is now FULL. A second screening at 8:45 pm has been added. Please RSVP by e-mailing communications@winnipeghumanesociety.ca or calling 204 982 3555

A new documentary about the Winnipeg Humane Society will premiere May 14th, 7 p.m.  The film was made possible through the Winnipeg Arts Council’s Community WITH ART Program.  It was a collaborative process whereby the filmmaker was given access to The WHS to discover the focus and theme of this film.

The Winnipeg Arts Council’s Community WITH ART Program partners professional artists with community groups to work on community identity, issues, and shared goals through the development of an art project. By engaging in the artistic process and interacting with professional artists, people are given a chance to express themselves and often gain a deeper understanding of their own communities.

The Challenges of Giving Shelter gives a behind the scenes look at the daily workings of the Winnipeg Humane Society shelter. This is a world of dedicated animal lovers faced with difficult decisions, where sympathetic staff and volunteers manage their compassion fatigue and community expectations to care for cute, cuddly, at times dangerous and homeless animals.

The film gives a better understanding of the people who work on the front lines of this unique facility to offer medical treatment, foster care and adoption services for animals. The daily intake of animals is performed with a ritual of humane care, but the constant dilemma of overpopulation raises the issue of euthanizing animals. The film explores the personal aspects of work, societal responsibility and the challenges of providing humane treatment to animals.

“The film provides a glimpse into the complexity of shelter life.  It demonstrates how our days are filled with highs and lows; life and death,” said Aileen White, Communications Director, “Kevin immersed himself into shelter life.  The staff became so familiar with his presence that the result is a very intimate and moving portrait.  I am grateful for this opportunity WITH ART provided us. Without it, we would not have been able to work with such an outstanding filmmaker and to share this story with our community.”

“Filming on location at the Humane Society gave me a new appreciation for the work done by these caring and dedicated people.  There is so much more to the typical headlines of the cute cats and dogs in this shelter needing homes. This is a fascinating place full of stories of interesting people and complicated issues being played out on a daily basis,” said filmmaker Kevin Nikkel.

“This film is a wonderful example of the power of art to reflect a rarely seen perspective,” said Carol Phillips, Executive Director of the Winnipeg Arts Council. “You can’t help but experience a greater sense of empathy for the animals and the people who work with them when watching this film. That is art at work.”


]]>
May Day Spay Day: Calling All Cat Owners, Bring Your Unfixed Feline to The WHS Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Winnipeg Humane Society is having a ‘May Day Spay Day’ event in an effort to fix female felines and prevent unwanted litters. On Wednesday, May 29, a team of WHS veterinarians plan on reaching, and hopefully surpassing, the goal of 100 spays in an 8-hour period.

Spay surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range within $125 - $225. People who live on social assistance or fixed incomes and who reside in Winnipeg will pay only $35, this includes the spay surgery and vaccination. “We are hoping this event will be an incentive for people who have delayed for timing or cost purposes to finally get this surgery done before their cat has babies,” said Dr. Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health.

“We are targeting female cats as they carry the litters, and can easily produce a litter or two over these next few months,” said Dr. Anseeuw. People with a male cat who live on social assistance or fixed incomes can still contact the WHS and make an appointment for a later date. The overall goal for this one-day event is to reduce cat overpopulation, particularly at a time – June thru October - when unwanted litters overwhelm shelters and neighborhoods.

Interested pet owners looking to book a surgery for ‘May Day Spay Day’ should call 204-888-7627 (SNAP), or visit The WHS. These pet owners will be asked to bring their notice of assessment or social assistance documents to find out if they qualify for the subsidized rate of $35.

Cats should be a minimum of 4 months of age, in good health, should be under the care of a veterinarian and be up to date with vaccinations. Cats must be transported to and from their appointment in a pet carrier.

###

About: The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, memberships and bequests, The WHS also offers pets and dogs for adoption by the public. All pets offered for adoption have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about dogs for adoption or The WHS please visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Thu, 02 May 2013 09:08:59 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,286;May-Day-Spay-Day-Calling-All-Cat-Owners-Bring-Your-Unfixed-Feline-to-The-WHS http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,286;May-Day-Spay-Day-Calling-All-Cat-Owners-Bring-Your-Unfixed-Feline-to-The-WHS Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Winnipeg Humane Society is having a ‘May Day Spay Day’ event in an effort to fix female felines and prevent unwanted litters. On Wednesday, May 29, a team of WHS veterinarians plan on reaching, and hopefully surpassing, the goal of 100 spays in an 8-hour period.

Spay surgeries at Winnipeg veterinarian clinics typically range within $125 - $225. People who live on social assistance or fixed incomes and who reside in Winnipeg will pay only $35, this includes the spay surgery and vaccination. “We are hoping this event will be an incentive for people who have delayed for timing or cost purposes to finally get this surgery done before their cat has babies,” said Dr. Dr. Erika Anseeuw, WHS Director of Animal Health.

“We are targeting female cats as they carry the litters, and can easily produce a litter or two over these next few months,” said Dr. Anseeuw. People with a male cat who live on social assistance or fixed incomes can still contact the WHS and make an appointment for a later date. The overall goal for this one-day event is to reduce cat overpopulation, particularly at a time – June thru October - when unwanted litters overwhelm shelters and neighborhoods.

Interested pet owners looking to book a surgery for ‘May Day Spay Day’ should call 204-888-7627 (SNAP), or visit The WHS. These pet owners will be asked to bring their notice of assessment or social assistance documents to find out if they qualify for the subsidized rate of $35.

Cats should be a minimum of 4 months of age, in good health, should be under the care of a veterinarian and be up to date with vaccinations. Cats must be transported to and from their appointment in a pet carrier.

###

About: The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect all animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, memberships and bequests, The WHS also offers pets and dogs for adoption by the public. All pets offered for adoption have been spayed or neutered, received necessary shots and treatments, and a behavioural assessment. If you’d like to learn more about dogs for adoption or The WHS please visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Drink coffee, help The WHS!

 Looking for a simple and delicious way to support The Winnipeg Humane Society? Well we have the perfect solution: RESQROAST. It’s a new concept that brings Artisan Coffee directly to your front door. When you sign up for a RESQROAST coffee subscription you will receive two, always different, 12 oz bags of artisan coffee each month. The contents of the box are curated by coffee experts, roasted in carbon neutral facilities, and feature Fair Trade, Rain Forest Alliance certified, and coffee that has been sourced from small independent farms. If you sign up for a 3-month subscription you will receive a free eco-friendly RESQROAST tote bag.

The best part? 15% of every purchase goes directly to us.  All you have to do is select The Winnipeg Humane Society during the purchasing process.

So what are you waiting for? Go get caffeinated at www.resqroast.com.


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Tue, 23 Apr 2013 15:20:06 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,285;Drink-coffee-help-The-WHS- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,285;Drink-coffee-help-The-WHS-

 Looking for a simple and delicious way to support The Winnipeg Humane Society? Well we have the perfect solution: RESQROAST. It’s a new concept that brings Artisan Coffee directly to your front door. When you sign up for a RESQROAST coffee subscription you will receive two, always different, 12 oz bags of artisan coffee each month. The contents of the box are curated by coffee experts, roasted in carbon neutral facilities, and feature Fair Trade, Rain Forest Alliance certified, and coffee that has been sourced from small independent farms. If you sign up for a 3-month subscription you will receive a free eco-friendly RESQROAST tote bag.

The best part? 15% of every purchase goes directly to us.  All you have to do is select The Winnipeg Humane Society during the purchasing process.

So what are you waiting for? Go get caffeinated at www.resqroast.com.


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The Winnipeg Humane Society Launches iPhone Application Posted in: News, Press-Release

Sparky and Fluffy might not be tech-savvy enough to use a smartphone app, but their owners sure are. The Winnipeg Humane Society (The WHS) is excited to announce the launch of its first application for iPhone users.

The WHS iPhone application was developed to engage Winnipeg’s pet lovers on the mobile devices being used to most frequently to view their pet listings.  Whether it’s on the couch, or on the go when you are trying to find a place to take your furry friend for a walk, the application keeps you in touch with the latest from The WHS. 

The most engaging feature is the pet postcard feature; allowing users to create their own adopt-a-pet postcard and send it to their friends using their preferred social media network.
Also included in the app are the Winnipeg Humane Societies’ event information, donation pages, latest social media feeds and a comprehensive location-enabled directory of adoption facilities, pet-friendly apartments and off leash dog parks.

“Like our pets, mobile devices have become our everyday companions,” said Aileen White, Director of Communications of the Winnipeg Humane Society.  “With the release of the Winnipeg Humane Society iPhone application, we will be able to engage and provide valuable services to our supporters on an anytime, anywhere basis.”

The WHS iPhone application was developed by Purple Forge. Purple Forge is the world’s leading provider of mobile applications to associations, governments and non-profits.  Mobile applications helps organizations like the WHS to cut down on the amount of printed material they have to develop as well as get interested parties connected with critical, location specific information on-demand.  

"WHS is on the cutting edge of humane societies in Canada in providing both mobile access and services to its supporters," said Brian Hurley, CEO of Purple Forge. "This mobile application will allow them to encourage greater participation and awareness of their activities in their community, which will benefit of the animals they work so hard to protect and provide safe homes for.”

This free app is available for download in the iTunes App Store or by visiting The WHS website.

###

About The WHS:
The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, memberships and bequests, The WHS also adopts cats, dogs and critters. All adoptable pets have been spayed or neutered, a health check, and a behavioural assessment. http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Wed, 17 Apr 2013 15:35:40 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,284;The-Winnipeg-Humane-Society-Launches-iPhone-Application- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,284;The-Winnipeg-Humane-Society-Launches-iPhone-Application- Posted in: News, Press-Release

Sparky and Fluffy might not be tech-savvy enough to use a smartphone app, but their owners sure are. The Winnipeg Humane Society (The WHS) is excited to announce the launch of its first application for iPhone users.

The WHS iPhone application was developed to engage Winnipeg’s pet lovers on the mobile devices being used to most frequently to view their pet listings.  Whether it’s on the couch, or on the go when you are trying to find a place to take your furry friend for a walk, the application keeps you in touch with the latest from The WHS. 

The most engaging feature is the pet postcard feature; allowing users to create their own adopt-a-pet postcard and send it to their friends using their preferred social media network.
Also included in the app are the Winnipeg Humane Societies’ event information, donation pages, latest social media feeds and a comprehensive location-enabled directory of adoption facilities, pet-friendly apartments and off leash dog parks.

“Like our pets, mobile devices have become our everyday companions,” said Aileen White, Director of Communications of the Winnipeg Humane Society.  “With the release of the Winnipeg Humane Society iPhone application, we will be able to engage and provide valuable services to our supporters on an anytime, anywhere basis.”

The WHS iPhone application was developed by Purple Forge. Purple Forge is the world’s leading provider of mobile applications to associations, governments and non-profits.  Mobile applications helps organizations like the WHS to cut down on the amount of printed material they have to develop as well as get interested parties connected with critical, location specific information on-demand.  

"WHS is on the cutting edge of humane societies in Canada in providing both mobile access and services to its supporters," said Brian Hurley, CEO of Purple Forge. "This mobile application will allow them to encourage greater participation and awareness of their activities in their community, which will benefit of the animals they work so hard to protect and provide safe homes for.”

This free app is available for download in the iTunes App Store or by visiting The WHS website.

###

About The WHS:
The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity. Funded primarily by donations, memberships and bequests, The WHS also adopts cats, dogs and critters. All adoptable pets have been spayed or neutered, a health check, and a behavioural assessment. http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Winnipeg Humane Society warns of fraudulent door-to-door soliciting Posted in: News, Press-Release

(WINNIPEG) – The Winnipeg Humane Society (The WHS) is cautioning home owners against fraudulent fundraising on behalf of the animal shelter. The WHS is not conducting any door-to-door campaigns at this time. For more information on how to donate to The WHS, visit our donation page or call 204-982-2041. The Winnipeg Police Service has been notified.


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Thu, 11 Apr 2013 15:16:11 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,282;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-warns-of-fraudulent-door-to-door-soliciting http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,282;Winnipeg-Humane-Society-warns-of-fraudulent-door-to-door-soliciting Posted in: News, Press-Release

(WINNIPEG) – The Winnipeg Humane Society (The WHS) is cautioning home owners against fraudulent fundraising on behalf of the animal shelter. The WHS is not conducting any door-to-door campaigns at this time. For more information on how to donate to The WHS, visit our donation page or call 204-982-2041. The Winnipeg Police Service has been notified.


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WHS Spring Sale!

The WHS has winter (and miscellaneous) stock on sale! This blow out is for a limited time, so come to 45 Hurst Way today and stock up on items for your furry friends!

Items we have on sale:

  • Winter jackets and sweaters 75% off
  • Winter boots 50% off
  • Winnipeg Jets dog apparel 30% off
  • Chuck it and kong products 25% off
  • Select cat toys 30% off
  • Select bowls 40% off
  • Dog back pack 30% off


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Thu, 28 Mar 2013 15:47:37 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,280;WHS-Spring-Sale- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,280;WHS-Spring-Sale-

The WHS has winter (and miscellaneous) stock on sale! This blow out is for a limited time, so come to 45 Hurst Way today and stock up on items for your furry friends!

Items we have on sale:

  • Winter jackets and sweaters 75% off
  • Winter boots 50% off
  • Winnipeg Jets dog apparel 30% off
  • Chuck it and kong products 25% off
  • Select cat toys 30% off
  • Select bowls 40% off
  • Dog back pack 30% off


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WHS applauds work of Mercy for Animals revealing suffering of Manitoba Pigs Posted in: News, Press-Release

December 11, 2012

WHS applauds work of Mercy for Animals revealing suffering of Manitoba Pigs
(WINNIPEG) The Winnipeg Humane Society is applauding the efforts of Mercy for Animals Canada for its work in capturing video that shows the horrifying conditions that pigs in Manitoba are raised in by some members of the pork industry.

 The video was released to the media and public on Monday, December 10, 2012. It  documents the suffering of pigs at a Puratone farm located in Arborg, Manitoba.

“This barn is not a one-off situation, this is a level of abuse and neglect that is a standing practice in many other barns,” said Bill McDonald, Winnipeg Humane Society CEO.  “I implore every consumer to use their purchasing power and demand humane treatment for food animals through their grocery chain.”

The gestation crates shown in the video released by Mercy for Animals Canada are the focus of The WHS’ Quit Stalling campaign, which urges pork producers to phase out this inhumane practice. The crates are approximately 2 feet wide by 7 feet long and a sow will live her entire life in it. Many of the larger pork producers have pledged to phase out these crates by 2017, including Maple Leaf Foods. Recently the Puratone Corporation farms have been acquired by Maple Leaf Foods. 

“Maple Leaf will now be operating over 60 pig barns in Manitoba and stated as recently as March, 2012, in a letter to me, that they would meet their conversion commitment in 2017,” states McDonald. The WHS will be communicating with Maple Leaf about this video to urge the company to adhere to the committed date of 2017 to phase out gestation stalls in Manitoba.

 

###

About The WHS:

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity.

Funded primarily by donations, The WHS also offers cat, dog and other critter adoptions. All adoptable pets have been spayed or neutered, had a health check and a behavioural assessment. For more information visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Mon, 17 Dec 2012 10:19:08 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,273;WHS-applauds-work-of-Mercy-for-Animals-revealing-suffering-of-Manitoba-Pigs http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,273;WHS-applauds-work-of-Mercy-for-Animals-revealing-suffering-of-Manitoba-Pigs Posted in: News, Press-Release

December 11, 2012

WHS applauds work of Mercy for Animals revealing suffering of Manitoba Pigs
(WINNIPEG) The Winnipeg Humane Society is applauding the efforts of Mercy for Animals Canada for its work in capturing video that shows the horrifying conditions that pigs in Manitoba are raised in by some members of the pork industry.

 The video was released to the media and public on Monday, December 10, 2012. It  documents the suffering of pigs at a Puratone farm located in Arborg, Manitoba.

“This barn is not a one-off situation, this is a level of abuse and neglect that is a standing practice in many other barns,” said Bill McDonald, Winnipeg Humane Society CEO.  “I implore every consumer to use their purchasing power and demand humane treatment for food animals through their grocery chain.”

The gestation crates shown in the video released by Mercy for Animals Canada are the focus of The WHS’ Quit Stalling campaign, which urges pork producers to phase out this inhumane practice. The crates are approximately 2 feet wide by 7 feet long and a sow will live her entire life in it. Many of the larger pork producers have pledged to phase out these crates by 2017, including Maple Leaf Foods. Recently the Puratone Corporation farms have been acquired by Maple Leaf Foods. 

“Maple Leaf will now be operating over 60 pig barns in Manitoba and stated as recently as March, 2012, in a letter to me, that they would meet their conversion commitment in 2017,” states McDonald. The WHS will be communicating with Maple Leaf about this video to urge the company to adhere to the committed date of 2017 to phase out gestation stalls in Manitoba.

 

###

About The WHS:

The Winnipeg Humane Society is a registered charity and non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals from suffering and to promote their welfare and dignity.

Funded primarily by donations, The WHS also offers cat, dog and other critter adoptions. All adoptable pets have been spayed or neutered, had a health check and a behavioural assessment. For more information visit http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca


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Free Microchip ID: Pet Identification Adoption Day Posted in: News, Press-Release

Free Microchip ID: Pet Identification Adoption Day

First Event for the Shelter and Rescue Alliance of Manitoba (SARAM)

(WINNIPEG) – On November 10, D’Arcy’s A.R.C. (Animal Rescue Centre), Manitoba Mutts Dog Rescue, The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) and Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter are coming together to provide a free identification microchip to animals who are adopted on that day from any of the four shelters. These four participating rescue shelters make up the Shelter and Rescue Alliance of Manitoba (SARAM)

D’Arcy’s A.R.C., The WHS, and Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter will adopt their respective animals at each of their locations; Manitoba Mutts will have adoptable animals at Petcetera at 915 Empress Street.  Every animal available for adoption will have an identification tattoo and a microchip, “The microchip is one more way to reunite pets with their owners in the event the pet is lost.  We encourage pet owners to take every step to ensure their pet can be easily identified," stated Carla Martinelli-Irvine, Founder & Executive Director, Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter

“Having no ID at all is one of the reasons shelters are over flowing with unwanted pets,” stated D'Arcy Johnston, Founder & Executive Director, D'Arcy’s A.R.C., “A microchip is another way to ensure you get your best friend back to you. Keep in mind a tattoo can fade over time making it difficult for rescue groups to reunite the pet with its rightful owner.”

A microchip helps to easily and quickly identify an animal and its owners. Microchips are also more reliable than a tattoo that can fade or a collar tag that can get lost, however SARAM recommends having all three forms of identification in order to ensure pets have the best chance of returning home if they are lost. Typically there is a fee charged to an adopter if they choose to microchip their pet.

"It is essential pet owners keep their pet's information up to date," says Becky Nordquist, Executive Director of Manitoba Mutts, "if you change addresses, be sure to update your information with the shelter you adopted from as well as the registered microchip company."

For more information, contact:

D’Arcy’s A.R.C.:
D’Arcy Johnston, Founder & Executive Director
730B Century Street
Wpg, MB  R3H 0M1
P: 204-888-2266
E: thearcwinnipeg@gmail.com
The Winnipeg Humane Society:
Hannah Rose Pratt, Communications Coordinator
45 Hurst Way
Wpg, MB R3T 0R3
P: 204-988-8810
E: hannahp@winnipeghumanesociety.ca

Manitoba Mutts Rescue:
Becky Nordquist, Executive Director
1-160 Dalhousie Drive
Wpg, MB R3T 2Z1
P: 204-803-8114
E: info@manitobamutts.org

Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter:
Carla Martinelli-Irvine, Founder & Executive Director
3062 Portage Ave
Wpg, MB, R3K 0Y1
P: 204-832-9880
E: info@wpgpet.ca 


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Mon, 05 Nov 2012 11:05:46 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,268;Free-Microchip-ID-Pet-Identification-Adoption-Day http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,268;Free-Microchip-ID-Pet-Identification-Adoption-Day Posted in: News, Press-Release

Free Microchip ID: Pet Identification Adoption Day

First Event for the Shelter and Rescue Alliance of Manitoba (SARAM)

(WINNIPEG) – On November 10, D’Arcy’s A.R.C. (Animal Rescue Centre), Manitoba Mutts Dog Rescue, The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) and Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter are coming together to provide a free identification microchip to animals who are adopted on that day from any of the four shelters. These four participating rescue shelters make up the Shelter and Rescue Alliance of Manitoba (SARAM)

D’Arcy’s A.R.C., The WHS, and Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter will adopt their respective animals at each of their locations; Manitoba Mutts will have adoptable animals at Petcetera at 915 Empress Street.  Every animal available for adoption will have an identification tattoo and a microchip, “The microchip is one more way to reunite pets with their owners in the event the pet is lost.  We encourage pet owners to take every step to ensure their pet can be easily identified," stated Carla Martinelli-Irvine, Founder & Executive Director, Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter

“Having no ID at all is one of the reasons shelters are over flowing with unwanted pets,” stated D'Arcy Johnston, Founder & Executive Director, D'Arcy’s A.R.C., “A microchip is another way to ensure you get your best friend back to you. Keep in mind a tattoo can fade over time making it difficult for rescue groups to reunite the pet with its rightful owner.”

A microchip helps to easily and quickly identify an animal and its owners. Microchips are also more reliable than a tattoo that can fade or a collar tag that can get lost, however SARAM recommends having all three forms of identification in order to ensure pets have the best chance of returning home if they are lost. Typically there is a fee charged to an adopter if they choose to microchip their pet.

"It is essential pet owners keep their pet's information up to date," says Becky Nordquist, Executive Director of Manitoba Mutts, "if you change addresses, be sure to update your information with the shelter you adopted from as well as the registered microchip company."

For more information, contact:

D’Arcy’s A.R.C.:
D’Arcy Johnston, Founder & Executive Director
730B Century Street
Wpg, MB  R3H 0M1
P: 204-888-2266
E: thearcwinnipeg@gmail.com
The Winnipeg Humane Society:
Hannah Rose Pratt, Communications Coordinator
45 Hurst Way
Wpg, MB R3T 0R3
P: 204-988-8810
E: hannahp@winnipeghumanesociety.ca

Manitoba Mutts Rescue:
Becky Nordquist, Executive Director
1-160 Dalhousie Drive
Wpg, MB R3T 2Z1
P: 204-803-8114
E: info@manitobamutts.org

Winnipeg Pet Rescue Shelter:
Carla Martinelli-Irvine, Founder & Executive Director
3062 Portage Ave
Wpg, MB, R3K 0Y1
P: 204-832-9880
E: info@wpgpet.ca 


]]>
DNA My Dog Guessing Contest

Do you always have the answer when someone says, “What kind of dog is that?” Do you fancy yourself a “dog whisperer”? Well, here’s your chance to prove you’re an expert in the furry, four-legged friend department!

From October 17-24, we will post a number of photos of different dogs in a Facebook album. At this time, we invite people to guess what breed mix these dogs are by posting a comment on each of the photos. At the end of the week, we will choose the response on each photo that is closest to the actual results. We will then put these names in a hat and choose a winner!

The winner will receive a DNA My Dog Canine Genetic Test (with the processing fee waived) so they can do the test on their own dog completely for free!

We encourage you to formulate your submission by taking a guess at ALL of the different breeds each dog may have in him/her. This is to avoid many of the same answers on each photo. Be creative and think outside the box. Some of the breeds are quite surprising! Please limit your guesses to one per photo.

So as not to exclude those who don’t have Facebook, we will also the photos in an album on our website which can be found here. If you’d like, you may email your guesses using the photo number to identify to outreach@winnipeghumanesociety.ca.

If you don’t win the contest, don’t worry. DNA My Dog Canine Genetic Tests are available at The WHS gift shop for $10*. DNA My Dog's simple cheek swab DNA test lets you learn every breed in your dog and gain insight into the unique genetic background of your dog including the history of their breed, personality traits, exercise levels, and so much more!

Happy “Hy-paw-thesising”!

*An additional $49.99 is paid to DNA My Dog at the time of the test to cover the processing fee.


]]>
Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:41:07 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,266;DNA-My-Dog-Guessing-Contest http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,266;DNA-My-Dog-Guessing-Contest

Do you always have the answer when someone says, “What kind of dog is that?” Do you fancy yourself a “dog whisperer”? Well, here’s your chance to prove you’re an expert in the furry, four-legged friend department!

From October 17-24, we will post a number of photos of different dogs in a Facebook album. At this time, we invite people to guess what breed mix these dogs are by posting a comment on each of the photos. At the end of the week, we will choose the response on each photo that is closest to the actual results. We will then put these names in a hat and choose a winner!

The winner will receive a DNA My Dog Canine Genetic Test (with the processing fee waived) so they can do the test on their own dog completely for free!

We encourage you to formulate your submission by taking a guess at ALL of the different breeds each dog may have in him/her. This is to avoid many of the same answers on each photo. Be creative and think outside the box. Some of the breeds are quite surprising! Please limit your guesses to one per photo.

So as not to exclude those who don’t have Facebook, we will also the photos in an album on our website which can be found here. If you’d like, you may email your guesses using the photo number to identify to outreach@winnipeghumanesociety.ca.

If you don’t win the contest, don’t worry. DNA My Dog Canine Genetic Tests are available at The WHS gift shop for $10*. DNA My Dog's simple cheek swab DNA test lets you learn every breed in your dog and gain insight into the unique genetic background of your dog including the history of their breed, personality traits, exercise levels, and so much more!

Happy “Hy-paw-thesising”!

*An additional $49.99 is paid to DNA My Dog at the time of the test to cover the processing fee.


]]>
Farm Animals at the forefront

On Monday, October 29th, from 7-8:30 p.m., The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) will host an evening event put on by the Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC). The event is free to attend and open to the public, and will provide information on how ordinary people can make a difference for farm animals.

Dr. Olivier Berreville will be the evening’s feature speaker and will share his knowledge about the humane treatment of farm animals. Dr. Berreville is teaching a new course called Advocacy and Animal Rights at the University of Manitoba. He is also the Scientific Advisor for Canadians for Ethical Treatment of Food Animals. Dr. Dana Medoro from the Farm Animal Welfare Committee will also be presenting and will speak about crisis capitalism and pork production.

“People want to know where their food comes from and how it was treated before it arrived on their dinner plate,” says Bill McDonald, WHS CEO, “The WHS host events like this because we believe in educating the public on how to make humane choices.”

The event will take place in The WHS classroom (multi-purpose room) and light refreshments will be served.


]]>
Fri, 05 Oct 2012 09:54:42 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,265;Farm-Animals-at-the-forefront http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,265;Farm-Animals-at-the-forefront

On Monday, October 29th, from 7-8:30 p.m., The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) will host an evening event put on by the Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC). The event is free to attend and open to the public, and will provide information on how ordinary people can make a difference for farm animals.

Dr. Olivier Berreville will be the evening’s feature speaker and will share his knowledge about the humane treatment of farm animals. Dr. Berreville is teaching a new course called Advocacy and Animal Rights at the University of Manitoba. He is also the Scientific Advisor for Canadians for Ethical Treatment of Food Animals. Dr. Dana Medoro from the Farm Animal Welfare Committee will also be presenting and will speak about crisis capitalism and pork production.

“People want to know where their food comes from and how it was treated before it arrived on their dinner plate,” says Bill McDonald, WHS CEO, “The WHS host events like this because we believe in educating the public on how to make humane choices.”

The event will take place in The WHS classroom (multi-purpose room) and light refreshments will be served.


]]>
Corrections, Fall Newsletter

On Page 4 of the Fall Newsletter, the second line of Leagh's poem should read:

"Peering through the bush."

In the first column, Leah should read as "Leagh."

On Page 7 of the Fall Newsletter, Bragi Simundsson's phone number is incorrect.

The correct contact information for the Simundsson Farm is:

Heather & Bragi Simundsson
Box 26 Arborg MB.
R0C 0A0
1-888-376-2369


]]>
Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:28:37 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,264;Corrections-Fall-Newsletter http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,264;Corrections-Fall-Newsletter

On Page 4 of the Fall Newsletter, the second line of Leagh's poem should read:

"Peering through the bush."

In the first column, Leah should read as "Leagh."

On Page 7 of the Fall Newsletter, Bragi Simundsson's phone number is incorrect.

The correct contact information for the Simundsson Farm is:

Heather & Bragi Simundsson
Box 26 Arborg MB.
R0C 0A0
1-888-376-2369


]]>
Manitobans call for a province-wide ban on cosmetic pesticides Posted in: News, Press-Release

Manitobans call for a province-wide ban on cosmetic pesticides

On June 21, 2012, Manitoba Conservation announced consultations regarding the use of cosmetic pesticides in Manitoba. Health, environment, and labour groups as well as many citizens have joined the call for Manitoba to show national leadership by instituting a comprehensive and effective ban on cosmetic pesticides.

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba supports legislation that:

  • · Prohibits the use, sale and retail display of chemical pesticides for lawns, gardens and non-agricultural landscaping, including by licensed operators;
  • · Is comprehensive in the number of pesticides included under the ban, including new chemicals as they are developed.
  •  Provides for public education about the ban and alternatives to chemical pesticides;
  • · Includes effective mechanisms for enforcement
  • · Is passed in 2012 and takes effect by the spring of 2013

Cosmetic pesticide use is a public health Issue, particularly for children and pets

  • · The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the US National Toxicology Program state that some pesticides can cause cancer.i The Pesticides Literature Review conducted by the Ontario College of Family Physicians, showed “consistent links to serious illnesses, such as cancer, reproductive problems and neurological diseases.”ii
  • · Children are at a greater risk from pesticide exposure than adults because they are closer to the ground and their bodies are still developing.iii
  • Cancer survivors, people suffering from asthma, chemical sensitivities or other health conditions may also be at greater risk from pesticides.
  • · The notion that pesticide use is an individual matter is scientifically incorrect.

Once dispersed, pesticides affect non-target plant, animal and human health in our shared environment.

  • Pets  are smaller and much closer to the ground. They often lie in the grass, they chew the grass and other plants and they lick their paws and groom themselves, thereby ingesting materials that were on the grass. Pesticides are poisons, designed to kill, and they may remain on the ground and in the air for long periods of time.
  • Exposure can even occur in the house, where pesticides are tracked in on people’s shoes or pets’ paws. Studies have shown the presence of 2,4-D in indoor air and on all indoor surfaces after the application of lawn chemicals.
  • These Studies measured the residues of 2,4-D one week before lawn application and one week after. The results showed exposures 10 times higher after the lawn application than before and this was a whole week after it had been applied.
  • There is an increased risk of malignant lymphoma associated with exposure to 2,4-D in dogs. Dogs exposed to lawns treated with chemicals within the previous 7 days were 50 times more likely to have 2,4-D at concentrations of > or = 50 micrograms/l in their urine, than dogs with exposure to lawns than had been treated more than 2 days previously.
  • Both of the above mentioned studies demonstrate that the application of lawn chemicals creates a much longer risk for exposure than what most of us have understood. The warning signs often refer to staying off the grass until it dries or for 48 hours but according to these studies, exposure hazards last for much longer.
  • Another study  links the use of lawn chemicals to bladder cancer in Scottish terriers. The risk of developing bladder cancer was 4 to 7 times greater in the dogs who had been exposed to lawn chemicals. The study also refers to the similarity between human and dog genomes and the genetic predisposition that some dogs and some humans share towards certain types of cancers.
  • In the year, 2000, the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development of the House of Commons, issued a report entitled “Pesticides – Making the Right Choice, For the Protection of Health and the Environment”. That report stated “pesticides are highly poisonous substances designed to kill living organisms... The choice facing us is clear: either to continue with our chronic dependence on pesticides to the detriment of the environment, agricultural sustainability and human health or, to give public health protection clear precedence. We have already done so with tobacco, lead and asbestos. Pesticides should be next.”

To be a part of passing this ban and for more information go to:

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba

www.cosmeticpesticidebanmb.wordpress.com


]]>
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 16:17:12 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,259;Manitobans-call-for-a-province-wide-ban-on-cosmetic-pesticides http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,259;Manitobans-call-for-a-province-wide-ban-on-cosmetic-pesticides Posted in: News, Press-Release

Manitobans call for a province-wide ban on cosmetic pesticides

On June 21, 2012, Manitoba Conservation announced consultations regarding the use of cosmetic pesticides in Manitoba. Health, environment, and labour groups as well as many citizens have joined the call for Manitoba to show national leadership by instituting a comprehensive and effective ban on cosmetic pesticides.

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba supports legislation that:

  • · Prohibits the use, sale and retail display of chemical pesticides for lawns, gardens and non-agricultural landscaping, including by licensed operators;
  • · Is comprehensive in the number of pesticides included under the ban, including new chemicals as they are developed.
  •  Provides for public education about the ban and alternatives to chemical pesticides;
  • · Includes effective mechanisms for enforcement
  • · Is passed in 2012 and takes effect by the spring of 2013

Cosmetic pesticide use is a public health Issue, particularly for children and pets

  • · The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the US National Toxicology Program state that some pesticides can cause cancer.i The Pesticides Literature Review conducted by the Ontario College of Family Physicians, showed “consistent links to serious illnesses, such as cancer, reproductive problems and neurological diseases.”ii
  • · Children are at a greater risk from pesticide exposure than adults because they are closer to the ground and their bodies are still developing.iii
  • Cancer survivors, people suffering from asthma, chemical sensitivities or other health conditions may also be at greater risk from pesticides.
  • · The notion that pesticide use is an individual matter is scientifically incorrect.

Once dispersed, pesticides affect non-target plant, animal and human health in our shared environment.

  • Pets  are smaller and much closer to the ground. They often lie in the grass, they chew the grass and other plants and they lick their paws and groom themselves, thereby ingesting materials that were on the grass. Pesticides are poisons, designed to kill, and they may remain on the ground and in the air for long periods of time.
  • Exposure can even occur in the house, where pesticides are tracked in on people’s shoes or pets’ paws. Studies have shown the presence of 2,4-D in indoor air and on all indoor surfaces after the application of lawn chemicals.
  • These Studies measured the residues of 2,4-D one week before lawn application and one week after. The results showed exposures 10 times higher after the lawn application than before and this was a whole week after it had been applied.
  • There is an increased risk of malignant lymphoma associated with exposure to 2,4-D in dogs. Dogs exposed to lawns treated with chemicals within the previous 7 days were 50 times more likely to have 2,4-D at concentrations of > or = 50 micrograms/l in their urine, than dogs with exposure to lawns than had been treated more than 2 days previously.
  • Both of the above mentioned studies demonstrate that the application of lawn chemicals creates a much longer risk for exposure than what most of us have understood. The warning signs often refer to staying off the grass until it dries or for 48 hours but according to these studies, exposure hazards last for much longer.
  • Another study  links the use of lawn chemicals to bladder cancer in Scottish terriers. The risk of developing bladder cancer was 4 to 7 times greater in the dogs who had been exposed to lawn chemicals. The study also refers to the similarity between human and dog genomes and the genetic predisposition that some dogs and some humans share towards certain types of cancers.
  • In the year, 2000, the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development of the House of Commons, issued a report entitled “Pesticides – Making the Right Choice, For the Protection of Health and the Environment”. That report stated “pesticides are highly poisonous substances designed to kill living organisms... The choice facing us is clear: either to continue with our chronic dependence on pesticides to the detriment of the environment, agricultural sustainability and human health or, to give public health protection clear precedence. We have already done so with tobacco, lead and asbestos. Pesticides should be next.”

To be a part of passing this ban and for more information go to:

Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Manitoba

www.cosmeticpesticidebanmb.wordpress.com


]]>
Scratch My Belly Please: the WHS Invites Manitobans to Write and Share Pet Haikus Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Winnipeg Humane Society will be joining in the fun this year at the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival. The WHS is holding a contest during the Fringe calling on all Manitobans to scratch their creative itch and write pet-related haiku poems. An example:

 He reads the paper
How dare he do such a thing?
I sprawl out on top

 “We are always looking for fun and interesting ways to get people excited and talking about animals,” said Aileen White, Director of Communications and Public Affairs, “We are thrilled to be involved with such a great, local festival like the Fringe and happy to celebrate the thriving creativity in our city.” 

To enter, Manitobans must share their original, pet-related haiku poems on The WHS’s Facebook page between July 18 and 31. By doing so, they will be eligible to win tickets to Rainbow Stage’s performance of Annie, IMAX, Cinematheque and The Globe Cinema. Three draws of all eligible entries will take place at 4 p.m. on July 31.

Prize #1 - Voucher redeemable for two tickets to Rainbow Stage's performance of Annie on August 9, 2012, two passes to IMAX with a snack voucher, two passes to Cinematheque and two passes to The Globe Cinema.

Prize #2 - Two passes to IMAX with a snack voucher, two passes to Cinematheque and two passes to The Globe Cinema.

Prize #3 - Four passes to The Globe Cinema.

Haikus are short, 17-syllable poems of Japanese origin. To be considered a haiku, the first line has to have five syllables, the second has seven and the third has five. Examples of Pet Haikus can be found below.

The Winnipeg Humane Society will be at the Fringe Festival from July 27-29, located in the non-profit tent on Arthur Street.

Examples:

Tangled in the leash
Help! I'm going to fall over!
Let's walk nicely now

I watch the human
Running around like a mouse
This makes me sleepy

Large, white & hairy
The human sweeps every day
Why does he bother?

***This contest is now closed***


]]>
Fri, 13 Jul 2012 08:47:29 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,255;Scratch-My-Belly-Please-the-WHS-Invites-Manitobans-to-Write-and-Share-Pet-Haikus http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,255;Scratch-My-Belly-Please-the-WHS-Invites-Manitobans-to-Write-and-Share-Pet-Haikus Posted in: News, Press-Release

The Winnipeg Humane Society will be joining in the fun this year at the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival. The WHS is holding a contest during the Fringe calling on all Manitobans to scratch their creative itch and write pet-related haiku poems. An example:

 He reads the paper
How dare he do such a thing?
I sprawl out on top

 “We are always looking for fun and interesting ways to get people excited and talking about animals,” said Aileen White, Director of Communications and Public Affairs, “We are thrilled to be involved with such a great, local festival like the Fringe and happy to celebrate the thriving creativity in our city.” 

To enter, Manitobans must share their original, pet-related haiku poems on The WHS’s Facebook page between July 18 and 31. By doing so, they will be eligible to win tickets to Rainbow Stage’s performance of Annie, IMAX, Cinematheque and The Globe Cinema. Three draws of all eligible entries will take place at 4 p.m. on July 31.

Prize #1 - Voucher redeemable for two tickets to Rainbow Stage's performance of Annie on August 9, 2012, two passes to IMAX with a snack voucher, two passes to Cinematheque and two passes to The Globe Cinema.

Prize #2 - Two passes to IMAX with a snack voucher, two passes to Cinematheque and two passes to The Globe Cinema.

Prize #3 - Four passes to The Globe Cinema.

Haikus are short, 17-syllable poems of Japanese origin. To be considered a haiku, the first line has to have five syllables, the second has seven and the third has five. Examples of Pet Haikus can be found below.

The Winnipeg Humane Society will be at the Fringe Festival from July 27-29, located in the non-profit tent on Arthur Street.

Examples:

Tangled in the leash
Help! I'm going to fall over!
Let's walk nicely now

I watch the human
Running around like a mouse
This makes me sleepy

Large, white & hairy
The human sweeps every day
Why does he bother?

***This contest is now closed***


]]>
Job Opportunies at The WHS

Emergency Dispatcher                                        Full-Time

 

Emergency Responder/Dispatcher                        Part-Time

 

Adoption Counsellor                                           Part-Time

 


Shelter Medicine Externship                                  Varies

Animal Advisor                                                   Part-Time

Important Note

Resumes must be accompanied by an application to be considered.  Resumes and applications can be submitted in person, by mail, by fax or by email.

Mail or Drop Off

The Winnipeg Humane Society
45 Hurst Way
Winnipeg, MB R3T 0R3

Fax

204-663-9401
Please mark ‘Attention To’ the pertinent person or department as mentioned in the job description.


]]>
Thu, 21 Jun 2012 00:00:00 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,205;Job-Opportunies-at-The-WHS http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,205;Job-Opportunies-at-The-WHS

Emergency Dispatcher                                        Full-Time

 

Emergency Responder/Dispatcher                        Part-Time

 

Adoption Counsellor                                           Part-Time

 


Shelter Medicine Externship                                  Varies

Animal Advisor                                                   Part-Time

Important Note

Resumes must be accompanied by an application to be considered.  Resumes and applications can be submitted in person, by mail, by fax or by email.

Mail or Drop Off

The Winnipeg Humane Society
45 Hurst Way
Winnipeg, MB R3T 0R3

Fax

204-663-9401
Please mark ‘Attention To’ the pertinent person or department as mentioned in the job description.


]]>
Bear cub Makoon released into wild

We are saddened to announce that the province of Manitoba has confirmed that two bear cubs (including Makoon) being cared for by the Assiniboine Park Zoo have been released into the wild.

The Winnipeg Humane Society has learned from bear biology experts that this early release presents as low as 5% chance of survival.

“The province of Manitoba has not acted in the best interests of the bear cub Makoon" said Bill McDonald, WHS CEO.

Bear expert, Dr. John Beecham, Ph.D advises the best opportunity for releasing cubs would have been when they are large enough and old enough to defend themselves from predators. This best age is 17-18 months of age.

“At 5 months of age, Makoon would only be 30 lbs. A release at this age means death by starvation or being killed by a predator,” stated McDonald.

The Winnipeg Humane Society was consulting with WHS legal counsel to present an application to court to stop the release of Makoon when the province confirmed they had released two bear cubs.


]]>
Tue, 19 Jun 2012 13:29:35 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,249;Bear-cub-Makoon-released-into-wild http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,249;Bear-cub-Makoon-released-into-wild

We are saddened to announce that the province of Manitoba has confirmed that two bear cubs (including Makoon) being cared for by the Assiniboine Park Zoo have been released into the wild.

The Winnipeg Humane Society has learned from bear biology experts that this early release presents as low as 5% chance of survival.

“The province of Manitoba has not acted in the best interests of the bear cub Makoon" said Bill McDonald, WHS CEO.

Bear expert, Dr. John Beecham, Ph.D advises the best opportunity for releasing cubs would have been when they are large enough and old enough to defend themselves from predators. This best age is 17-18 months of age.

“At 5 months of age, Makoon would only be 30 lbs. A release at this age means death by starvation or being killed by a predator,” stated McDonald.

The Winnipeg Humane Society was consulting with WHS legal counsel to present an application to court to stop the release of Makoon when the province confirmed they had released two bear cubs.


]]>
The LOVE Animal Hospital at the Red River Exhibition

We believe that the LOVE Animal Hospital at the Red River Ex is a terrific opportunity to reach and educate people who wouldn’t otherwise be reached. Our objectives are to educate people in the importance of spaying and neutering their animals, with the ultimate goal of reducing the amount of homeless animals in our city. Guests of the Pet Centre will be encouraged to view the surgeries in the surgery suite, just like our WHS guests do on shelter tours.

It is important for The WHS to reassure our supporters that the cats who are going to be spayed, will receive the same fantastic care they would receive if the surgery was done at our WHS clinic. This means the cats will not be subjected to any higher levels of stress that could impact the surgery, and will have an enclosed room to recover in. The clinic will be inspected by the Manitoba Veterinarian Medical Association, and the new structure will be identical to those at The WHS.

FAQs Surrounding the LOVE Animal Hospital

Q: Will the cats that are having the surgery be more stressed because they are at the Ex?

A: The Pet Centre inside Discovery Place is located in a brand new, completely enclosed building that is set aside from the rest of the Ex. The surgery suite inside will be in its own, enclosed area and will provide a quiet, secluded area for cats to be brought into the facility and prepared for surgery. The volunteers who will be transporting the cats to and from The WHS will drive right up to the Pet Centre prior to the grounds opening, and will avoid the noise and activity of the Ex. The WHS staff and volunteers will be on hand throughout their care to ensure the safety and well-being of the cats.

Q: How will the clinic be set up?

A: The surgery suite at the Pet Centre will be almost identical to the clinic at The WHS. It will be an enclosed area inside the Pet Centre and will be up to the standards of any clinic. The surgeries will be performed in an enclosed room with windows so that viewers can see what the vets are doing. There will also be another quiet, enclosed room with no windows where the cats will await surgery and recover in a peaceful environment.  The surgery suite will be similar to the clinic at The WHS where people of all ages on tours and in day camps are encouraged to view the surgeries through the large windows.

Q: Will the surgeries be performed in a sterile environment?

A: Yes.  Like the clinic at The WHS, sterile equipment will be used and the sterile operating room will be 100% up to code and inspected and approved prior by the Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA). The facility is located in the Pet Centre which is held in a brand new, completely enclosed building that allows for a specific area to be closed-off as the hospital.

Q: What if something happens to one of the cats during surgery?

A: The WHS vets perform these routine, elective surgeries several times a day. All the animals at the LOVE Animal Hospital will be monitored in the same way they are monitored at The WHS and the likelihood of something out of the ordinary arising is slim. Medication and equipment will be available, as it is in The WHS clinic.

Q: Why is the LOVE Animal Hospital included in the Pet Centre at the Red River Ex?

A: We believe that the LOVE Animal Hospital is an excellent opportunity for visitors to the Ex to be educated about the importance of spaying and neutering their animals. It’s another way we are trying to bring awareness to the cat overpopulation crisis and help to reduce the amount of homeless animals in our city. The Red River Ex is dedicated to finding programming to ensure that its guests are informed about important community messages in safe, unique and informative ways.

Q: Is there a risk involved with these surgeries?

A: The surgeries being performed are elective. This means they are extremely low-risk procedures that are performed at The WHS, on average, 40 times a day. The animals at the LOVE Animal Hospital will be monitored in the same way they are monitored at The WHS clinic. In the unlikely event of an emergency, there will be medication and equipment available, as is at The WHS clinic.


]]>
Wed, 16 May 2012 11:47:43 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,246;The-LOVE-Animal-Hospital-at-the-Red-River-Exhibition- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,246;The-LOVE-Animal-Hospital-at-the-Red-River-Exhibition-

We believe that the LOVE Animal Hospital at the Red River Ex is a terrific opportunity to reach and educate people who wouldn’t otherwise be reached. Our objectives are to educate people in the importance of spaying and neutering their animals, with the ultimate goal of reducing the amount of homeless animals in our city. Guests of the Pet Centre will be encouraged to view the surgeries in the surgery suite, just like our WHS guests do on shelter tours.

It is important for The WHS to reassure our supporters that the cats who are going to be spayed, will receive the same fantastic care they would receive if the surgery was done at our WHS clinic. This means the cats will not be subjected to any higher levels of stress that could impact the surgery, and will have an enclosed room to recover in. The clinic will be inspected by the Manitoba Veterinarian Medical Association, and the new structure will be identical to those at The WHS.

FAQs Surrounding the LOVE Animal Hospital

Q: Will the cats that are having the surgery be more stressed because they are at the Ex?

A: The Pet Centre inside Discovery Place is located in a brand new, completely enclosed building that is set aside from the rest of the Ex. The surgery suite inside will be in its own, enclosed area and will provide a quiet, secluded area for cats to be brought into the facility and prepared for surgery. The volunteers who will be transporting the cats to and from The WHS will drive right up to the Pet Centre prior to the grounds opening, and will avoid the noise and activity of the Ex. The WHS staff and volunteers will be on hand throughout their care to ensure the safety and well-being of the cats.

Q: How will the clinic be set up?

A: The surgery suite at the Pet Centre will be almost identical to the clinic at The WHS. It will be an enclosed area inside the Pet Centre and will be up to the standards of any clinic. The surgeries will be performed in an enclosed room with windows so that viewers can see what the vets are doing. There will also be another quiet, enclosed room with no windows where the cats will await surgery and recover in a peaceful environment.  The surgery suite will be similar to the clinic at The WHS where people of all ages on tours and in day camps are encouraged to view the surgeries through the large windows.

Q: Will the surgeries be performed in a sterile environment?

A: Yes.  Like the clinic at The WHS, sterile equipment will be used and the sterile operating room will be 100% up to code and inspected and approved prior by the Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA). The facility is located in the Pet Centre which is held in a brand new, completely enclosed building that allows for a specific area to be closed-off as the hospital.

Q: What if something happens to one of the cats during surgery?

A: The WHS vets perform these routine, elective surgeries several times a day. All the animals at the LOVE Animal Hospital will be monitored in the same way they are monitored at The WHS and the likelihood of something out of the ordinary arising is slim. Medication and equipment will be available, as it is in The WHS clinic.

Q: Why is the LOVE Animal Hospital included in the Pet Centre at the Red River Ex?

A: We believe that the LOVE Animal Hospital is an excellent opportunity for visitors to the Ex to be educated about the importance of spaying and neutering their animals. It’s another way we are trying to bring awareness to the cat overpopulation crisis and help to reduce the amount of homeless animals in our city. The Red River Ex is dedicated to finding programming to ensure that its guests are informed about important community messages in safe, unique and informative ways.

Q: Is there a risk involved with these surgeries?

A: The surgeries being performed are elective. This means they are extremely low-risk procedures that are performed at The WHS, on average, 40 times a day. The animals at the LOVE Animal Hospital will be monitored in the same way they are monitored at The WHS clinic. In the unlikely event of an emergency, there will be medication and equipment available, as is at The WHS clinic.


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Spring Newsletter Gift Shop

On page 2 of the Spring Newsletter two prices of two Paws in Motion Gift Shop items were switched. The Collapsible Cup with Bottle Holder is $12.99, and the Travel Cup with Bottle Holder and Carabiner is $19.99. We apologize for any inconvenience!


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Wed, 16 May 2012 09:18:01 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,245;Spring-Newsletter-Gift-Shop- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,245;Spring-Newsletter-Gift-Shop-

On page 2 of the Spring Newsletter two prices of two Paws in Motion Gift Shop items were switched. The Collapsible Cup with Bottle Holder is $12.99, and the Travel Cup with Bottle Holder and Carabiner is $19.99. We apologize for any inconvenience!


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New Bylaw 31 Renders Ear Cropping Procedures Illegal

(WINNIPEG)- Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association has announced the creation of a new bylaw that will see ear cropping procedures performed on dogs as an illegal practice. The bylaw is supported by The Winnipeg Humane Society, which has a policy in place to oppose the injury of animals for cosmetic purposes.

"We feel this bylaw is a very progressive step in what has been a very inhumane practice," says Bill McDonald, CEO of The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The MVMA and The WHS concur there are no medical benefits to ear cropping and that the procedure opens a risk of infection, as the surgery requires full anaesthesia, and splits and tape post-surgery to hold the ears in the desired upright position.

Bylaw 31 states that as of February 3, 2012, it will be illegal for any Manitoba veterinarians to perform the surgical procedure on dogs. Breeds commonly subjected to having the procedure done include: Great Danes, Dobermans, Schnauzers, Boxers and Miniature Pinschers.

Other Canadian Provinces that have banned the practice include Newfoundland and Labrador, under the 1978 Animal Protection Act. Provincial Veterinary Medical Associations are looking closely at creating a similar bylaw, specifically in B.C. and Alberta.


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Thu, 16 Feb 2012 09:10:12 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,235;New-Bylaw-31-Renders-Ear-Cropping-Procedures-Illegal- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,235;New-Bylaw-31-Renders-Ear-Cropping-Procedures-Illegal-

(WINNIPEG)- Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association has announced the creation of a new bylaw that will see ear cropping procedures performed on dogs as an illegal practice. The bylaw is supported by The Winnipeg Humane Society, which has a policy in place to oppose the injury of animals for cosmetic purposes.

"We feel this bylaw is a very progressive step in what has been a very inhumane practice," says Bill McDonald, CEO of The Winnipeg Humane Society.

The MVMA and The WHS concur there are no medical benefits to ear cropping and that the procedure opens a risk of infection, as the surgery requires full anaesthesia, and splits and tape post-surgery to hold the ears in the desired upright position.

Bylaw 31 states that as of February 3, 2012, it will be illegal for any Manitoba veterinarians to perform the surgical procedure on dogs. Breeds commonly subjected to having the procedure done include: Great Danes, Dobermans, Schnauzers, Boxers and Miniature Pinschers.

Other Canadian Provinces that have banned the practice include Newfoundland and Labrador, under the 1978 Animal Protection Act. Provincial Veterinary Medical Associations are looking closely at creating a similar bylaw, specifically in B.C. and Alberta.


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Adopting a dog removed from the seizure

The WHS will have dogs available for adoption over the coming weeks.   Given the medical conditions we are treating, we are unable to inform you of how many will be available on a given day.  In an effort to adopt the dogs out as efficiently as possible, we ask potential adopters to do the following:

If you are interested in adopting a dog:

  1. You must complete an adoption survey as soon as possible: http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/files/adoption_forms/01-2011-Canine_Adoption_Form.pdf
  2. On your survey specify if you are interested in a:  1. Bulldog/Bulldog cross; 2. Wheaten;  3. Other (this includes Poodles, Poodle cross, Cavalier/Spaniel cross
  3. Once completed, please email the form to animaladoption@winnipeghumanesociety.ca or fax it to 982-3550
  4. Your completed and approved survey will be entered into a draw specific to the appropriate breed/cross (point 2).  Surveys will be randomly drawn.  You will have one business day to come meet the selected dog to see whether you would like to complete the adoption process. 
  5. Specifics on the dog will be made available at The WHS.  We are sorry, we cannot provide specifics prior to your visit.

Adoption fees:

$449 under 1 year of age

$349 over 1 year of age

Adoptions include: spay/neuter, first vaccinations, medical health check, 6 weeks of PetPlan Insurance.


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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 17:07:11 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,233;Adopting-a-dog-removed-from-the-seizure- http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,233;Adopting-a-dog-removed-from-the-seizure-

The WHS will have dogs available for adoption over the coming weeks.   Given the medical conditions we are treating, we are unable to inform you of how many will be available on a given day.  In an effort to adopt the dogs out as efficiently as possible, we ask potential adopters to do the following:

If you are interested in adopting a dog:

  1. You must complete an adoption survey as soon as possible: http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/files/adoption_forms/01-2011-Canine_Adoption_Form.pdf
  2. On your survey specify if you are interested in a:  1. Bulldog/Bulldog cross; 2. Wheaten;  3. Other (this includes Poodles, Poodle cross, Cavalier/Spaniel cross
  3. Once completed, please email the form to animaladoption@winnipeghumanesociety.ca or fax it to 982-3550
  4. Your completed and approved survey will be entered into a draw specific to the appropriate breed/cross (point 2).  Surveys will be randomly drawn.  You will have one business day to come meet the selected dog to see whether you would like to complete the adoption process. 
  5. Specifics on the dog will be made available at The WHS.  We are sorry, we cannot provide specifics prior to your visit.

Adoption fees:

$449 under 1 year of age

$349 over 1 year of age

Adoptions include: spay/neuter, first vaccinations, medical health check, 6 weeks of PetPlan Insurance.


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A Christmas Yarn That Gives All Year Round!

Colourfully patterned knitted blankets are piled upon a table in the Community Room at The Waverley, one of Winnipeg’s premiere retirement communities. And each Monday, a special group of ladies meet to share their stories, time and talent for a good cause.

“I used to knit a great deal, but I hadn’t stitched for about twenty years until I came here,” says Doris Birt, a member of the Waverley knitters. “I like knitting for the cats at the shelter. It’s a lot of fun.” Doris is one of seven amazing ladies who have knitted cat blankets for The Winnipeg Humane Society for years!

Marjorie Abbott is responsible for getting this talented and productive group of knitters organized. She’s been knitting cat blankets for The WHS since 2001.

“We were knitting baby blankets before,” says Marjorie, “but then a friend of mine suggested that I should knit cat blankets out of all the left over bits of yarn. We’ve been knitting cat blankets ever since, and we’ve even been to the shelter to visit the cats. It’s nice to see them all enjoying our handiwork.”

At 10 years, Marjorie holds the title of knitting cat blankets the longest of anyone in the group. “I always choose bright colours for the blankets because someone told me that cats like lots of colour,” she adds.

These wonderful ladies even pool their own money to buy yarn when their supply gets low. In the past, they’ve also accepted donations of yarn from The Waverley and The WHS. Over the years, their enthusiasm and charm has not been lost on all the grateful cats and staff at The WHS. Many a cat has curled up and taken a nap on Waverley-knitted blankets.

Bill McDonald, CEO of The Winnipeg Humane Society, and his dog, Cassidy, visited this special group of ladies on December 12, 2011, to say a special thank you.

Thank you Waverley knitters, and keep up the excellent work! For ten years you’ve helped keep our cats “purr-fectly” comfortable. We hope you’re all knitting cat blankets for many years to come!

photo credit: Jeremy Williamson


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Mon, 19 Dec 2011 16:01:12 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,223;A-Christmas-Yarn-That-Gives-All-Year-Round http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,223;A-Christmas-Yarn-That-Gives-All-Year-Round

Colourfully patterned knitted blankets are piled upon a table in the Community Room at The Waverley, one of Winnipeg’s premiere retirement communities. And each Monday, a special group of ladies meet to share their stories, time and talent for a good cause.

“I used to knit a great deal, but I hadn’t stitched for about twenty years until I came here,” says Doris Birt, a member of the Waverley knitters. “I like knitting for the cats at the shelter. It’s a lot of fun.” Doris is one of seven amazing ladies who have knitted cat blankets for The Winnipeg Humane Society for years!

Marjorie Abbott is responsible for getting this talented and productive group of knitters organized. She’s been knitting cat blankets for The WHS since 2001.

“We were knitting baby blankets before,” says Marjorie, “but then a friend of mine suggested that I should knit cat blankets out of all the left over bits of yarn. We’ve been knitting cat blankets ever since, and we’ve even been to the shelter to visit the cats. It’s nice to see them all enjoying our handiwork.”

At 10 years, Marjorie holds the title of knitting cat blankets the longest of anyone in the group. “I always choose bright colours for the blankets because someone told me that cats like lots of colour,” she adds.

These wonderful ladies even pool their own money to buy yarn when their supply gets low. In the past, they’ve also accepted donations of yarn from The Waverley and The WHS. Over the years, their enthusiasm and charm has not been lost on all the grateful cats and staff at The WHS. Many a cat has curled up and taken a nap on Waverley-knitted blankets.

Bill McDonald, CEO of The Winnipeg Humane Society, and his dog, Cassidy, visited this special group of ladies on December 12, 2011, to say a special thank you.

Thank you Waverley knitters, and keep up the excellent work! For ten years you’ve helped keep our cats “purr-fectly” comfortable. We hope you’re all knitting cat blankets for many years to come!

photo credit: Jeremy Williamson


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Canadian Tire Money

If you have any extra Canadian Tire money to donate, we know how to put it to good use.

Our Animal Protection Unit especially uses supplies from Canadian Tire and every little cent that we can save on costs helps.  If you're in the neighbourhood, please consider dropping some off!


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Fri, 02 Dec 2011 11:23:49 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,219;Canadian-Tire-Money http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,219;Canadian-Tire-Money

If you have any extra Canadian Tire money to donate, we know how to put it to good use.

Our Animal Protection Unit especially uses supplies from Canadian Tire and every little cent that we can save on costs helps.  If you're in the neighbourhood, please consider dropping some off!


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Winnipeg Jets Dog Sweaters

Don't kid yourself, you know your dog wants to become more of an integral part of your Winnipeg Jets parties.  Now, your canine companion can join the fun and look the part too!

Offical Winnipeg Jets dog sweaters are now available at The WHS Gift Shop.  Sizes range from XS-XXL and start at $33.99.

 

It sure looks good on Molly...but then again, Molly can make anything look cute!


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Thu, 01 Dec 2011 12:03:49 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,217;Winnipeg-Jets-Dog-Sweaters http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,217;Winnipeg-Jets-Dog-Sweaters

Don't kid yourself, you know your dog wants to become more of an integral part of your Winnipeg Jets parties.  Now, your canine companion can join the fun and look the part too!

Offical Winnipeg Jets dog sweaters are now available at The WHS Gift Shop.  Sizes range from XS-XXL and start at $33.99.

 

It sure looks good on Molly...but then again, Molly can make anything look cute!


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Free Press Article, Nov. 24

Re: Gordon Sinclair Article, November 24, 2011

As with most issues there are two sides to every story.  Gordon Sinclair’s article of November 24th provides only one side of the story.  This has put The Winnipeg Humane Society in a difficult position  as we cannot reveal the personal confidential details of how this dog came under our care due to the provincial Freedom of Information and Privacy Protection Act (FIPPA).  FIPPA prohibits The WHS from revealing the surrender circumstances in this case.  Therefore we feel that the attack upon Dr. Anseeuw is unjustified as Mr. Sinclair is not privy to all the facts of the surrender.

Bill McDonald

CEO


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Fri, 25 Nov 2011 11:01:55 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,214;Free-Press-Article-Nov-24 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,214;Free-Press-Article-Nov-24

Re: Gordon Sinclair Article, November 24, 2011

As with most issues there are two sides to every story.  Gordon Sinclair’s article of November 24th provides only one side of the story.  This has put The Winnipeg Humane Society in a difficult position  as we cannot reveal the personal confidential details of how this dog came under our care due to the provincial Freedom of Information and Privacy Protection Act (FIPPA).  FIPPA prohibits The WHS from revealing the surrender circumstances in this case.  Therefore we feel that the attack upon Dr. Anseeuw is unjustified as Mr. Sinclair is not privy to all the facts of the surrender.

Bill McDonald

CEO


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K9 Unit Pups Visit WHS

The K9 Unit puppies paid The WHS a visit yesterday, but it wasn’t a social call!  The Winnipeg Humane Society’s Director of Animal Health, Dr. Erika Anseeuw, regularly provides medical exams and vaccinations to the soon-to-be police dogs.  These six week old Belgian Malinois pups were due for their vaccinations and check-ups and are seen here with Constable Papetti who helped bring 11 puppies to the shelter.  Not all 11 puppies will graduate into training however.  The Winnipeg Police Service first needs to get to know each puppy before deciding which ones will be ideal for the work of a police dog.  The partnership between Winnipeg Police Services and The Winnipeg Humane Society is ongoing and we look forward to watching these puppies grow and begin their official training several months down the line.


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Wed, 12 Oct 2011 10:36:49 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,203;K9-Unit-Pups-Visit-WHS http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,203;K9-Unit-Pups-Visit-WHS

The K9 Unit puppies paid The WHS a visit yesterday, but it wasn’t a social call!  The Winnipeg Humane Society’s Director of Animal Health, Dr. Erika Anseeuw, regularly provides medical exams and vaccinations to the soon-to-be police dogs.  These six week old Belgian Malinois pups were due for their vaccinations and check-ups and are seen here with Constable Papetti who helped bring 11 puppies to the shelter.  Not all 11 puppies will graduate into training however.  The Winnipeg Police Service first needs to get to know each puppy before deciding which ones will be ideal for the work of a police dog.  The partnership between Winnipeg Police Services and The Winnipeg Humane Society is ongoing and we look forward to watching these puppies grow and begin their official training several months down the line.


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WHS Pet Loss Support Counsellor Awarded

(WINNIPEG) – Anne Mulders Papadopoulos, Winnipeg Humane Society Pet Loss Support Counsellor, was honoured by the Canadian Mental Health Association for her significant contribution to the mental health field through volunteer efforts.

The Heroes of Mental Health Award was presented to Anne at a luncheon last Friday at the Manitoba Club.  She was recognized as a volunteer who has made a significant contribution to the mental health field. 

“Volunteering through The WHS provides me with the opportunity to help people through one of life's most difficult experiences,” said Papadopoulos, “It is an honour to be able to share this journey and I am humbly grateful.”

For the past three years, Anne has been instrumental in the daily operation of The WHS’s pet loss support services including monitoring a pet loss support hotline, leading pet loss support group sessions and implementing an annual candlelight pet vigil.

In total, 18 other individuals and organizations were awarded under a series of seven categories.


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Thu, 06 Oct 2011 10:23:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,200;WHS-Pet-Loss-Support-Counsellor-Awarded http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,200;WHS-Pet-Loss-Support-Counsellor-Awarded

(WINNIPEG) – Anne Mulders Papadopoulos, Winnipeg Humane Society Pet Loss Support Counsellor, was honoured by the Canadian Mental Health Association for her significant contribution to the mental health field through volunteer efforts.

The Heroes of Mental Health Award was presented to Anne at a luncheon last Friday at the Manitoba Club.  She was recognized as a volunteer who has made a significant contribution to the mental health field. 

“Volunteering through The WHS provides me with the opportunity to help people through one of life's most difficult experiences,” said Papadopoulos, “It is an honour to be able to share this journey and I am humbly grateful.”

For the past three years, Anne has been instrumental in the daily operation of The WHS’s pet loss support services including monitoring a pet loss support hotline, leading pet loss support group sessions and implementing an annual candlelight pet vigil.

In total, 18 other individuals and organizations were awarded under a series of seven categories.


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Barn Buddies

The Barn Buddies program gives cats previously considered unadoptable due to behavioural issues the opportunity to live in a select rural farm, barn or shop situations.  While, The WHS does not advocate for allowing cats outdoors, this program will save the lives of many cats who have no other options.

Before adoption, The WHS will spay or neuter, health check and vaccinate all Barn Buddy cats. The cats will also be given a tattoo and be deemed non-aggressive.

Eligible Cats

  • May have severe litter box/house soiling issues
  • Have a behavioural issue that prevents the cat from living indoors with a family
  • Must be social to a degree and easy to catch
  • Must be spayed/neutered (The WHS will perform the surgery)
  • Must test clear of medical concerns that would be a problem for the barn or shop
  • De-clawed cats are not eligible for Barn Buddies

Eligible Barns or Shops

  • Adopters must be able to pick up their new Barn Buddy cat within 24 hours of being contacted.
  • Cats must have shelter available in a barn, building or stable
  • Daily food and water must be provided
  • Owner must agree to long-term veterinary care, if needed and as required
  • The farm or shop must have a secure place to keep the cats indoors during their first 2-3 weeks “on the job” while they acclimate to their new surroundings.
  • Eligible barns/shops must be located outside Winnipeg.

Donations are greatly appreciated, however Barn Buddies cats are available at no-cost.

Register for Barn Buddies

To register for the Barn Buddies program, or for more information, please call (204) 982-2032 or email us.

Click here to download the Barn Buddies Application Form.


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Tue, 05 Jul 2011 15:06:29 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,175;Barn-Buddies http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,175;Barn-Buddies

The Barn Buddies program gives cats previously considered unadoptable due to behavioural issues the opportunity to live in a select rural farm, barn or shop situations.  While, The WHS does not advocate for allowing cats outdoors, this program will save the lives of many cats who have no other options.

Before adoption, The WHS will spay or neuter, health check and vaccinate all Barn Buddy cats. The cats will also be given a tattoo and be deemed non-aggressive.

Eligible Cats

  • May have severe litter box/house soiling issues
  • Have a behavioural issue that prevents the cat from living indoors with a family
  • Must be social to a degree and easy to catch
  • Must be spayed/neutered (The WHS will perform the surgery)
  • Must test clear of medical concerns that would be a problem for the barn or shop
  • De-clawed cats are not eligible for Barn Buddies

Eligible Barns or Shops

  • Adopters must be able to pick up their new Barn Buddy cat within 24 hours of being contacted.
  • Cats must have shelter available in a barn, building or stable
  • Daily food and water must be provided
  • Owner must agree to long-term veterinary care, if needed and as required
  • The farm or shop must have a secure place to keep the cats indoors during their first 2-3 weeks “on the job” while they acclimate to their new surroundings.
  • Eligible barns/shops must be located outside Winnipeg.

Donations are greatly appreciated, however Barn Buddies cats are available at no-cost.

Register for Barn Buddies

To register for the Barn Buddies program, or for more information, please call (204) 982-2032 or email us.

Click here to download the Barn Buddies Application Form.


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Fun Spay/Neuter Video

This video was done by the very talented Jeremy Williams.  It puts a fun spin on the important subject of spaying and neutering your pets.

Please share it with who ever you can.  If more people spayed/neutered their pets, fewer pets would be turned over to animal shelters all over the world.


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Wed, 01 Jun 2011 13:52:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,164;Fun-Spay-Neuter-Video http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,164;Fun-Spay-Neuter-Video

This video was done by the very talented Jeremy Williams.  It puts a fun spin on the important subject of spaying and neutering your pets.

Please share it with who ever you can.  If more people spayed/neutered their pets, fewer pets would be turned over to animal shelters all over the world.


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Strays: Winnipeg's Cat Problem

If you have ever wondered about Winnipeg's stray cat population, take a look at this video.  Produced by a journalism student, Strays: Winnipeg's Cat Problem, very clearly explains exactly why there is such a problem in Winnipeg, what measures are being taken to help, and what needs to be done in the future.


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Tue, 05 Apr 2011 15:52:17 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,145;Strays-Winnipegs-Cat-Problem http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,145;Strays-Winnipegs-Cat-Problem

If you have ever wondered about Winnipeg's stray cat population, take a look at this video.  Produced by a journalism student, Strays: Winnipeg's Cat Problem, very clearly explains exactly why there is such a problem in Winnipeg, what measures are being taken to help, and what needs to be done in the future.


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Support Winnipeg's Furriest Heros

Support the Winnipeg Police K9 Unit's quest for new kennels by visiting their facebook page and becoming a fan.  Just click "like" at the top of their page and they'll be one step closer to a place they can call home.

City council will be voting in December on a new kennel for these furry heros!

Read CTV Winnipeg's story on this here.


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Mon, 22 Nov 2010 10:39:48 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,109;Support-Winnipegs-Furriest-Heros http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,109;Support-Winnipegs-Furriest-Heros

Support the Winnipeg Police K9 Unit's quest for new kennels by visiting their facebook page and becoming a fan.  Just click "like" at the top of their page and they'll be one step closer to a place they can call home.

City council will be voting in December on a new kennel for these furry heros!

Read CTV Winnipeg's story on this here.


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Winter Weather Safety

When the temperature drops and the snow begins to fall, you start to prepare for the coming winter by getting winter coats, boots and gloves ready for use. Remember that at this time of year, your pet also needs extra attention from you!

There is a common misconception that dogs are "fine" when left outside in the cold. This is absolutely not true! Regardless of the breed, or the type of coat a dog may have, all pets need suitable shelter from the elements and insulation against cold weather.

Pets should not be left outside for long periods in freezing weather. In fact, during periods of extreme wind chill, pets should only be out for a couple moments to relieve themselves. Like us, our pets can suffer from hypothermia and frostbite. Particularly at risk are young and the senior pets.

Dogs and cats are not immune to cold weather. If it’s cold for you, it’s cold for them!

  • Monitor your pets at all times when they are outdoors in below freezing weather. This is especially important for animals who are kept indoors most of the time who will not have adapted to the cold weather by growing thicker coats or toughening up their paw pads.
  • Your pet’s ears and paws are especially susceptible to frostbite in the winter. Frostbite requires immediate medical attention from a veterinarian. 
  • Sweaters or jackets are important to short-coated dogs when they are being walked or go outdoors to relieve themselves in cold weather.  Boots are also a good idea, just make sure you allow your pet some time to get used to them.
  • Take shorter walks if it is severely cold. Some small breed, short-coated dogs like Chihuahuas or Miniature Pinchers should not even be walked outdoors in the extreme cold.
  • Never let your dog off leash during a snowstorm. They can loose their scent and become disoriented or lost.
  • An outdoor dog needs a dry, elevated, insulated doghouse with clean, dry bedding and a flap over the door to keep the wind out. Consider adding a dog door to the garage with a soft cushion in the warmest corner.
  • A bowl of frozen water can’t help a thirsty pet! Check outdoor water bowls often when it’s below freezing and break the ice or refill with water as necessary. Consider buying a heated dog bowl.
  • Outdoor pets need more calories in the winter to produce body heat, so increase the amount you feed your pet. On the other hand, indoor pets may get less exercise in the cold months and may need fewer calories to avoid weight gain.
  • Chemicals used to melt snow on sidewalks can irritate pets’ paws, so you may need to wipe them with a wet cloth after an outing. Don’t forget their belly either, if they have been lounging on a salted surface.
  • To prevent ice from sticking in-between your dog’s pads, trim any long fur around his or her paws and rub some Vaseline or oil on them.
  • Just a teaspoon of antifreeze can be deadly to a dog or cat. Roaming animals are more likely to accidentally consume unattended antifreeze and kidney failure can set in within 24 hours. The most likely source of this poison is radiator drainage spots in garages (yours included!) or parking pads. These spots should be flushed with water immediately.
  • Cats should never be allowed to roam outside - in fact it is illegal in most cities. However if outdoors in extreme cold, a cat may crawl up under your car seeking shelter & warmth near the engine. The cat may get caught in the fan and be seriously injured when the engine starts. Open the hood of your car or slap the hood of your car noisily with your hand before you start the car to startle any sleeping animal there.
  • Don’t leave your pets alone in a vehicle in the cold.
  • Cold, damp weather can aggravate your pet’s arthritis so be extra careful with dogs that suffer from this condition in the winter.
  • Christmas brings all sorts of shiny, dangly decorations; check your house to ensure there is nothing your cat or dog can get into. Tinsel is of a particular concern as cats have been known to ingest it and require surgery.
  • Chocolate is poisonous to pets! Do not allow them any access to chocolate during the holidays or at any other time. Also, keep holiday plants that are poisonous to your pet out of your home - these include poinsettias, holly, mistletoe and Christmas cactuses.


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Fri, 19 Nov 2010 11:47:18 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,108;Winter-Weather-Safety http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,108;Winter-Weather-Safety

When the temperature drops and the snow begins to fall, you start to prepare for the coming winter by getting winter coats, boots and gloves ready for use. Remember that at this time of year, your pet also needs extra attention from you!

There is a common misconception that dogs are "fine" when left outside in the cold. This is absolutely not true! Regardless of the breed, or the type of coat a dog may have, all pets need suitable shelter from the elements and insulation against cold weather.

Pets should not be left outside for long periods in freezing weather. In fact, during periods of extreme wind chill, pets should only be out for a couple moments to relieve themselves. Like us, our pets can suffer from hypothermia and frostbite. Particularly at risk are young and the senior pets.

Dogs and cats are not immune to cold weather. If it’s cold for you, it’s cold for them!

  • Monitor your pets at all times when they are outdoors in below freezing weather. This is especially important for animals who are kept indoors most of the time who will not have adapted to the cold weather by growing thicker coats or toughening up their paw pads.
  • Your pet’s ears and paws are especially susceptible to frostbite in the winter. Frostbite requires immediate medical attention from a veterinarian. 
  • Sweaters or jackets are important to short-coated dogs when they are being walked or go outdoors to relieve themselves in cold weather.  Boots are also a good idea, just make sure you allow your pet some time to get used to them.
  • Take shorter walks if it is severely cold. Some small breed, short-coated dogs like Chihuahuas or Miniature Pinchers should not even be walked outdoors in the extreme cold.
  • Never let your dog off leash during a snowstorm. They can loose their scent and become disoriented or lost.
  • An outdoor dog needs a dry, elevated, insulated doghouse with clean, dry bedding and a flap over the door to keep the wind out. Consider adding a dog door to the garage with a soft cushion in the warmest corner.
  • A bowl of frozen water can’t help a thirsty pet! Check outdoor water bowls often when it’s below freezing and break the ice or refill with water as necessary. Consider buying a heated dog bowl.
  • Outdoor pets need more calories in the winter to produce body heat, so increase the amount you feed your pet. On the other hand, indoor pets may get less exercise in the cold months and may need fewer calories to avoid weight gain.
  • Chemicals used to melt snow on sidewalks can irritate pets’ paws, so you may need to wipe them with a wet cloth after an outing. Don’t forget their belly either, if they have been lounging on a salted surface.
  • To prevent ice from sticking in-between your dog’s pads, trim any long fur around his or her paws and rub some Vaseline or oil on them.
  • Just a teaspoon of antifreeze can be deadly to a dog or cat. Roaming animals are more likely to accidentally consume unattended antifreeze and kidney failure can set in within 24 hours. The most likely source of this poison is radiator drainage spots in garages (yours included!) or parking pads. These spots should be flushed with water immediately.
  • Cats should never be allowed to roam outside - in fact it is illegal in most cities. However if outdoors in extreme cold, a cat may crawl up under your car seeking shelter & warmth near the engine. The cat may get caught in the fan and be seriously injured when the engine starts. Open the hood of your car or slap the hood of your car noisily with your hand before you start the car to startle any sleeping animal there.
  • Don’t leave your pets alone in a vehicle in the cold.
  • Cold, damp weather can aggravate your pet’s arthritis so be extra careful with dogs that suffer from this condition in the winter.
  • Christmas brings all sorts of shiny, dangly decorations; check your house to ensure there is nothing your cat or dog can get into. Tinsel is of a particular concern as cats have been known to ingest it and require surgery.
  • Chocolate is poisonous to pets! Do not allow them any access to chocolate during the holidays or at any other time. Also, keep holiday plants that are poisonous to your pet out of your home - these include poinsettias, holly, mistletoe and Christmas cactuses.


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Major Supermarket Bans Sow Stalls

From the Manitoba Co-operator, November 18, 2010:

Canada's pork producers are scrambling to learn more about a major Australian Grocery chain's decision to ban pork from countries that use sow gestation crates.

Coles Supermarkets said last week all its imported pork products, including processed ham and bacon, will have to be from pigs raised without the use of sow stalls.

Read the whole story here (pdf).


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Fri, 19 Nov 2010 11:19:07 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,107;Major-Supermarket-Bans-Sow-Stalls http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,107;Major-Supermarket-Bans-Sow-Stalls

From the Manitoba Co-operator, November 18, 2010:

Canada's pork producers are scrambling to learn more about a major Australian Grocery chain's decision to ban pork from countries that use sow gestation crates.

Coles Supermarkets said last week all its imported pork products, including processed ham and bacon, will have to be from pigs raised without the use of sow stalls.

Read the whole story here (pdf).


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New CTV Pet Ed - DNA KIts

On the last Friday of each month, CTV features The Winnipeg Humane Society in their monthly Pet Ed wtih Susan Tymofichuk.

View this month's editorial on dog DNA testing, by clicking here.

The Pet Eds cover tips and tricks that will keep your fine furry and feathered friends healthy, safe and happy.

Watch videos from past editorials by visiting www.winnipeg.ctv.ca/community and clicking on the Pet Ed box down the right column of the page.  You can then select which Pet Ed to view by clicking on one of the titles under the video player.


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Mon, 01 Nov 2010 12:37:05 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,101;New-CTV-Pet-Ed-DNA-KIts http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,101;New-CTV-Pet-Ed-DNA-KIts

On the last Friday of each month, CTV features The Winnipeg Humane Society in their monthly Pet Ed wtih Susan Tymofichuk.

View this month's editorial on dog DNA testing, by clicking here.

The Pet Eds cover tips and tricks that will keep your fine furry and feathered friends healthy, safe and happy.

Watch videos from past editorials by visiting www.winnipeg.ctv.ca/community and clicking on the Pet Ed box down the right column of the page.  You can then select which Pet Ed to view by clicking on one of the titles under the video player.


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An Update from Dogtown

NEWEST UPDATE: NEWEST UPDATE: All seven of the dogshave been approved for adoption at Dogtown!  We wish them all the best and hope they all find their new forever homes soon!

Dogtown, a National Geographic television show and dog rehabilitation centre has agreed to take seven dogs seized from a terrible hoarding situation in Gull Lake, MB (scroll to the bottom for background).  The dogs were the seven who were in the worst condition and would be needing several months of rehabilitation.

Here is our latest update from Dogtown on the dogs:

Zoraster (was Oliver) - Is doing really good. He is still uncertain of new people in his run, but is going out for walks with a lot of volunteers and does well. He lives with four other dogs, 2 of which are blind. He has not been too playful yet, but seems to be getting more comfortable every day. He really loves his caregivers and all the attention they give him. Right now they are working on his basic training.

 Hammond - Started showing some undesirable behavior while he was living at one of our more high traffic areas. It is possible that all the people and excitement was too much for him. We moved him to an area that has less activity and that has made a huge difference. We have found that he was acting out because he wanted more one on one attention. He now lives with 3 other dogs and is going out with volunteers. He gets very excited to go for walks and to play fetch. He is also learning his basic training.

The other 5 Emory (was Missy), Catalina (was Annie), Tinder (was Spirit), Winter (was Rose), and Vera (was Viv) - Are all living together and doing really good! Vera has found her voice and barks for attention. Tinder has found a new friend in her neighbor and they get to go out for play dates. Emory continues to be a sweet and social butterfly, who greets all the visitors with a tail wag. Catalina has also started to enjoy attention. Winter loves to be around people, and follow them around her run. She still is not a fan of being touched, but is learning to tolerate it when she has too. They all go out with volunteers and do great with them.

 All 7 are coming out of their shell and developing their own personality, it is such a joy to watch them grow.

You can read a previous update by visiting the Best Friends website.

The Gull Lake Dogs

On July 16 and 17, 2010 we took part in one of the worst dog seizures many people have ever experienced.  Sixty-four dogs were seized by the Province of Manitoba from a private property in the Gull Lake area.  Our team of Winnipeg Humane Society staff could never have prepared themselves for what they saw when the dogs arrived at the shelter.  The dogs were covered in feces, dirt and garbage; many had open wounds and/or serious medical conditions; they were unsocialzed, terrified and several of them, mentally shut down.

Everyone worked well into the night on Friday and tirelessly on Saturday, bringing the dogs into the building one by one.  The condition of each dog was photographed before they were examined and vaccinated by a team of veterinarians.  We did whatever we could to make the dogs feel as comfortable as possible—we bathed overheated dogs in cool water, we gently helped them walk by tucking towels under their legs, we cleaned their wounds and treated any pressing medical concerns, and we gave them a safe and quiet place to rest.

For two weeks The Winnipeg Humane Society acted as a housing and care facility for the dogs while the legalities of the seizure were worked out by the Province.  Staff fed, bathed (often shaved) and cared for the dogs until the province was able to officially turn some of the dogs over to us.

Twenty-five of the dogs were turned over to us and we are happy to announce that, other than seven of them who were transferred to Dogtown, they have all happily found their forever homes.


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Wed, 13 Oct 2010 09:55:59 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,96;An-Update-from-Dogtown http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,96;An-Update-from-Dogtown

NEWEST UPDATE: NEWEST UPDATE: All seven of the dogshave been approved for adoption at Dogtown!  We wish them all the best and hope they all find their new forever homes soon!

Dogtown, a National Geographic television show and dog rehabilitation centre has agreed to take seven dogs seized from a terrible hoarding situation in Gull Lake, MB (scroll to the bottom for background).  The dogs were the seven who were in the worst condition and would be needing several months of rehabilitation.

Here is our latest update from Dogtown on the dogs:

Zoraster (was Oliver) - Is doing really good. He is still uncertain of new people in his run, but is going out for walks with a lot of volunteers and does well. He lives with four other dogs, 2 of which are blind. He has not been too playful yet, but seems to be getting more comfortable every day. He really loves his caregivers and all the attention they give him. Right now they are working on his basic training.

 Hammond - Started showing some undesirable behavior while he was living at one of our more high traffic areas. It is possible that all the people and excitement was too much for him. We moved him to an area that has less activity and that has made a huge difference. We have found that he was acting out because he wanted more one on one attention. He now lives with 3 other dogs and is going out with volunteers. He gets very excited to go for walks and to play fetch. He is also learning his basic training.

The other 5 Emory (was Missy), Catalina (was Annie), Tinder (was Spirit), Winter (was Rose), and Vera (was Viv) - Are all living together and doing really good! Vera has found her voice and barks for attention. Tinder has found a new friend in her neighbor and they get to go out for play dates. Emory continues to be a sweet and social butterfly, who greets all the visitors with a tail wag. Catalina has also started to enjoy attention. Winter loves to be around people, and follow them around her run. She still is not a fan of being touched, but is learning to tolerate it when she has too. They all go out with volunteers and do great with them.

 All 7 are coming out of their shell and developing their own personality, it is such a joy to watch them grow.

You can read a previous update by visiting the Best Friends website.

The Gull Lake Dogs

On July 16 and 17, 2010 we took part in one of the worst dog seizures many people have ever experienced.  Sixty-four dogs were seized by the Province of Manitoba from a private property in the Gull Lake area.  Our team of Winnipeg Humane Society staff could never have prepared themselves for what they saw when the dogs arrived at the shelter.  The dogs were covered in feces, dirt and garbage; many had open wounds and/or serious medical conditions; they were unsocialzed, terrified and several of them, mentally shut down.

Everyone worked well into the night on Friday and tirelessly on Saturday, bringing the dogs into the building one by one.  The condition of each dog was photographed before they were examined and vaccinated by a team of veterinarians.  We did whatever we could to make the dogs feel as comfortable as possible—we bathed overheated dogs in cool water, we gently helped them walk by tucking towels under their legs, we cleaned their wounds and treated any pressing medical concerns, and we gave them a safe and quiet place to rest.

For two weeks The Winnipeg Humane Society acted as a housing and care facility for the dogs while the legalities of the seizure were worked out by the Province.  Staff fed, bathed (often shaved) and cared for the dogs until the province was able to officially turn some of the dogs over to us.

Twenty-five of the dogs were turned over to us and we are happy to announce that, other than seven of them who were transferred to Dogtown, they have all happily found their forever homes.


]]>
Diseases and Parasites

Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?
Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is carried and spread by the deer tick. The bacterium is found in mice, deer, and other wildlife. When a tick feeds on an infected animal, the tick transfers the bacteria to the next animal it feeds on. This disease can affect your pets, as well as you; however, you can only catch the disease if you’re bitten by the tick itself, NOT by contact with your pet.

Lyme disease is found in Canada, and the highest incidences occur in North West Ontario along the Manitoban border, however, it can also be found in British Columbia, Quebec, and New Brunswick.

How do I know if my dog has Lyme disease?
The most common symptom of Lyme disease infection in dogs is arthritis, which causes inflammation, pain in joints and lameness. Other signs can also be dehydration, loss of appetite and weight, inactivity and swollen lymph nodes. Signs of the disease usually develop 2-5 months after the infection, with the period of lameness lasting for 3-4 days.

Most dogs exposed to the Lyme bacterium, do not get ill. Also, some dogs require treatment, however, many infections resolve on their own.
    
Diagnosis is made by a blood test that detects exposure to the bacterium in conjunction with symptoms. The test will also identify a dog that was exposed to the bacterium but did not become ill; therefore, interpretation of a positive result is important.

How can I protect my dog?
  • Prevention - Early removal of ticks by carefully inspecting your dog’s ears, tail area, elbows and between toes. This should be done daily, as it takes the tick about 48 hours to infect your dog.
  • Tick control - Use tick repellant sprays weekly, and apply them before going into tick infested areas.
  • Vaccination – This is also available, but has a high rate of side effects.

Heartworms

What are Heartworms?
Heartworms are blood parasites that pose a dangerous and even fatal condition to your dog. Immature heartworms are spread by mosquitoes and are passed along into the bloodstream of the dog. They travel to the right side of the heart where they can grow and reproduce, resulting in blockage of the arteries. Adult heartworms can grow to the length of 15-30cm, and in severe cases, a dog can be infested with hundreds of them.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of heartworm disease depend on how many worms the dog carries, and how long they have been carried. Unfortunately, most symptoms are detectable only after much damage has been done to the internal organs, which can be irreversible.
   
Signs include intolerance to exercise, chronic cough, listlessness, labored breathing, weight loss, fainting, chest bulging, and abnormal heart and lung sounds. Worms in the heart decrease the amount of oxygen rich blood, and increase the work load, causing liver and kidney problems, and heart failure.

What are the treatment options for this disease?
Preventing heartworm disease is easy! There are monthly medications that are available at your local vet. The heart worm prevention program in Manitoba starts on June 1st- Nov 1st. Every dog should be on heartworm prevention. 

How can I protect my dog?
Since Southern Manitoba is one of the areas in Canada that is endemic, and the disease is transmissible in warmer seasons, protecting your dog from heartworms is important. Once-a-month tablets are available to prevent the growth of heartworms into adult ones, as well as solutions that can be applied directly to the skin in mosquito season.

Blastomycosis

What is Blastomycosis?
Blastomycosis is a fungal infection caused by a fungus, which grows as a mould in moist, warm, acid and sandy soils. Dogs often get the infection after inhaling in the spores from the soil and into their lungs, but can also occur through contact with exposed skin (e.g. wounds).
   
This fungus is found in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, as well as Quebec, and can be fatal if untreated. Once the fungus is in the body, it multiplies rapidly and can spread from the lungs where it creates a pulmonary lung infection, to other parts of the body such as eyes, bones, brain and urogenital system

What are the symptoms of Blastomycosis?
Signs can include:
  • Respiratory tract problems such as difficulty in breathing and harsh lung sounds
  • Coughing
  • Exercise intolerance 
  • Anorexia and weight loss
  • Depression and lameness
  • Fever that does not respond to antibiotics ( 103 degrees or higher)
  • Eye problems such as redness, pain, swelling, excessive tearing, clouding of the cornea, and in extreme cases, blindness.
  • Blood in urine
  • Draining skin lesions and forming ulcers on skin
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
To diagnose Blastomycosis, a sample is taken from the infected tissue. A chest x-ray can also be taken for respiratory disease.

What are the treatment options for Blastomycosis?
It can take weeks or even months for any signs of Blastomycosis to appear, but sometimes, the dog’s immune system can fight off the infection if relatively small amounts were inhaled. However, if the dog is not able to fight of the fungal infection, oral antifungal drugs are available.
    
How Can I protect my dog?
Unfortunately, there is no other way to protect your pet other than to avoid the areas with high Blastomycosis population. If you are out for the weekend in your cottage, ensure that your dog is not digging beneath the cottage or in wet, damp, moldy areas such as beneath rocks that are close to the water. Be aware of the symptoms, and take immediate actions if you think that your dog may have Blastomycosis.


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Mon, 26 Jul 2010 14:51:52 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,79;Diseases-and-Parasites http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,79;Diseases-and-Parasites

Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?
Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that is carried and spread by the deer tick. The bacterium is found in mice, deer, and other wildlife. When a tick feeds on an infected animal, the tick transfers the bacteria to the next animal it feeds on. This disease can affect your pets, as well as you; however, you can only catch the disease if you’re bitten by the tick itself, NOT by contact with your pet.

Lyme disease is found in Canada, and the highest incidences occur in North West Ontario along the Manitoban border, however, it can also be found in British Columbia, Quebec, and New Brunswick.

How do I know if my dog has Lyme disease?
The most common symptom of Lyme disease infection in dogs is arthritis, which causes inflammation, pain in joints and lameness. Other signs can also be dehydration, loss of appetite and weight, inactivity and swollen lymph nodes. Signs of the disease usually develop 2-5 months after the infection, with the period of lameness lasting for 3-4 days.

Most dogs exposed to the Lyme bacterium, do not get ill. Also, some dogs require treatment, however, many infections resolve on their own.
    
Diagnosis is made by a blood test that detects exposure to the bacterium in conjunction with symptoms. The test will also identify a dog that was exposed to the bacterium but did not become ill; therefore, interpretation of a positive result is important.

How can I protect my dog?
  • Prevention - Early removal of ticks by carefully inspecting your dog’s ears, tail area, elbows and between toes. This should be done daily, as it takes the tick about 48 hours to infect your dog.
  • Tick control - Use tick repellant sprays weekly, and apply them before going into tick infested areas.
  • Vaccination – This is also available, but has a high rate of side effects.

Heartworms

What are Heartworms?
Heartworms are blood parasites that pose a dangerous and even fatal condition to your dog. Immature heartworms are spread by mosquitoes and are passed along into the bloodstream of the dog. They travel to the right side of the heart where they can grow and reproduce, resulting in blockage of the arteries. Adult heartworms can grow to the length of 15-30cm, and in severe cases, a dog can be infested with hundreds of them.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of heartworm disease depend on how many worms the dog carries, and how long they have been carried. Unfortunately, most symptoms are detectable only after much damage has been done to the internal organs, which can be irreversible.
   
Signs include intolerance to exercise, chronic cough, listlessness, labored breathing, weight loss, fainting, chest bulging, and abnormal heart and lung sounds. Worms in the heart decrease the amount of oxygen rich blood, and increase the work load, causing liver and kidney problems, and heart failure.

What are the treatment options for this disease?
Preventing heartworm disease is easy! There are monthly medications that are available at your local vet. The heart worm prevention program in Manitoba starts on June 1st- Nov 1st. Every dog should be on heartworm prevention. 

How can I protect my dog?
Since Southern Manitoba is one of the areas in Canada that is endemic, and the disease is transmissible in warmer seasons, protecting your dog from heartworms is important. Once-a-month tablets are available to prevent the growth of heartworms into adult ones, as well as solutions that can be applied directly to the skin in mosquito season.

Blastomycosis

What is Blastomycosis?
Blastomycosis is a fungal infection caused by a fungus, which grows as a mould in moist, warm, acid and sandy soils. Dogs often get the infection after inhaling in the spores from the soil and into their lungs, but can also occur through contact with exposed skin (e.g. wounds).
   
This fungus is found in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, as well as Quebec, and can be fatal if untreated. Once the fungus is in the body, it multiplies rapidly and can spread from the lungs where it creates a pulmonary lung infection, to other parts of the body such as eyes, bones, brain and urogenital system

What are the symptoms of Blastomycosis?
Signs can include:
  • Respiratory tract problems such as difficulty in breathing and harsh lung sounds
  • Coughing
  • Exercise intolerance 
  • Anorexia and weight loss
  • Depression and lameness
  • Fever that does not respond to antibiotics ( 103 degrees or higher)
  • Eye problems such as redness, pain, swelling, excessive tearing, clouding of the cornea, and in extreme cases, blindness.
  • Blood in urine
  • Draining skin lesions and forming ulcers on skin
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
To diagnose Blastomycosis, a sample is taken from the infected tissue. A chest x-ray can also be taken for respiratory disease.

What are the treatment options for Blastomycosis?
It can take weeks or even months for any signs of Blastomycosis to appear, but sometimes, the dog’s immune system can fight off the infection if relatively small amounts were inhaled. However, if the dog is not able to fight of the fungal infection, oral antifungal drugs are available.
    
How Can I protect my dog?
Unfortunately, there is no other way to protect your pet other than to avoid the areas with high Blastomycosis population. If you are out for the weekend in your cottage, ensure that your dog is not digging beneath the cottage or in wet, damp, moldy areas such as beneath rocks that are close to the water. Be aware of the symptoms, and take immediate actions if you think that your dog may have Blastomycosis.


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Pet Travel Safety

Pets in Vehicles

Your dog or cat may not like following the rules, but pets can’t help obeying the laws of physics. In the case of a crash, your pet can be prone to deadly injuries, so keep them as car-safe as every other member of the family. Here are some tips to help you:
  • Only humans in the front seat – It is very important that you keep your dog out of the front seat. The impact of the airbags in case of an accident can be fatal.
  • Buckle up your best friend - Restraints are important. An unrestrained dog can interfere with driving. Invest in a doggie seat belt harness, (available at The WHS Gift Shop) a pet travel crate, or a cat/dog cargo barrier.
  • Role up those windows - Your dog’s head should be kept inside at all times. Dogs are at risk of suffering from eye infections and allergic reactions from airborne irritants or suffering injuries from flying debris or rocks.
  • Never leave pets unattended - On hot summer days, cars can heat up very quickly to dangerous temperatures, even with the windows down.
  • Back of pickup trucks - Unrestrained dogs in the backs of pickup trucks can be dangerous. Pickup harnesses are available. *In Manitoba, it is illegal to travel with an unrestrained dog in the back of an open pickup truck.
  • Take a break - For longer car rides, give yourself and your pet a few rest stops every two or three hours.
  • Use barriers - These useful items allow you to drive without having your pet distract you and will keep them from chewing on upholstery, sunglasses or groceries.


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Mon, 26 Jul 2010 14:46:57 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,78;Pet-Travel-Safety http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,78;Pet-Travel-Safety

Pets in Vehicles

Your dog or cat may not like following the rules, but pets can’t help obeying the laws of physics. In the case of a crash, your pet can be prone to deadly injuries, so keep them as car-safe as every other member of the family. Here are some tips to help you:
  • Only humans in the front seat – It is very important that you keep your dog out of the front seat. The impact of the airbags in case of an accident can be fatal.
  • Buckle up your best friend - Restraints are important. An unrestrained dog can interfere with driving. Invest in a doggie seat belt harness, (available at The WHS Gift Shop) a pet travel crate, or a cat/dog cargo barrier.
  • Role up those windows - Your dog’s head should be kept inside at all times. Dogs are at risk of suffering from eye infections and allergic reactions from airborne irritants or suffering injuries from flying debris or rocks.
  • Never leave pets unattended - On hot summer days, cars can heat up very quickly to dangerous temperatures, even with the windows down.
  • Back of pickup trucks - Unrestrained dogs in the backs of pickup trucks can be dangerous. Pickup harnesses are available. *In Manitoba, it is illegal to travel with an unrestrained dog in the back of an open pickup truck.
  • Take a break - For longer car rides, give yourself and your pet a few rest stops every two or three hours.
  • Use barriers - These useful items allow you to drive without having your pet distract you and will keep them from chewing on upholstery, sunglasses or groceries.


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Prevent a Lost Pet

5 Things That Will Help You Protect Your Pets

1. Identify your pets

This is probably the most important thing you can do to prevent your pet from being permanently lost. Your pet should be micro chipped, tattooed and be wearing a collar. It is not enough just to have one or two of the above list, all three are vital. With a collar, someone could pick up your pet on the street and bring it right back to your house. With a tattoo, a small vet clinic without microchip readers can check the registry based on the tattoo. With a microchip, places like The WHS can immediately identify your pet and call you, even if the collar has been lost and the tattoo illegible.

2. Have pictures available

Sometimes we forget to keep taking pictures when our pet is no longer a puppy or a kitten, but a recent photo can make all the difference when an animal is lost. Keep some update colour photos available just in case.

3. Watch the front door

When expecting people, lock up animals who are likely to bolt. They may be cranky, but they will thank you for it when they are safe at home.

4. Don’t let cats wander

If you let your cats outside, chances are they will get lost. Even if they have been coming and going for ten years, it doesn’t mean that they will always find their way home, or that someone might assume they are lost and pick them up. Do not let cats outside the house unless you have an enclosed back yard, or you are walking them on a leash.

5. Know your pets

OK, so you’ve lost a black Lab cross. What else? Does he know any tricks that make him stand out? Does he have any scars or birth marks? What makes him different from all the other black labs we might receive? These details might make it easier for us to identity your pet.

Click here for more information on what to do if your pet is lost.


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Mon, 12 Jul 2010 10:38:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,75;Prevent-a-Lost-Pet http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,75;Prevent-a-Lost-Pet

5 Things That Will Help You Protect Your Pets

1. Identify your pets

This is probably the most important thing you can do to prevent your pet from being permanently lost. Your pet should be micro chipped, tattooed and be wearing a collar. It is not enough just to have one or two of the above list, all three are vital. With a collar, someone could pick up your pet on the street and bring it right back to your house. With a tattoo, a small vet clinic without microchip readers can check the registry based on the tattoo. With a microchip, places like The WHS can immediately identify your pet and call you, even if the collar has been lost and the tattoo illegible.

2. Have pictures available

Sometimes we forget to keep taking pictures when our pet is no longer a puppy or a kitten, but a recent photo can make all the difference when an animal is lost. Keep some update colour photos available just in case.

3. Watch the front door

When expecting people, lock up animals who are likely to bolt. They may be cranky, but they will thank you for it when they are safe at home.

4. Don’t let cats wander

If you let your cats outside, chances are they will get lost. Even if they have been coming and going for ten years, it doesn’t mean that they will always find their way home, or that someone might assume they are lost and pick them up. Do not let cats outside the house unless you have an enclosed back yard, or you are walking them on a leash.

5. Know your pets

OK, so you’ve lost a black Lab cross. What else? Does he know any tricks that make him stand out? Does he have any scars or birth marks? What makes him different from all the other black labs we might receive? These details might make it easier for us to identity your pet.

Click here for more information on what to do if your pet is lost.


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Keeping Everyone Safe from Dog Bites

A media event held on July 7 by The Winnipeg Humane Society, the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba Hydro and Canada Post reminded everyone to keep our service workers, such as our postmen and meter-readers, safe and sound from dog bites. 

In 2009, almost 250 dog bites were reported in Winnipeg.  This number can seem quite intimidating to workers who are required to enter your property on a regular basis, often when you're not around. 

Dogs that have bitten someone are required to be quarantined for 10 days to watch for rabies.  This can cost a pretty penny at $22 a day in addition to a minimum of a $350 fine.

Properly socializing your dog so that he or she is used to being around people will help prevent aggressive attacks or even rough play that can go wrong.  Winnipeg has a number of dog parks where you're dog can play and socialize with people and dogs and interacting with friends and family often will also be very helpful.

Read the news story from the Winnipeg Free Press or the Winnipeg Sun.
(Photo from Winnipeg Free Press)


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Thu, 08 Jul 2010 10:48:56 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,73;Keeping-Everyone-Safe-from-Dog-Bites http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,73;Keeping-Everyone-Safe-from-Dog-Bites

A media event held on July 7 by The Winnipeg Humane Society, the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba Hydro and Canada Post reminded everyone to keep our service workers, such as our postmen and meter-readers, safe and sound from dog bites. 

In 2009, almost 250 dog bites were reported in Winnipeg.  This number can seem quite intimidating to workers who are required to enter your property on a regular basis, often when you're not around. 

Dogs that have bitten someone are required to be quarantined for 10 days to watch for rabies.  This can cost a pretty penny at $22 a day in addition to a minimum of a $350 fine.

Properly socializing your dog so that he or she is used to being around people will help prevent aggressive attacks or even rough play that can go wrong.  Winnipeg has a number of dog parks where you're dog can play and socialize with people and dogs and interacting with friends and family often will also be very helpful.

Read the news story from the Winnipeg Free Press or the Winnipeg Sun.
(Photo from Winnipeg Free Press)


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Online Auction...

You can have a chance to win incredible items by bidding on The WHS's summer-fun online auction: http://www.digitalrelay.ca/donationrelay/whs/2009Auction/
All proceeds go to the pets in care at The WHS.


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Thu, 17 Jun 2010 12:05:57 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,66;Online-Auction http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,66;Online-Auction

You can have a chance to win incredible items by bidding on The WHS's summer-fun online auction: http://www.digitalrelay.ca/donationrelay/whs/2009Auction/
All proceeds go to the pets in care at The WHS.


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Support a Canadian Animal Abuse Registry

Visit this link to sign a petition in support of an animal abuse registry in Canada. 

The petition pre-amble reads as follows:

Currently there is a Child Abuse Registry and a Sex Offender Registry in Canada,  but what about our beloved pets and abused animals? This may be the answer.

In United States, State Senate majority leader Dean Florez proposed a bill that would require anyone convicted of a felony involving animal cruelty to register with the police for a public online forum, similar to sex offenders. Perhaps we should follow suit?

This registry would help identify people with a history of animal abuse, as well as serve as an early warning for future crimes, since people guilty of violent crimes often have a history of animal abuse. An online registry would also be useful for tracking these abusers, since many move to other provinces or states after they are caught. People who are involved in puppy mills, animal fighting rings, and hoarders of animals (which leads to neglect) could also be tracked more easily with an online registry.

An online registry of animal abusers would significantly benefit communities and law enforcement. Violence is more prevalent in our society and we need to take a stand to stop it from continuing.  Any form of abuse should not be tolerated.  Tell Prime Minister Stephen Harper it is time for an on line animal abuse registry in Canada.  Please be the voice for these innocent victims and our future.  Time to do what is right is RIGHT NOW!



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Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:59:09 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,65;Support-a-Canadian-Animal-Abuse-Registry http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,65;Support-a-Canadian-Animal-Abuse-Registry

Visit this link to sign a petition in support of an animal abuse registry in Canada. 

The petition pre-amble reads as follows:

Currently there is a Child Abuse Registry and a Sex Offender Registry in Canada,  but what about our beloved pets and abused animals? This may be the answer.

In United States, State Senate majority leader Dean Florez proposed a bill that would require anyone convicted of a felony involving animal cruelty to register with the police for a public online forum, similar to sex offenders. Perhaps we should follow suit?

This registry would help identify people with a history of animal abuse, as well as serve as an early warning for future crimes, since people guilty of violent crimes often have a history of animal abuse. An online registry would also be useful for tracking these abusers, since many move to other provinces or states after they are caught. People who are involved in puppy mills, animal fighting rings, and hoarders of animals (which leads to neglect) could also be tracked more easily with an online registry.

An online registry of animal abusers would significantly benefit communities and law enforcement. Violence is more prevalent in our society and we need to take a stand to stop it from continuing.  Any form of abuse should not be tolerated.  Tell Prime Minister Stephen Harper it is time for an on line animal abuse registry in Canada.  Please be the voice for these innocent victims and our future.  Time to do what is right is RIGHT NOW!



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Iams Food Recall Leaves WHS in Need

(WINNIPEG) – After an Iams wet cat food recall yesterday, The Winnipeg Humane Society had to clear it’s shelves of the product—one of the staples used to feed hundreds of cats and kittens on a daily basis.

In an effort to collect enough food to feed the almost 500 cats currently in the care of The WHS, a “Tin for the Bin” will get adopters $20 off an adult (six months and over) cat adoption tomorrow through Friday, June 18.  Any amount or kind of wet cat/kitten food dropped off will result in a voucher that can be redeemed within the week.

Cats in the shelter’s care receive a daily diet that includes a balance of both wet and dry food to promote optimal health.  Annual supplies of pet food are normally donated by Iams, but the recall has left caretakers at a loss until more food can be produced and shipped.

“We purchased what we could from local stores yesterday when we found out, but it is going to be a struggle to find enough wet food to feed the cats in the coming days,” said Lisa Rosin, Winnipeg Humane Society Director of Shelter Operations.  “We are now calling on Winnipegers to help in any way they can.  

Tests showed low levels of thiamine in ProActive Heath canned cat and kitten food  (3-ounce and 5.5-ounce cans) that have the dates 09/2011 to 06/2010 on the bottom.  The precautionary recall was implemented to prevent thiamine deficiencies in cats who are solely fed this product.  Thiamine deficiencies can result in a variety of health issues from weight loss to seizures in cats.

Adoption Hours:
Monday to Wednesday 12 pm – 8pm, Thursday to Friday 12 pm – 9 pm,
Saturday 10 am – 6pm and Sunday 12 pm – 6pm

See who's up for adoption.


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Fri, 11 Jun 2010 11:26:21 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,64;Iams-Food-Recall-Leaves-WHS-in-Need http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,64;Iams-Food-Recall-Leaves-WHS-in-Need

(WINNIPEG) – After an Iams wet cat food recall yesterday, The Winnipeg Humane Society had to clear it’s shelves of the product—one of the staples used to feed hundreds of cats and kittens on a daily basis.

In an effort to collect enough food to feed the almost 500 cats currently in the care of The WHS, a “Tin for the Bin” will get adopters $20 off an adult (six months and over) cat adoption tomorrow through Friday, June 18.  Any amount or kind of wet cat/kitten food dropped off will result in a voucher that can be redeemed within the week.

Cats in the shelter’s care receive a daily diet that includes a balance of both wet and dry food to promote optimal health.  Annual supplies of pet food are normally donated by Iams, but the recall has left caretakers at a loss until more food can be produced and shipped.

“We purchased what we could from local stores yesterday when we found out, but it is going to be a struggle to find enough wet food to feed the cats in the coming days,” said Lisa Rosin, Winnipeg Humane Society Director of Shelter Operations.  “We are now calling on Winnipegers to help in any way they can.  

Tests showed low levels of thiamine in ProActive Heath canned cat and kitten food  (3-ounce and 5.5-ounce cans) that have the dates 09/2011 to 06/2010 on the bottom.  The precautionary recall was implemented to prevent thiamine deficiencies in cats who are solely fed this product.  Thiamine deficiencies can result in a variety of health issues from weight loss to seizures in cats.

Adoption Hours:
Monday to Wednesday 12 pm – 8pm, Thursday to Friday 12 pm – 9 pm,
Saturday 10 am – 6pm and Sunday 12 pm – 6pm

See who's up for adoption.


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Fall in Love at The WHS If you are in search of the love of your life, why not take a trip down to The Winnipeg Humane Society?  We have hundreds of pets waiting for you to take them into your arms and hold them forever.







See who is up for adoption by checking online now, calling our adoption department at 982-2035 or visiting in person at 45 Hurst Way.


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Tue, 08 Jun 2010 15:43:36 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,62;Fall-in-Love-at-The-WHS http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,62;Fall-in-Love-at-The-WHS If you are in search of the love of your life, why not take a trip down to The Winnipeg Humane Society?  We have hundreds of pets waiting for you to take them into your arms and hold them forever.







See who is up for adoption by checking online now, calling our adoption department at 982-2035 or visiting in person at 45 Hurst Way.


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Don't Support Animals in Circuses

The Winnipeg Humane Society is against the use of exotic or wild animals in circuses or other entertainment events. We believe there is inherent cruelty involved in the training, confinement and constant travel these animals endure. As well, they are often depicted in a disrespectful manner by engaging in unnatural behaviour and preforming tricks.

This weekend, the Royal Canadian Circus will be preforming in the parking lot of Grant Park Mall. We would like to strongly discourage everyone from attending the show and supporting the use of animals in the circus.

Additionally, we have contacted the Province with a request to inspect the circus and the condition the animals are in.


Follow these links to learn more about animals used in circuses:

Animals in Entertainment - General information about wild/exotic animals who are forced to preform.
Nothing is Ever Really Free - An article about exposing young children to animals in entertainment.



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Thu, 03 Jun 2010 13:35:32 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,61;Dont-Support-Animals-in-Circuses http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,61;Dont-Support-Animals-in-Circuses

The Winnipeg Humane Society is against the use of exotic or wild animals in circuses or other entertainment events. We believe there is inherent cruelty involved in the training, confinement and constant travel these animals endure. As well, they are often depicted in a disrespectful manner by engaging in unnatural behaviour and preforming tricks.

This weekend, the Royal Canadian Circus will be preforming in the parking lot of Grant Park Mall. We would like to strongly discourage everyone from attending the show and supporting the use of animals in the circus.

Additionally, we have contacted the Province with a request to inspect the circus and the condition the animals are in.


Follow these links to learn more about animals used in circuses:

Animals in Entertainment - General information about wild/exotic animals who are forced to preform.
Nothing is Ever Really Free - An article about exposing young children to animals in entertainment.



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Dog to Dog Introductions by Susan Williams, Behaviour Manager

Very few dogs live in splendid isolation; they’re bound to meet another dog at some point in their lives. Almost every dog wants to meet another dog to play and interact with and it’s important for you, the owner, to understand all of the ins and outs of the proper introduction process.

How your dog responds to a meeting can depend on a number of factors: his temperament, level of socialization, previous experiences with meeting dogs, whether he is on a leash or free and, importantly, where the meeting is taking place—some dogs will do better where they feel safe and secure and others are better meeting in neutral territory.

Friendly Meetings

When well balanced, well socialized dogs meet, it’s a truly joyful experience. They’ll usually run towards each other wagging their tails, their mouths open and friendly like they are “smiling” at each other. They are so elated they cannot contain their excitement in their own bodies so they wiggle, jump and investigate each other using every single sense to familiarize themselves with their new buddy. Dogs can read other dogs a good distance away and this will make them approach each individual dog differently. However there are some over-enthusiastic dogs that ignore what they see in other dogs and may excitedly run up to a timid or insecure dog expecting to get the same enthusiastic greeting…which probably won’t happen.

Tense beginnings

Some dogs are not immediately friendly. This could stem from insecurity, previous bad experiences with other dogs or the size of the dog. These dogs will go through a series of subtle and not-so-subtle responses in order to form an understanding between each other. Some dogs feel a need to establish rank, so they may offer a challenge and will often approach other dogs at right angles with a tense body and erect ears. The dog that is being challenged can choose to return the challenge, submit, or run away. If the dog decides to return the challenge, he may turn and stand parallel to his challenger and rest his head on the dog’s back. This is not a cause for alarm but pay close attention as things can escalate from here.

These challenges and responses get layered on fairly quickly; a paw on the shoulder, a close up stare or a growl can quickly escalate into a fight. More often than not, one of the dogs will fold and will signal his acquiescence and then the fun can begin.

It is important that during these meetings you are watching and praising good behaviour and, if you see that the meeting is not going well, you immediately redirect your dog's attention to something else. It is always better (and safer) to separate the escalating dogs before a fight breaks out. Stopping the escalation is as simple as calling your dog away from the other and moving in a different direction. They may meet again on another day, and each time they meet with positive responses, don’t forget the praise!

Of course, some dogs just don’t like each other, no matter what you do. Just like people, no matter how socialized and well balanced they are, it is possible that your dog will never become friends with certain dogs in the neighbourhood.

Scared and Unsure Dogs

For a scared dog, make sure an introduction takes place in a quiet, calm space. With too many dogs around, the experience may prove to be distressing and negative for your pooch.

If your dog is scared or insecure, make sure that the time he spends meeting other dogs is short to avoid overwhelming him. Make sure the experience is positive, encourage your dog with your voice and praise him when he shows he is being brave. When it’s time to go, always call your dog away from the other dog—don’t pull on the leash. This teaches your dog that he can turn and walk away on his own and doesn't trigger a reaction from being physically pulled.

Size Differences

With small dogs it is best to set up a play session with other small dogs to help your little friend learn to meet and read dog body language. It also makes it less likely that your dog will be hurt unintentionally. A good rule of thumb is if one dog is 50% bigger than the other, they shouldn't play together unless they live together or know each other well. Otherwise the small dogs are easily hurt by the bigger dogs and a play session gone wrong can cause fear and aggression towards larger dogs.

Paws in Motion

Attending a function for dogs, such as Paws in Motion, where there are hundreds of other dogs around, is a unique situation. It is exciting and fun for us to take our dogs to this type of event because we get to show off our pets and have people meet them while supporting a great cause.

The most important thing when taking your dog to an event like this, is to make sure he can handle being around other dogs. You’ll both meet every type of dog there is—some will be nice, some won’t. Some will react because there are just too many dogs around and some will ignore all of them.

Try to make the experience as enjoyable as possible for your dog. Bring treats to reward him when he is good but also remember to give him a break from the excitement now and then. Take him for a bit of a walk away from everyone and rejoin the fun after a few minutes. Be relaxed and happy and your energy will transfer to your dog. If he meets another dog that is not quite as happy and there is a bit of an altercation, don’t overreact. The best thing to do is calmly make sure he is not hurt and then move on to show him it is over and there is still much fun to be had with the other dogs. Additionally, always keep in mind that a public event like Paws in Motion can be a great outing but you have to know your dog and realize when he has had enough and is over-stimulated or just tired. When it’s time to go home, both the animals and humans that participated will feel great after a day of good exercise, socialization and making a difference in our community.


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Fri, 21 May 2010 16:01:25 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,60;Dog-to-Dog-Introductions http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,60;Dog-to-Dog-Introductions by Susan Williams, Behaviour Manager

Very few dogs live in splendid isolation; they’re bound to meet another dog at some point in their lives. Almost every dog wants to meet another dog to play and interact with and it’s important for you, the owner, to understand all of the ins and outs of the proper introduction process.

How your dog responds to a meeting can depend on a number of factors: his temperament, level of socialization, previous experiences with meeting dogs, whether he is on a leash or free and, importantly, where the meeting is taking place—some dogs will do better where they feel safe and secure and others are better meeting in neutral territory.

Friendly Meetings

When well balanced, well socialized dogs meet, it’s a truly joyful experience. They’ll usually run towards each other wagging their tails, their mouths open and friendly like they are “smiling” at each other. They are so elated they cannot contain their excitement in their own bodies so they wiggle, jump and investigate each other using every single sense to familiarize themselves with their new buddy. Dogs can read other dogs a good distance away and this will make them approach each individual dog differently. However there are some over-enthusiastic dogs that ignore what they see in other dogs and may excitedly run up to a timid or insecure dog expecting to get the same enthusiastic greeting…which probably won’t happen.

Tense beginnings

Some dogs are not immediately friendly. This could stem from insecurity, previous bad experiences with other dogs or the size of the dog. These dogs will go through a series of subtle and not-so-subtle responses in order to form an understanding between each other. Some dogs feel a need to establish rank, so they may offer a challenge and will often approach other dogs at right angles with a tense body and erect ears. The dog that is being challenged can choose to return the challenge, submit, or run away. If the dog decides to return the challenge, he may turn and stand parallel to his challenger and rest his head on the dog’s back. This is not a cause for alarm but pay close attention as things can escalate from here.

These challenges and responses get layered on fairly quickly; a paw on the shoulder, a close up stare or a growl can quickly escalate into a fight. More often than not, one of the dogs will fold and will signal his acquiescence and then the fun can begin.

It is important that during these meetings you are watching and praising good behaviour and, if you see that the meeting is not going well, you immediately redirect your dog's attention to something else. It is always better (and safer) to separate the escalating dogs before a fight breaks out. Stopping the escalation is as simple as calling your dog away from the other and moving in a different direction. They may meet again on another day, and each time they meet with positive responses, don’t forget the praise!

Of course, some dogs just don’t like each other, no matter what you do. Just like people, no matter how socialized and well balanced they are, it is possible that your dog will never become friends with certain dogs in the neighbourhood.

Scared and Unsure Dogs

For a scared dog, make sure an introduction takes place in a quiet, calm space. With too many dogs around, the experience may prove to be distressing and negative for your pooch.

If your dog is scared or insecure, make sure that the time he spends meeting other dogs is short to avoid overwhelming him. Make sure the experience is positive, encourage your dog with your voice and praise him when he shows he is being brave. When it’s time to go, always call your dog away from the other dog—don’t pull on the leash. This teaches your dog that he can turn and walk away on his own and doesn't trigger a reaction from being physically pulled.

Size Differences

With small dogs it is best to set up a play session with other small dogs to help your little friend learn to meet and read dog body language. It also makes it less likely that your dog will be hurt unintentionally. A good rule of thumb is if one dog is 50% bigger than the other, they shouldn't play together unless they live together or know each other well. Otherwise the small dogs are easily hurt by the bigger dogs and a play session gone wrong can cause fear and aggression towards larger dogs.

Paws in Motion

Attending a function for dogs, such as Paws in Motion, where there are hundreds of other dogs around, is a unique situation. It is exciting and fun for us to take our dogs to this type of event because we get to show off our pets and have people meet them while supporting a great cause.

The most important thing when taking your dog to an event like this, is to make sure he can handle being around other dogs. You’ll both meet every type of dog there is—some will be nice, some won’t. Some will react because there are just too many dogs around and some will ignore all of them.

Try to make the experience as enjoyable as possible for your dog. Bring treats to reward him when he is good but also remember to give him a break from the excitement now and then. Take him for a bit of a walk away from everyone and rejoin the fun after a few minutes. Be relaxed and happy and your energy will transfer to your dog. If he meets another dog that is not quite as happy and there is a bit of an altercation, don’t overreact. The best thing to do is calmly make sure he is not hurt and then move on to show him it is over and there is still much fun to be had with the other dogs. Additionally, always keep in mind that a public event like Paws in Motion can be a great outing but you have to know your dog and realize when he has had enough and is over-stimulated or just tired. When it’s time to go home, both the animals and humans that participated will feel great after a day of good exercise, socialization and making a difference in our community.


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Dogs Running at Large Now Rescued Through efforts coordinated by The Province of Manitoba, the Rural Municipality (R.M.) of East St. Paul, Darcy’s A.R.C., and The Winnipeg Humane Society, 10 dogs that were running at large as a result of the owners untimely death have been captured and are being cared for.  

 “The province is helping the R.M., and we are helping the Province. Most importantly, this means these homeless animals are being helped “said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director. Of the 10 dogs that have been captured, 4 of the females are pregnant. The WHS and Darcy’s A.R.C. have sourced foster homes that will care for the pregnant females.

The WHS will continue to work closely with the province and R.M. of East St. Paul in finding homes for the remaining dogs.

Additionally, the R.M. of East St. Paul and the Province remain in pursuit of 2 dogs. 

Click here to see a photo gallery of the dogs during their intake process at The Winnipeg Humane Society.

                    



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Thu, 18 Mar 2010 14:28:14 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,44;Dogs-Running-at-Large-Now-Rescued http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,44;Dogs-Running-at-Large-Now-Rescued Through efforts coordinated by The Province of Manitoba, the Rural Municipality (R.M.) of East St. Paul, Darcy’s A.R.C., and The Winnipeg Humane Society, 10 dogs that were running at large as a result of the owners untimely death have been captured and are being cared for.  

 “The province is helping the R.M., and we are helping the Province. Most importantly, this means these homeless animals are being helped “said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director. Of the 10 dogs that have been captured, 4 of the females are pregnant. The WHS and Darcy’s A.R.C. have sourced foster homes that will care for the pregnant females.

The WHS will continue to work closely with the province and R.M. of East St. Paul in finding homes for the remaining dogs.

Additionally, the R.M. of East St. Paul and the Province remain in pursuit of 2 dogs. 

Click here to see a photo gallery of the dogs during their intake process at The Winnipeg Humane Society.

                    



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Hundreds of Shelter Animals Helped

(Winnipeg. - March 16, 2010) - The Winnipeg Humane Society is the proud recipient of $7,100 raised from a pancake breakfast organized by École Robert H. Smith School. The March 5 breakfast was the most successful for the school, “We are a giving school and our students have a lot of pride and ownership of the school and events, one being our Community Breakfast,” said Tom Rossi, Principal.  

In September, grade 6 students gather to discuss and vote on a charity of choice.  Throughout the school year, they continued to learn about the shelter, “When Mr. McDonald visited our school with Cassidy, I didn’t know a dog could live with only three legs,” said Kate Friesen, École Robert H. Smith School grade 6 student, “I heard about The WHS, but didn’t know how they helped so many animals. If we don’t help them where else would so many animals go?”

WHS Executive Director, Bill McDonald was on hand to flip flap jacks, while his 3-legged WHS rescue dog Cassidy socialized with guests, “These kids have demonstrated tremendous leadership.  They have helped us save lives through their caring action.  This money will go to caring for nearly 400 animals that need our love and attention.”


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Mon, 15 Mar 2010 15:22:26 -0500 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,43;Hundreds-of-Shelter-Animals-Helped http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,43;Hundreds-of-Shelter-Animals-Helped

(Winnipeg. - March 16, 2010) - The Winnipeg Humane Society is the proud recipient of $7,100 raised from a pancake breakfast organized by École Robert H. Smith School. The March 5 breakfast was the most successful for the school, “We are a giving school and our students have a lot of pride and ownership of the school and events, one being our Community Breakfast,” said Tom Rossi, Principal.  

In September, grade 6 students gather to discuss and vote on a charity of choice.  Throughout the school year, they continued to learn about the shelter, “When Mr. McDonald visited our school with Cassidy, I didn’t know a dog could live with only three legs,” said Kate Friesen, École Robert H. Smith School grade 6 student, “I heard about The WHS, but didn’t know how they helped so many animals. If we don’t help them where else would so many animals go?”

WHS Executive Director, Bill McDonald was on hand to flip flap jacks, while his 3-legged WHS rescue dog Cassidy socialized with guests, “These kids have demonstrated tremendous leadership.  They have helped us save lives through their caring action.  This money will go to caring for nearly 400 animals that need our love and attention.”


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Read Our Latest Newsletter Download a PDF of one of our latest newsletter.

2010 Winter Newsletter

Featuring:
  • Animal Hoarding: A Collector's Nightmare
  • Dog-Reactive Dogs: Tips from an Expert
  • Farm Animal Welfare news
  • Can We Teach Ethics: Executive Director's Message
  • And more!


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Fri, 12 Mar 2010 17:24:03 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,42;Read-Our-Latest-Newsletter http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,42;Read-Our-Latest-Newsletter Download a PDF of one of our latest newsletter.

2010 Winter Newsletter

Featuring:
  • Animal Hoarding: A Collector's Nightmare
  • Dog-Reactive Dogs: Tips from an Expert
  • Farm Animal Welfare news
  • Can We Teach Ethics: Executive Director's Message
  • And more!


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Humane Egg Production Policy Announced

(WINNIPEG) – Manitoba Egg Farmers (MEF) announced on Wednesday, March 10, a new policy that will see that laying hens live more humane, enriched lives.  The policy is built around the “Five Freedoms”, an animal welfare ideology that The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) has been advocating for over a decade.

“We are thrilled to see MEF taking steps to implement proper animal welfare,” said Bill McDonald, Executive Director of The WHS.  “The public’s attitude towards farm animals is changing.  We know that people care about how farm animals are treated.  This includes how laying hens are housed.”

“MEF recognizes the importance of showing leadership and aligning ourselves with society’s values,” said Penny Kelly, MEF’s General Manager.

The policy states that after 2018, all new or renovated laying hen facilities must have enriched living areas that support all five freedoms: freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition; freedom from discomfort; freedom from pain, injury and disease; freedom to express normal behaviour; and freedom from fear and distress.


# # #

Background – WHS Advocacy:
The WHS’s largest farm animal advocacy campaign, Quit Stalling, advocates to ban gestation crates, 2 by 6 foot pens where pregnant pigs (sows) are forced to spend their entire lives.  Recently The WHS has teamed up with several other major animal welfare organizations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), to develop a cooperative plan to promote cage free eggs and chicken throughout Canada.


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Fri, 12 Mar 2010 16:42:29 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,41;Humane-Egg-Production-Policy-Announced http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,41;Humane-Egg-Production-Policy-Announced

(WINNIPEG) – Manitoba Egg Farmers (MEF) announced on Wednesday, March 10, a new policy that will see that laying hens live more humane, enriched lives.  The policy is built around the “Five Freedoms”, an animal welfare ideology that The Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) has been advocating for over a decade.

“We are thrilled to see MEF taking steps to implement proper animal welfare,” said Bill McDonald, Executive Director of The WHS.  “The public’s attitude towards farm animals is changing.  We know that people care about how farm animals are treated.  This includes how laying hens are housed.”

“MEF recognizes the importance of showing leadership and aligning ourselves with society’s values,” said Penny Kelly, MEF’s General Manager.

The policy states that after 2018, all new or renovated laying hen facilities must have enriched living areas that support all five freedoms: freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition; freedom from discomfort; freedom from pain, injury and disease; freedom to express normal behaviour; and freedom from fear and distress.


# # #

Background – WHS Advocacy:
The WHS’s largest farm animal advocacy campaign, Quit Stalling, advocates to ban gestation crates, 2 by 6 foot pens where pregnant pigs (sows) are forced to spend their entire lives.  Recently The WHS has teamed up with several other major animal welfare organizations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), to develop a cooperative plan to promote cage free eggs and chicken throughout Canada.


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Ban Cat and Dog Fur in Canada Click here to sign an online petition in support of Bill C-439, a private members bill that will ban the import and sale of products that include cat and dog fur in Canada.

If you would like to print and circulate a hard copy of the official petition, download the pdf here.  Please return signed petitions to:

ATTN: Jenelle Petrinchuk
The Winnipeg Humane Society
45 Hurst Way
Winnipeg, MB
R3T 0R3

Contact Jenelle by phone (988-8810) or email if you would like a hard copy of the petition mailed to you.

Read more about the Cat and Dog Fur Industry.


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Mon, 22 Feb 2010 15:01:37 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,40;Ban-Cat-and-Dog-Fur-in-Canada http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,40;Ban-Cat-and-Dog-Fur-in-Canada Click here to sign an online petition in support of Bill C-439, a private members bill that will ban the import and sale of products that include cat and dog fur in Canada.

If you would like to print and circulate a hard copy of the official petition, download the pdf here.  Please return signed petitions to:

ATTN: Jenelle Petrinchuk
The Winnipeg Humane Society
45 Hurst Way
Winnipeg, MB
R3T 0R3

Contact Jenelle by phone (988-8810) or email if you would like a hard copy of the petition mailed to you.

Read more about the Cat and Dog Fur Industry.


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WHS Pups Transferred to Edmonton

(WINNIPEG) – A truck load of homeless Winnipeg puppies has arrived at the Edmonton Humane Society (EHS) as part of a crucial animal transfer to give the dogs a second chance at finding a loving home.  

The 21 puppies were sent to the EHS because the Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is struggling lately to find homes for puppies.  The WHS has noticed fewer adoptions, especially for puppies living at their shelter.  The Society’s building is starting to fill up, and a larger than normal number of animals living there are puppies.  

“Pups need a home environment and the individual care and training to grow into stable pets,” says Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We are so thankful that the Edmonton Humane Society is helping us give these dogs the proper start.  We approached the EHS because of their success at adopting animals and because Edmonton is known for being a family oriented community which loves pets.”

The dogs were transported in an EHS vehicle driven by volunteers Sandy and Les Raubenheimer.  The couple left Edmonton on Thursday, February 18 for Winnipeg.  They loaded up the puppies from the WHS over the weekend and arrived back in Edmonton late on Sunday, February 21.  The west-end Lexus of Edmonton dealership paid for the vehicle’s gas.  Edmonton’s Cochrane’s Automotive Repair serviced the EHS vehicle before the 1,700 km trip at no cost.

“It never ceases to amaze us how generous people in our community can be in order to give animals a much needed chance at a wonderful life, “says EHS spokesperson Shawna Randolph.  “We greatly appreciate everything done to make this animal transfer possible.”

The puppies have all been spayed or neutered before leaving Winnipeg.  They will still require standard medical and behaviour testing before being placed up for adoption.  It is estimated that they may be available within a few days.  The public is advised to watch the EHS website for updates at www.edmontonhumanesociety.com.  


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Mon, 22 Feb 2010 14:05:58 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,39;WHS-Pups-Transferred-to-Edmonton http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,39;WHS-Pups-Transferred-to-Edmonton

(WINNIPEG) – A truck load of homeless Winnipeg puppies has arrived at the Edmonton Humane Society (EHS) as part of a crucial animal transfer to give the dogs a second chance at finding a loving home.  

The 21 puppies were sent to the EHS because the Winnipeg Humane Society (WHS) is struggling lately to find homes for puppies.  The WHS has noticed fewer adoptions, especially for puppies living at their shelter.  The Society’s building is starting to fill up, and a larger than normal number of animals living there are puppies.  

“Pups need a home environment and the individual care and training to grow into stable pets,” says Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We are so thankful that the Edmonton Humane Society is helping us give these dogs the proper start.  We approached the EHS because of their success at adopting animals and because Edmonton is known for being a family oriented community which loves pets.”

The dogs were transported in an EHS vehicle driven by volunteers Sandy and Les Raubenheimer.  The couple left Edmonton on Thursday, February 18 for Winnipeg.  They loaded up the puppies from the WHS over the weekend and arrived back in Edmonton late on Sunday, February 21.  The west-end Lexus of Edmonton dealership paid for the vehicle’s gas.  Edmonton’s Cochrane’s Automotive Repair serviced the EHS vehicle before the 1,700 km trip at no cost.

“It never ceases to amaze us how generous people in our community can be in order to give animals a much needed chance at a wonderful life, “says EHS spokesperson Shawna Randolph.  “We greatly appreciate everything done to make this animal transfer possible.”

The puppies have all been spayed or neutered before leaving Winnipeg.  They will still require standard medical and behaviour testing before being placed up for adoption.  It is estimated that they may be available within a few days.  The public is advised to watch the EHS website for updates at www.edmontonhumanesociety.com.  


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Help Haiti If you would like to make a donation to help animal in Haiti recover from the earthquake, please visit the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

They are currently collecting money for their emergency relief team's Haiti Relief Mission.  Your donation will help purchase supplies for their mobile veterinary clinic.


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Mon, 22 Feb 2010 13:53:18 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,38;Help-Haiti http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,38;Help-Haiti If you would like to make a donation to help animal in Haiti recover from the earthquake, please visit the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

They are currently collecting money for their emergency relief team's Haiti Relief Mission.  Your donation will help purchase supplies for their mobile veterinary clinic.


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Rescued Dogs Up for Adoption

Quill was rescued and brought to us with porcupine quills all over his face and front legs.

Upon further examination by our clinic staff, it was discovered that he also had heartworm (a potentially fatal parasite if left untreated), more than 20 pieces of lead shot from a small gun embedded in the right side of his head, and an eye infection so severe his eye needed to be surgically removed.

We have been caring for Quill since the end of October last year, and are thrilled to see him move to the adoption area where he can start looking for his forever home.

Quill is a 2 year old, black lab mix and has a super sweet disposition. Even after all he has been through, he's just happy to be here surrounded by people who love him.

Quill is available for adoption today. If you can find it in your heart to give this more-than-deserving dog and place in your family, come visit him or call 982-2035 for more information.

Dublin was found wandering the streets of a northern community with severe injuries to his body. He could barely put any weight on one of his front legs and had a long cut up his side and back.

Luckily, a caring citizen decided to rescue him and Dublin was flown into Winnipeg and taken straight to our shelter. Here our veterinary team took x-rays of his leg and realized it had been broken and healed improperly. Along with the gash up his side, Dublin was in a lot of pain but amazingly was still in high spirits!

Since Dublin's leg healed from it's break in such an awkward and painful way it was necessary to amputate the leg from the shoulder down. We preformed the surgery in our shelter clinic and everything went wonderfully.

Dublin has already spent a few weeks in foster care and is recovering nicely. He has never been happier and is much more comfortable without the constant pain of his front leg. He is an amazingly friendly and gentle dog, who seems to love everyone that passes him by. He already barely even notices he is missing one of his legs!

Dublin is now up for adoption and is ready to go home today. If you're interested in bringing this phenomenal dog into your home and family, please visit us or call our adoption department at 982-2035.


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Thu, 04 Feb 2010 13:46:51 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,37;Rescued-Dogs-Up-for-Adoption http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,37;Rescued-Dogs-Up-for-Adoption

Quill was rescued and brought to us with porcupine quills all over his face and front legs.

Upon further examination by our clinic staff, it was discovered that he also had heartworm (a potentially fatal parasite if left untreated), more than 20 pieces of lead shot from a small gun embedded in the right side of his head, and an eye infection so severe his eye needed to be surgically removed.

We have been caring for Quill since the end of October last year, and are thrilled to see him move to the adoption area where he can start looking for his forever home.

Quill is a 2 year old, black lab mix and has a super sweet disposition. Even after all he has been through, he's just happy to be here surrounded by people who love him.

Quill is available for adoption today. If you can find it in your heart to give this more-than-deserving dog and place in your family, come visit him or call 982-2035 for more information.

Dublin was found wandering the streets of a northern community with severe injuries to his body. He could barely put any weight on one of his front legs and had a long cut up his side and back.

Luckily, a caring citizen decided to rescue him and Dublin was flown into Winnipeg and taken straight to our shelter. Here our veterinary team took x-rays of his leg and realized it had been broken and healed improperly. Along with the gash up his side, Dublin was in a lot of pain but amazingly was still in high spirits!

Since Dublin's leg healed from it's break in such an awkward and painful way it was necessary to amputate the leg from the shoulder down. We preformed the surgery in our shelter clinic and everything went wonderfully.

Dublin has already spent a few weeks in foster care and is recovering nicely. He has never been happier and is much more comfortable without the constant pain of his front leg. He is an amazingly friendly and gentle dog, who seems to love everyone that passes him by. He already barely even notices he is missing one of his legs!

Dublin is now up for adoption and is ready to go home today. If you're interested in bringing this phenomenal dog into your home and family, please visit us or call our adoption department at 982-2035.


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WHS Hits High Note with Volunteers: Record numbers reached The Winnipeg Humane Society relies heavily on volunteers to assist in every department within the organization. Today, The WHS announced the highest number of recorded hours and volunteer in its history.

To date for 2009, nearly 800 volunteers have logged over 31,000 hours. This results in an 8 to 1 staff to volunteer ratio, “Each and every day we reap the benefits of having hundreds of volunteers help us make a difference in the lives of shelter animals, and to our community,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director.

The WHS attributes the increase in volunteer time due to improvements in efficiencies, newly implemented programs and volunteer positions as a result of their new shelter. Meet Your Match© is just one of these volunteer driven programs. A team of trained volunteers now assist in the assessments of cats in order to determine their personality. "Volunteers contribute directly to the success of our adoption matches," said Kelle Roth, WHS Manager of Volunteer Services, "they not only help us put our donations towards the animals in our care, they bring inspiration and dedication to The WHS each and every day.”


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:32:30 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,35;WHS-Hits-High-Note-with-Volunteers-Record-numbers-reached http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,35;WHS-Hits-High-Note-with-Volunteers-Record-numbers-reached The Winnipeg Humane Society relies heavily on volunteers to assist in every department within the organization. Today, The WHS announced the highest number of recorded hours and volunteer in its history.

To date for 2009, nearly 800 volunteers have logged over 31,000 hours. This results in an 8 to 1 staff to volunteer ratio, “Each and every day we reap the benefits of having hundreds of volunteers help us make a difference in the lives of shelter animals, and to our community,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director.

The WHS attributes the increase in volunteer time due to improvements in efficiencies, newly implemented programs and volunteer positions as a result of their new shelter. Meet Your Match© is just one of these volunteer driven programs. A team of trained volunteers now assist in the assessments of cats in order to determine their personality. "Volunteers contribute directly to the success of our adoption matches," said Kelle Roth, WHS Manager of Volunteer Services, "they not only help us put our donations towards the animals in our care, they bring inspiration and dedication to The WHS each and every day.”


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Record breaking number of adoptions: "Our most sincere thanks" This past weekend, 201 animals left The Winnipeg Humane Society with their new forever families—the highest number of adoptions in the shelter’s 115 year history.

“Our most sincere thanks to everyone who took an animal home this weekend. The community really pulled together for these animals and made a big difference in many lives,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director. Just last week, The WHS called out to Winnipeggers asking for help when intake numbers sky-rocketed to over 900 animals in September alone. Cats, kittens and dogs were available for reduced adoption fees on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

“To give you an idea of just how huge this is, the most adoptions we’ve ever seen in any given day has been 37, which was during our last cat promotion in July of 2009. This past Saturday there were 79 adoptions in one day, more than doubling our previous record.”

Weekday staff walked into an almost empty adoptions area on Monday, with only 8 cats left, 6 of which are on hold. One hundred and fifty-nine cats found new homes over the weekend, including 12 adopted out of The WHS’s 7 satellite centres.

Thirty-seven dogs were adopted, with 12 more on hold as of Monday morning. With a couple exceptions, most of the remaining animals still up for adoption are black, statistically the hardest colour of animal to re-home.

“Staff will be working hard this week, getting more animals spayed and neutered and approved for adoption, but it’s all worth it after seeing what we’re able to accomplish when the whole community bands together,” said McDonald, “Thank-you Winnipeg!”


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:31:48 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,34;Record-breaking-number-of-adoptions-Our-most-sincere-thanks http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,34;Record-breaking-number-of-adoptions-Our-most-sincere-thanks This past weekend, 201 animals left The Winnipeg Humane Society with their new forever families—the highest number of adoptions in the shelter’s 115 year history.

“Our most sincere thanks to everyone who took an animal home this weekend. The community really pulled together for these animals and made a big difference in many lives,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director. Just last week, The WHS called out to Winnipeggers asking for help when intake numbers sky-rocketed to over 900 animals in September alone. Cats, kittens and dogs were available for reduced adoption fees on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

“To give you an idea of just how huge this is, the most adoptions we’ve ever seen in any given day has been 37, which was during our last cat promotion in July of 2009. This past Saturday there were 79 adoptions in one day, more than doubling our previous record.”

Weekday staff walked into an almost empty adoptions area on Monday, with only 8 cats left, 6 of which are on hold. One hundred and fifty-nine cats found new homes over the weekend, including 12 adopted out of The WHS’s 7 satellite centres.

Thirty-seven dogs were adopted, with 12 more on hold as of Monday morning. With a couple exceptions, most of the remaining animals still up for adoption are black, statistically the hardest colour of animal to re-home.

“Staff will be working hard this week, getting more animals spayed and neutered and approved for adoption, but it’s all worth it after seeing what we’re able to accomplish when the whole community bands together,” said McDonald, “Thank-you Winnipeg!”


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500 More Cats and Dogs at WHS: Cats $25 Dogs $75 ats. As of the end of September, the shelter has received nearly 500 more cats and dogs over the previous year. “We need to get them into homes, and get them out of here, as soon as we can. I cannot stress this enough,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We’ve even reduced our price to make it that much more desirable.” Numbers began to climb by June, and continued throughout the summer, reaching 5,980 incoming cats and dogs by September 30.

Intake numbers sky-rocketed to over 900 in September alone. The WHS took in over 640 stray animals—over 210 more than the same period in 2008. Combined with 250 owner-relinquished cats and dogs, shelter staff are determined to find homes for hundreds of animals.

In an attempt to open up space all cats over 6 months old will be $25, and dogs over 6 months old will be $75, October 16-18. In addition, kittens six months old and younger will be $25 off. This includes feline leukemia/FIV testing, spay and neuter surgery, tattoo, first vaccination, de-worming, 6 weeks of Pet Secure Insurance, and two-week health check.

As a result of the high numbers of cats and dogs at the shelter, The WHS is in urgent need of foster homes and wet cat & dog food. Monetary donations will also be accepted.

Adoption Hours


Monday - Friday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:31:16 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,33;500-More-Cats-and-Dogs-at-WHS-Cats-$25-Dogs-$75 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,33;500-More-Cats-and-Dogs-at-WHS-Cats-$25-Dogs-$75 ats. As of the end of September, the shelter has received nearly 500 more cats and dogs over the previous year. “We need to get them into homes, and get them out of here, as soon as we can. I cannot stress this enough,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We’ve even reduced our price to make it that much more desirable.” Numbers began to climb by June, and continued throughout the summer, reaching 5,980 incoming cats and dogs by September 30.

Intake numbers sky-rocketed to over 900 in September alone. The WHS took in over 640 stray animals—over 210 more than the same period in 2008. Combined with 250 owner-relinquished cats and dogs, shelter staff are determined to find homes for hundreds of animals.

In an attempt to open up space all cats over 6 months old will be $25, and dogs over 6 months old will be $75, October 16-18. In addition, kittens six months old and younger will be $25 off. This includes feline leukemia/FIV testing, spay and neuter surgery, tattoo, first vaccination, de-worming, 6 weeks of Pet Secure Insurance, and two-week health check.

As a result of the high numbers of cats and dogs at the shelter, The WHS is in urgent need of foster homes and wet cat & dog food. Monetary donations will also be accepted.

Adoption Hours


Monday - Friday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.


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Bill Resurrected to Ban Cat and Dog Fur Products in Canada Today local Liberal MP Anita Neville has tabled a Private Members Bill that will ban cat and dog fur products in Canada. Bill C-439 which consists of the addition of cat and dog fur to the Hazardous Products Act, was first introduced in 2006 but was later dissolved when the 2008 election was called.

The Winnipeg Humane Society supports Bill C-439, “we are appalled by the filthy conditions dogs and cats are kept in, only to meet their demise in horrific and inhumane ways,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We can do more to protect these animals, first and foremost let’s stop buying their fur

“Products that use Cat and Dog Fur products are banned in countries all over the world,” said Ms. Neville. “Yet these products remain legal and can be imported, exported and sold in Canada without any labels, this is a deplorable practice and must be stopped.”

Leading animal welfare organizations such as the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International estimate that over 2 million dogs and cats are brutally slaughtered for their fur each year. This practice is based mainly out of China, but also occurs in Thailand, the Philippines and other Southeast Asian regions; the fur products are then legally sold in Canada, usually without labels properly stating what type of fur it is.


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:30:06 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,32;Bill-Resurrected-to-Ban-Cat-and-Dog-Fur-Products-in-Canada http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,32;Bill-Resurrected-to-Ban-Cat-and-Dog-Fur-Products-in-Canada Today local Liberal MP Anita Neville has tabled a Private Members Bill that will ban cat and dog fur products in Canada. Bill C-439 which consists of the addition of cat and dog fur to the Hazardous Products Act, was first introduced in 2006 but was later dissolved when the 2008 election was called.

The Winnipeg Humane Society supports Bill C-439, “we are appalled by the filthy conditions dogs and cats are kept in, only to meet their demise in horrific and inhumane ways,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director, “We can do more to protect these animals, first and foremost let’s stop buying their fur

“Products that use Cat and Dog Fur products are banned in countries all over the world,” said Ms. Neville. “Yet these products remain legal and can be imported, exported and sold in Canada without any labels, this is a deplorable practice and must be stopped.”

Leading animal welfare organizations such as the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International estimate that over 2 million dogs and cats are brutally slaughtered for their fur each year. This practice is based mainly out of China, but also occurs in Thailand, the Philippines and other Southeast Asian regions; the fur products are then legally sold in Canada, usually without labels properly stating what type of fur it is.


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Dog Bites Cause Preventable Injuries The City of Winnipeg is partnering with Canada Post, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and the Winnipeg Humane Society on an initiative that will promote a safer environment, not only for letter carriers and utility workers, but for all Manitobans.

The organizations are producing a responsible pet ownership brochure that will be distributed to 50,000 pet owners every year through dog license renewals distributed by the City of Winnipeg and to new pet owners through Winnipeg Humane Society adoption kits.

“Though the majority of people are responsible pet owners,” said Tim Dack, Chief Operating Officer, City of Winnipeg Animal Services, “there are still too many dog biting incidents that occur. Service workers should not have to deal with dangerous dogs while carrying out their duties. In 2008 the City of Winnipeg, Animal Services Agency dealt with 230 incidences involving a dog biting a person. Dog bites can range from a nip to severe. No matter the severity of the physical bite a biting dog can cause significant emotional trauma that can stay with someone for many years. Dog owners need to be aware that although their dogs may be perfectly fine when they are with them, their dogs may be aggressive to strangers particularly those service people who show up once in a while on their property.”

"Most dog bites are preventable," said Joe Thievin, General Manager, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services. "Unfortunately, meter readers, by the nature of their jobs, are still prime candidates. Through education and awareness our employees become able to identify and effectively handle conflict with a dog. Public awareness is also necessary and this initiative will help pet owners do their part."

“We are extremely pleased to participate in the production of the brochure. Responsible pet ownership is key to preventing dog bites,” said Ian Irvine, Manager, Delivery Operations, Canada Post. “Since 2008, 18 Manitoba letter carriers have been bitten, and 17 of those happened right here in Winnipeg.

Irvine noted that 13 of those bites caused letter carriers to miss 59 days of work, meaning that on average, each bite caused an employee to take more than four days off to recover.

The City of Winnipeg, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and Canada Post are committed to providing a healthy and safe work environment by developing and implementing measures to minimize risk to the personal health and safety of their employees. Attacks due to dog incidents/bites are a reality and cause serious injuries every year. This is especially true for strangers entering a yard for the first time and for employees who replace regular employees during holidays since they are unfamiliar to a dog on the route.

The Canada Safety Council estimates there are 460,000 dog bite incidents in any given year and of those, 500 bites are to Canada Post letter carriers. It is impossible to estimate how many more bites occur that are not reported.

“Dogs will bite for any number of reasons, in these instances it is commonly due to the fact a stranger is entering the yard, and the dog takes it as either a threat, or some dogs make it a game. Bites can occur in both instances. There are steps dog owners can take to help manage their dogs’ behaviour,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director.

All dog owners and homeowners need to do their part to ensure their property is safe for visitors. Manitoba Hydro Utility Services requires that if a dog is present inside the house during a service call, it must be restrained until the utility employee leaves the premises. All dogs should be kept on a leash, in a fenced-in yard, or in the home during delivery hours. Keeping dogs and delivery/utility workers and other visitors apart keeps everyone, including the dog, safe and secure.

For the first time, Canada Post is banning letter carriers from handing out dog treats on their routes. By offering treats, employees may also be offending customers, endangering the health of the dog itself, and could be giving themselves a false sense of security. Canada Post has the right to temporarily suspend mail delivery to a residence or an area if it is deemed that mail delivery cannot be made safely.

Canada Post and Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and their employees have a responsibility to ensure that dog repellent is used safely, and only for the purpose of protection from aggressive animals.


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:25:32 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,30;Dog-Bites-Cause-Preventable-Injuries http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,30;Dog-Bites-Cause-Preventable-Injuries The City of Winnipeg is partnering with Canada Post, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and the Winnipeg Humane Society on an initiative that will promote a safer environment, not only for letter carriers and utility workers, but for all Manitobans.

The organizations are producing a responsible pet ownership brochure that will be distributed to 50,000 pet owners every year through dog license renewals distributed by the City of Winnipeg and to new pet owners through Winnipeg Humane Society adoption kits.

“Though the majority of people are responsible pet owners,” said Tim Dack, Chief Operating Officer, City of Winnipeg Animal Services, “there are still too many dog biting incidents that occur. Service workers should not have to deal with dangerous dogs while carrying out their duties. In 2008 the City of Winnipeg, Animal Services Agency dealt with 230 incidences involving a dog biting a person. Dog bites can range from a nip to severe. No matter the severity of the physical bite a biting dog can cause significant emotional trauma that can stay with someone for many years. Dog owners need to be aware that although their dogs may be perfectly fine when they are with them, their dogs may be aggressive to strangers particularly those service people who show up once in a while on their property.”

"Most dog bites are preventable," said Joe Thievin, General Manager, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services. "Unfortunately, meter readers, by the nature of their jobs, are still prime candidates. Through education and awareness our employees become able to identify and effectively handle conflict with a dog. Public awareness is also necessary and this initiative will help pet owners do their part."

“We are extremely pleased to participate in the production of the brochure. Responsible pet ownership is key to preventing dog bites,” said Ian Irvine, Manager, Delivery Operations, Canada Post. “Since 2008, 18 Manitoba letter carriers have been bitten, and 17 of those happened right here in Winnipeg.

Irvine noted that 13 of those bites caused letter carriers to miss 59 days of work, meaning that on average, each bite caused an employee to take more than four days off to recover.

The City of Winnipeg, Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and Canada Post are committed to providing a healthy and safe work environment by developing and implementing measures to minimize risk to the personal health and safety of their employees. Attacks due to dog incidents/bites are a reality and cause serious injuries every year. This is especially true for strangers entering a yard for the first time and for employees who replace regular employees during holidays since they are unfamiliar to a dog on the route.

The Canada Safety Council estimates there are 460,000 dog bite incidents in any given year and of those, 500 bites are to Canada Post letter carriers. It is impossible to estimate how many more bites occur that are not reported.

“Dogs will bite for any number of reasons, in these instances it is commonly due to the fact a stranger is entering the yard, and the dog takes it as either a threat, or some dogs make it a game. Bites can occur in both instances. There are steps dog owners can take to help manage their dogs’ behaviour,” said Bill McDonald, WHS Executive Director.

All dog owners and homeowners need to do their part to ensure their property is safe for visitors. Manitoba Hydro Utility Services requires that if a dog is present inside the house during a service call, it must be restrained until the utility employee leaves the premises. All dogs should be kept on a leash, in a fenced-in yard, or in the home during delivery hours. Keeping dogs and delivery/utility workers and other visitors apart keeps everyone, including the dog, safe and secure.

For the first time, Canada Post is banning letter carriers from handing out dog treats on their routes. By offering treats, employees may also be offending customers, endangering the health of the dog itself, and could be giving themselves a false sense of security. Canada Post has the right to temporarily suspend mail delivery to a residence or an area if it is deemed that mail delivery cannot be made safely.

Canada Post and Manitoba Hydro Utility Services and their employees have a responsibility to ensure that dog repellent is used safely, and only for the purpose of protection from aggressive animals.


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Turtle Island Award Night a Success In celebration of Be Kind to Animals Week, hundreds of people showed up at an inner-city, family activity evening, held by The WHS last night at the Turtle Island Neighbourhood Centre.

Children of all ages were invited to partake in activities such as storytelling and face-painting, while having the opportunity to visit information booths on everything from responsible pet ownership to pet grooming. The Winnipeg Fire and Paramedic Department and the Winnipeg Police Service’s K9 and Cavalry units also made an appearance.

The night included an awards presentation in which The WHS granted four awards to members of the community who have shown a strong commitment to helping improve the welfare of animals. The awards presented were as follows:

Helping Hands Award–School: Maple Leaf School, accepted by Victor Kuzyk, Principal.

Helping Hands Award–Youth: Gillian Klann & Aleesha Mousseau

Helping Hands Award–Teacher: Petra Wulf

Junior Humane Hero Award: Calli Vanderaa

Calli Vanderaa, a nine-year-old girl who had rescued a puppy from a dumper last year, was unable to attend. The WHS will be looking into holding another award ceremony for her, so that she is able to be formally thanked and acknowledged.


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Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:23:47 -0600 http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,29;Turtle-Island-Award-Night-a-Success http://www.winnipeghumanesociety.ca/article;story,29;Turtle-Island-Award-Night-a-Success In celebration of Be Kind to Animals Week, hundreds of people showed up at an inner-city, family activity evening, held by The WHS last night at the Turtle Island Neighbourhood Centre.

Children of all ages were invited to partake in activities such as storytelling and face-painting, while having the opportunity to visit information booths on everything from responsible pet ownership to pet grooming. The Winnipeg Fire and Paramedic Department and the Winnipeg Police Service’s K9 and Cavalry units also made an appearance.

The night included an awards presentation in which The WHS granted four awards to members of the community who have shown a strong commitment to helping improve the welfare of animals. The awards presented were as follows:

Helping Hands Award–School: Maple Leaf School, accepted by Victor Kuzyk, Principal.

Helping Hands Award–Youth: Gillian Klann & Aleesha Mousseau

Helping Hands Award–Teacher: Petra Wulf

Junior Humane Hero Award: Calli Vanderaa

Calli Vanderaa, a nine-year-old girl who had rescued a puppy from a dumper last year, was unable to attend. The WHS will be looking into holding another award ceremony for her, so that she is able to be formally thanked and acknowledged.


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